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  PART  I (1st 10 AVP 2007 events)

  PART  II (2nd half 8 AVP 2007 events)

   PART  III (last 4 AVP 2007 events)



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AVP TOUR Y2K7-YEAR 2007metalavp.jpg

SCHEDULE

2007 Schedule Announcement

Current schedule for the AVP Tour in the year 2007
*All Confirmed Dates

Date                             Event                                                                                                       Site                                                                      TV

*Febuary 13th 2007 AVP PRO BEACH VOLLEYBALL TOYOTA CHALLENGE             Times Union Cntr Albany,NY                                 * Cable,FSNet

*April 13th-15th 2007 AVP QUERVO GOLD CROWN MIAMI OPEN                                 Bicentenial Park Miami, FLA.                             * Cable,FSNet

*April 19th-22nd 2007 AVP QUERVO GOLD CROWN TEXAS OPEN                              Ameriquest Field  Arlington,TX           .                 * Cable,FSNet

*May 3rd-6th  2007 AVP HUNTINGTON OPEN                Huntington Beach Pier                 Huntington Beach, CA                                          * Cable,FSNet

*May 10th-13th  2007 AVP GLENDALE ARIZONA OPEN Westgate City Center               Glendale, ARIZ.                                                  * Cable,FSNet

*May 17th-20th  2007 AVP HERMOSA BEACH  OPEN         Strand                                   Hermosa Beach, CA                                             *Cable,FSNet

*May 24th-27th  2007 AVP LOUISVILLE OPEN  Festival Plaza at Waterfront Park                Louisville,KY                                                     * Cable,FSNet

*May 31st-June 3rd  2007 AVP TAMPA OPEN                                                                      Tampa, FLA.                                                     * Cable,FSNet

*June 7th-10th     2007 AVP ATLANTA OPEN                                                                       Atlanta,GA                                                            * Cable,FSNet

*June 14th-17th 2007 AVP CHARLESTON OPEN Daniel Islnd Family Circle Tennis Center  Charleston,SC                                                      * Cable,FSNet

*July 5th-8th         2007  AVP SEASIDE HEIGHTS OPEN                                                     Seaside Heights,NJ                                              * Cable,FSNet

*July 19th-22nd    2007 AVP LONG BEACH OPEN                   East Shoreline Drive           Long Beach, CA.                                                   **LIVE on NBC

*Aug 2nd-5th  2007 AVP McDONALDS CHICAGO OPEN   North Avenue Beach               Chicago, IL                                                         **LIVE on NBC

*Aug 9th-12th 2007 AVP MANHATTAN BEACH OPEN    Manhattan Bch Pier                     Manhattan Bch ,CA                                              **LIVE on NBC

*Aug 16th-19th  2007 AVP BOSTON OPEN                         Boston                                            Boston,MA                                                      * Cable,FSNet

*Aug 23rd-26th 2007 AVP BROOKLYN OPEN                   Coney Island Beach                         Brooklyn ,NY                                                   * Cable,FSNet

*Aug 31st-Sept 2nd  2007 AVP CROCS CUP CINCINNATI  Lindner Family Tennis Center     Cincinnati , OH                                                  ** NBC,Live

*September 06th-08th AQUIFINA 2007 AVP Vegas Shootout  Harrah's                                     Las Vegas, NV                                                  *TAPE on NBC 

*September 14th-16th 2007 AVP SAN FRANCISCO OPEN   Bayside                                   SanFrancisco,CA                                                * Cable,FSNet

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                                                                            FIVB 2007 Swatch Beach Volleyball Tour Men's & Women's Schedule





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AVP Professional Men's Beach Volleyball
2007 TELEVISION SCHEDULE  Volleyball.org
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AVP ON NBC TV !!!     :>p~


TV Air Dates:

NBC

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EVENT BROADCAST DATE / TIME

The AVP is proud to bring you over 10 hours of NBC broadcast coverage and over 40 hours of cable coverage of Fox Sports Net! Check out the television schedule below and be sure to watch all the AVP tournaments throughout the season. All broadcasts are listed in local time unless otherwise specified.*

Location Event Dates Network Coverage
 
Miami, FL Apr. 13 - Apr. 15 FSN
Dallas, TX Apr. 19 - Apr. 22 FSN
Huntington Beach, CA May 3 - May 6 FSN
Glendale, AZ May 10 - May 13 FSN
Hermosa Beach, CA May 17 - May 20 FSN
Louisville, KY May 24 - May 27 FSN
Tampa, FL May 31 - Jun. 3 FSN
Atlanta, GA Jun. 7 - Jun. 10 FSN
Charleston, SC Jun. 14 - Jun. 17 FSN
Seaside Heights, NJ Jul. 5 - Jul. 8 FSN
Long Beach, CA Jul. 19 - Jul. 22 NBC and FSN
Chicago, IL Aug. 2 - Aug. 5 NBC and FSN
Manhattan Beach, CA Aug. 9 - Aug. 12 NBC and FSN
Boston, MA Aug. 16 - Aug. 19 NBC and FSN
Brooklyn, NY Aug. 23 - Aug. 26 NBC and FSN
Cincinnati, OH Aug. 30 - Sept. 2 FSN
Las Vegas, NV Sept. 6 - Sept. 8 FSN
San Francisco, CA Sept. 14 - Sept. 16 FSN

*All air times are regional. Please check local listings for viewing times.


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The AVP Is Back on NBC nbc_masthead_080200.gif

Five Live/Tape Broadcasts During the 2007 Season Marks the Return Of Beach
Volleyball to Network Television for the fourth year in a row

The AVP is proud to bring you over 10 hours of NBC broadcast coverage and over 40 hours of cable coverage of Fox Sports Net! Check out the television schedule below and be sure to watch all the AVP tournaments throughout the season.

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FOX SPORTS NET       foxlogo123.gif

EVENT BROADCAST DATE / TIME

 *Check you local listings for Broadcast times yet to be announced actual event dates below only not necessarily brodcast dates

Location Event Dates Network Coverage
 
Miami, FL Apr. 13 - Apr. 15 FSN
Dallas, TX Apr. 19 - Apr. 22 FSN
Huntington Beach, CA May 3 - May 6 FSN
Glendale, AZ May 10 - May 13 FSN
Hermosa Beach, CA May 17 - May 20 FSN
Louisville, KY May 24 - May 27 FSN
Tampa, FL May 31 - Jun. 3 FSN
Atlanta, GA Jun. 7 - Jun. 10 FSN
Charleston, SC Jun. 14 - Jun. 17 FSN
Seaside Heights, NJ Jul. 5 - Jul. 8 FSN
Long Beach, CA Jul. 19 - Jul. 22 NBC and FSN
Chicago, IL Aug. 2 - Aug. 5 NBC and FSN
Manhattan Beach, CA Aug. 9 - Aug. 12 NBC and FSN
Boston, MA Aug. 16 - Aug. 19 NBC and FSN
Brooklyn, NY Aug. 23 - Aug. 26 NBC and FSN
Cincinnati, OH Aug. 30 - Sept. 2 FSN
Las Vegas, NV Sept. 6 - Sept. 8 FSN
San Francisco, CA Sept. 14 - Sept. 16 FSN

*All air times are regional. Please check local listings for viewing times.

AVP on TV
  2007


To catch all the Men's and Women's 2007 AVP Crocs Tour action make sure to visit Fox Sports Net and check your local listings for viewing times.


New to the AVP last year was OLN televising the Men's and Women's semifinal matches. OLN has gone back to televising Hockey & Soccer in 2007 no more Volleyball.


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    AVP Womens News - TV Update
* OLD 2002 information below,stay tuned as to what AVP women's events will be
   scheduled for broadcast on this network in  2005.Oxygenlogo_index.gif

NEW YORK (Variety) - Geraldine Laybourne's Oxygen Media will cablecast five of the seven women's Assn. of Volleyball Professionals (AVP) tournaments this summer. The deal is consistent with Oxygen's recently announced strategy of focusing only on high-visibility women's sports. Six weeks ago, Oxygen laid off 20 people in its sports division, reducing the number of events from 31 per year to about 12. Lydia Stephans, president and executive producer of Oxygen Sports, called the AVP tournaments "the premier women's beach volleyball competition in the world." In addition to the five Oxygen cablecasts, the AVP will get three live broadcasts on NBC.
Oxygen's five cablecasts will run on consecutive Sunday afternoons at 2, beginning June 9.

EVENT BROADCAST DATE / TIME

*Check you local listings for Broadcast times yet to be announced actual event dates below only not necessarily brodcast dates

Oxygen will no longer be carrying Volleyball in 2007.


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AVP Hour on the radio

Courtesy of Hugo Rec.Sport.Volleyball
 
 In yesterday's LA Times (May 17, 2002), a column
 written by Larry Stewart, he mentiones that:
 
 "Karch Kiraly and Sinjin Smith will co-host a new
 weekly show, "The AVP Hour," on KMPC (1540 AM) Thursdays,
 7-8 p.m., beginning next week (May 23, 2002)."
 
 However, I listened to KMPC earlier today (Sat. May 18)
 and I heard a commercial for it and "Geeter" (Chris McGee)
 said that he and Sinjin will be hosting this new
 weekly show. He also said that if you don't listen
 you'll get sand kicked in your face! ;-) Anyway,
 whoever is hosting, it's good to know that the
 vball community is getting high profile ambassadors
 of the game to get the word out about beach
 volleyball on the radio!
 Yay volleyball! I hope that we can continue this
 well into the future. :-)
 
 Hugo
 
 Hey Hugo,Thanks for the info.Any coverage of the AVP by its Players
 is welcome news.By the way Ian Clark has had his own radio show of
 sorts on Live365 for over 2 years now.Take a listen to DJ
 Slimknicky1 at the following link:
 
 Listen!!! to "I-RADIO AVP" IMAN'S Broadcasting in Stereo!!!24/7
 
 Featuring "DJ- KNICKY" playing all the hits for AVP fans!!!

 Coming SOON,Player I-Views & Past Years &Current AVP Event coverage in  Real Audio!

 
  http://www.live365.com/stations/slimnicky1
  I-RADIO AVP



"Karch Kiraly and Sinjin Smith will co-host a new
 weekly show, "The AVP Hour," on KMPC (1540 AM) Thursdays,
 7-8 p.m., beginning next week (May 23, 2002)."

You can listen to it live on the internet on your computer here,follow this link:

KMPC
Sporting News Radio
Los Angeles
1540
Los Angeles, CA.

Click Here

 The AVP Hour

**HAVE NOT HEARD YET IF THERE ARE TO BE RADIO BROADCASTS IN 2007 STAY TUNED but for now listen to archives above.........

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Dig Magazine

Click Here

First Issue: April 2003   (40-pages, around 80 volleyball photos)

Articles:
This month on tour - Ft. Lauderdale, Tempe

Locals only - where AVP players eat, drink and kick it in Fort Lauderdale and Tempe

The scene - Huntington Beach

Ten ways not to break into the AVP tour

Beach Vocabulary 101

Hot tunes

AVP 2003,  Photo Profiles
Misty May - Kerri Walsh
Holly McPeak - Elaine Youngs
Jenny Johnson Jordan - Annett Davis
Carrie Busch - Leanne McSorley
Lisa Arce - Rachel Wacholder
Women's Contenders

Eric Fonoimoana - Dax Holdren
Stein Metzger - Kevin Wong
Mike Whitmarsh - Canyon Ceman
Karch Kiraly - Brent Doble
Albert Hannemann - Sean Scott
Men's Contenders

Hot Gear - Spring Wraps

Fashion Flashback

Legend Connection  Ron Von Hagen - Karch Kiraly

The Clinic - Beach Facts & Myths on Hitting Big

Beach Smack with Brian Lewis

DIG
The next best thing to being at an AVP event!!
Official Magazine of the AVP Tour
Volleyball • Lifestyle • Competition
6 issues for just $18
Call toll free to subscribe:
# 1- 800-999-9718
Get a DIG t-shirt or Hat for just $6 when you subscribe for six issues.
DIG is published six times April through October around AVP events.

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Articles 2006-2007 Off Season

-Catch up on your reading as to what happened after the end of last year's AVP season here.

May-Treanor dominates awards while Rogers is MVP
October 6, 2006

Todd Rogers wins MVP on men's side; May-Treanor and Kerri Walsh, and Stein Metzger and Mike Lambert awarded Team of the Year honors at 2006 AVP Players' Banquet
LOS ANGELES, October 5, 2006
Misty May-Treanor and Todd Rogers took home top honors Thursday night as MVPs of the AVP 2006 season at the Players' Banquet. For the fourth consecutive year, May-Treanor and partner Kerri Walsh were voted 2006 Team of the Year. The honor of the men's Team of the Year was awarded to the CROCS Cup winning team of Stein Metzger and Mike Lambert, who teamed up for the first time this year. All of the awards presented were voted on by the athletes of the AVP.
The star of the evening was May-Treanor, who captured four titles, including the 2006 women's MVP award, Team of the Year, Best Offensive Player for the third year in a row, as well as her first award as the Best Defensive Player. May-Treanor became the first player on either the men's or women's side to win both Offensive and Defensive Player of the Year in one season.
May-Treanor's stats with her partner Walsh provide a resounding exclamation point to her unprecedented awards: This season, they became the winningest team in domestic women's history, finishing with 39 career titles together in U.S. tournaments and a single-season most 13 of 16 domestic titles; they ended the season with 35 straight victories; compiled an astounding 82-3 match record; have played in the finals 44 of 45 AVP events together; and will take a seven-tournament winning streak into the 2007 season. As an individual, May-Treanor finished in the top five in four different statistical categories in terms of per game averages: digs (fifth), kills (fifth), kill percentage (fourth) and hitting percentage (third).
"My husband told me to just say thank you and get off the stage," May-Treanor said. "I just want to say thank you to everyone including my partner and CROCS for all their support. I also want to thank my teammate Kerri Walsh. Sometimes I feel like I want to say I want to spend the rest of my life with you, but that isn't right. I want to say that, but I really mean the rest of my volleyball life."
"Misty May-Treanor is a doll and a pleasure, and I look forward to playing with her for years to come," Walsh said.
On the men's side, the teams of Rogers and Phil Dalhausser and Metzger and Lambert battled throughout the season for domination on the AVP Tour. A closely-contested Team of the Year award went to Metzger and Lambert. The duo played in 14 of 15 Final Fours this season, more than any other team; their 11-match winning streak at one point tied for the longest this season; won the inaugural CROCS Cup by a slim six points; and compiled a 67-15 match record.
"In the middle of the season, we just picked up and took care of business," Metzger said. "We didn't care who led the way. We just needed to find our way home."
Rogers captured two titles, including the 2006 men's MVP and the Defensive Player of the Year. Rogers and Dalhausser won eight of 16 titles, including Rogers winning both post-season events: King of the Beach (best individual player) and the Best of the Beach (best team on the beach). Rogers won nine AVP CROCS Tour titles, the most since Kent Steffes in 1998; had a 9-1 mark in AVP championship matches; his 10 finals appearances were the most of any player this year; and will take an 11-match winning streak including the last three titles into 2007.
"This whole year has been so surreal," Rogers said. "If somebody had told me this, I wouldn't have believed them. I couldn't be happier in the way this year has turned out for my career."
Dalhausser captured the award for 2006 men's Offensive Player of the Year as well as the Most Improved Player. The "Thin Beast" collected $143,375 in earnings, more than two and one half times what he made last season; led the tour in blocks for the second year in a row (432), in addition to kill percentage (.627) and hitting percentage (.481). Last year, Dalhausser won only one event his first ever win with partner Nick Lucena and finished first in blocks (405) and sixth in hitting percentage (.588).
Nicole Branagh, last year's Rookie of the Year, took home Most Improved Player on the women's side. In her first 19 pro beach events, Branagh had a best of fifth, while in her last 12 events, she was in the semifinals nine times, including two finals appearances.
"You know the beach is our office, and we are the luckiest people in the world," Branagh said.
There was a tie on the women's side for Rookie of the Year between Logan Tom and April Ross, with Brad Keenan earning the honor for the men. In Hermosa Beach, Keenan went in through the qualifier, then placed third, tying for the best finish from a qualifier in AVP history. Tom finished as high as fifth. Ross finished ninth in back-to-back tournaments her career best knocking off three top-10 teams in the process.
The 2006 AVP tour had 16 stops and has scheduled 18 for the 2007 season. This season the AVP was telecast on NBC, Fox Sports Net and FOX for the first time.
Updates on the 2007 season can be found at www.avp.com.

2006 AVP Awards Winners:

Men:

MVP: Todd Rogers
Offense: Phil Dalhausser
Defense: Todd Rogers
Improved: Phil Dalhausser
Rookie of the Year: Brad Keenan
Team of the Year: Mike Lambert and Stein Metzger


Women:

MVP: Misty May-Treanor
Offense: Misty May-Treanor
Defense: Misty May-Treanor
Improved: Nicole Branagh
Rookie of the Year: April Ross and Logan Tom
Team of the Year: Misty May-Treanor and Kerri Walsh

AVP 2007 VOLLEYBALL VIDEO:



Over the winter the AVP has join forces with MLBAM. Which stands for Major League Baseball Advanced Media, L.P., is a subsidiary of Major League Baseball.
Meaning AVP.com is now managed by MLBAM.




Five Tips with Kerri Walsh
October 13, 2006

What skills immediately transferred over from the hardcourt to the beach?

All of the skills are fundamentally the same. Adjustments must be made/learned because of the changing elements. Learning to use to wind, learning to read the wind, learning to run/jump in the sand...all of these things affect a players' timing on the beach. Timing counts for a whole lot on the beach but patience is needed when making the transition because timing changes all the time depending on how hard the wind is blowing, and how deep/shallow the sand is.

What new skills did you have to improve on?
I had to learn the subtleties of the game. My timing on blocking was terrible when I made the transition from the hardwood. On the beach it is very important to be late and quick so as to not let the hitter know where you are blocking and what you are taking on the block.
The earlier you jump to block, the more it helps out the hitter. Learning to wait was difficult for me. I still jump too early way too often.
Overall, I had to improve on every skill. Like I said, the "elements" make a very simple straight forward game potentially very tricky if one does not know how to adjust. I had to work on all of my skills and still have to work on everything because the game is changing, getting better, and being able to grow with the game is huge.

What is the biggest difference?
The biggest difference is how much responsibility each player has with regard to touches on the ball and court area to cover. Learning to take care of every ball and to "better" the ball on "off" plays is very important because there are only 2 players compared to 6 in indoor v-ball. So, I would say responsibility and timing are two of the biggest differences when comparing the two.

What is the biggest similarity?
The fundamentals of the game do not change from indoor to beach.
Communication is extremely important, ball control is a must, and being competent in every skill-bump, set, spike, serve- is necessary; actually, it's is more necessary to be competent in every skill on the beach because there are no substitutions and no where to hide.

Why did you cross over?
I was 22 at the time I decided to make the switch and it was actually just really good timing. I had been playing for 12 years on the hardwood, had just finished with the Sydney Olympics, desired a change because I did not want to play overseas and the biggest blessing was that Misty May was looking for a partner. Sign me up!! To be able to play with he best player in the world right off the bat was an unbelievable opportunity and made the decision very easy.

Give five tips for the Indoor Player that helped you be the most successful on hard court.
1. Tall or Small be the best passer you can be
2. Defense wins championships
3. After you attack the ball check out where the other team is on defense....lets you know where the open court is and where they are vulnerable.
4. Hitting the ball as hard as you can is impressive but learning to have a soft and smart touch on the ball is just as good.
5. Talk to your teammates, tell each other what is open, support them and cheer them on in good and bad times. Knowing that your team has your back is a wonderful thing.

Off-Season Plans: How Up and Coming AVP Stars will spend their off-season
By Colleen Murray
October 16, 2006
For die-hard AVP fans, it's jarring to see your favorite players compete weekend after weekend and then, once September hits, lose track of these athletes. We asked some players: What are your off-season plans?
 
Aaron Wachtfogle 
"I would like to get some more work experience and use my education a little bit. Also, a little bit of travel. I have a trip to Hawaii planned, but also doing some work in finance." -Aaron Wachtfogel
"No sure plans yet, but I'm sure I'll be going to the East Coast for the holidays, going home back to Florida. I'll probably head up to Myrtle Beach, S.C., to see all my buddies up there and just hang out. We've been pretty busy this year." -Phil Dalhausser
"I'm going to go to a training facility in Arizona again. I went last year and it's called Athletes Performance. It's an elite training facility where they work with athletes that are going through the NFL Combine. They do a bunch of baseball players. Everything is very sport-specific, and the people there are incredibly knowledgeable. And everything is so intertwined with the nutritionists and the strength coaches and the speed and the jumps. Everybody's all on the same page, so I don't have to worry about what I am eating, what am I doing, they all just take care of it for me. It's kind of living the dream. I've got a sponsor that's going to pay for it and I'm fortunate enough to have that opportunity."-Ryan Mariano
 
John Mayer 
"I plan on maybe taking like a month off and then play as much as I can. We're looking at going to New Zealand and Australia. They have a tour over there in January. We kind of figure, considering where we're at, the more we play, the better we're gonna get, so we'll be doing reps everyday. We want to take a month off, and play for the next 11 to try and get ready. This season fired me up so much to play. I feel like I can do it, but I need to work this hard to get there. I figure in the off-season, we're gonna do some non-volleyball stuff, like some plyometrics, and stuff to get in better shape and get more athletic. We'll play wherever we can and as much as we can, eight days a week, play everyday." -John Mayer
"I think we're both going to play indoor so we're not going to be training for the beach or anything." -Keao Burdine on her and partner April Ross's plans
"Well, I'm heading over to play indoor again [in Korea], so I'll be playing indoor for 6 months, I'm going to concentrate on the weight room a lot over there, see if I can put on some weight, be a little bit scarier on the beach." -Sean Rooney
"Taking at least month off, hopefully, because we played a long season. Then, we just get back on it. Go to the gym, train, play, and try and get better for next year." -Sean Rosenthal
"I'm going to Spain. Luckily for me, the place I'm going to is an island, it's called Tenerife. I've talked to other players out here and there are players that play for the FIVB that live out there and train year-round so hopefully I'll be able to do that." -Logan Tom

Brooke Hanson 
"Going on my honeymoon. I got married in December. We like Hawaii, so we'll probably go there." -Brooke Hanson

"I'm gonna work with people, a blocking specialist maybe, just do different skills and repping it. Just getting the different techniques." -Nicole Branagh

"In the off-season, I am directing the Wave Boys Volleyball Club in Del Mar, San Diego." -Matt Olson

"Taking a couple weeks off. It's going to be Jen Snyder, my partner, and my first off-season. So we're gonna train a couple days a week. We're actually thinking about traveling and trying to train in other countries." -Janelle Ruen

"Playing a lot of video games, like Halo 2. I'll probably hang out in Florida for a while." -Nick Lucena

Brent Doble has been a steady fixture in the men's top ten for the past ten years
By Matt Zuvela
October 18, 2006
Brent Doble has been a steady fixture in the men's top ten for the past ten years. He has five career titles to his name and finished ninth or better eight times in 2006. Doble is one of a few players on the AVP tour who did not come from California. In fact, Doble is from St. Paul, Minnesota, and is one of a growing number of players from the Midwest. Doble told us his thoughts on the Midwest presence on the tour and some of his favorite things to do in the off-season.
When you think of the off-season what is the first thing to come to mind?
Hanging with the kids. Spending some quality time with my family. I really enjoy being around them. The kids are at such a wonderful age. We get to do all kinds of cool stuff. I look forward to that, and it's hard in the summer to be apart from them. So I really look forward to that, and I look forward to the pace of my life and how it slows down.
And the second thing that comes to mind?
Beer. [Brent Laughs]
At what point do you start looking forward to the next season?
I don't know! I've got a renewed sense (for the game). Playing with Ryan [Mariano] has been great. We've had a pretty good year and we've beat some good teams. My body feels fantastic. So I'm excited. Usually about January 1st I get real serious about it. Last season I was injured, so I had those three or four months in the weight room and doing therapy, and I'm going to do the same thing. I'm going to get two or three days a week in the gym working out, and then come next season, I'm going to be ready to beat down some young kids.
Speaking of young kids -- and ones from the Midwest -- what do you think is in store for Hans Stolfus?
I think it's great for Midwest volleyball - guys like Jeff Nygaard from Wisconsin, me from Minnesota, Paul Baxter from Minnesota. Hans has been playing some unbelievable, really steady volleyball, and I just wish him the best of luck. He and Aaron [Wachtfogul] have been a force to be reckoned with all last season, and I just look forward to more years of competing against them.
Do you play any other sports during the off season?
I used to play basketball regularly, but then the body just wouldn't heal. It just got too beat up. Now, I'll play some four-man volleyball down in San Onofre. Lots of BBQ's, watch lots of sunsets, and hang with the kids. That's what I'm really looking forward to are BBQs on the weekends in the fall before the time changes.

8 Titles Short: Volleyball Lingo 101 (Part I)
By Hans Stolfus
October 19, 2006
Hans Stolfus is just 8 Titles Short of being the winningest player in Midwest history. Hans, a native of Iowa, knows that if he plays until 2015 and everyone else retires, he might have a chance to catch Brent Doble of Michigan with five career titles and Jeff Nygaard of Wisconsin with seven career titles. After 12 top-ten finishes including a third in Hermosa Beach in 2006, Hans is just 8 Titles Short of being the best from the Midwest.
Join Hans Stolfus, the 2005 AVP Rookie of the Year and half of the seventh best team on tour in 2006, as he blogs about volleyball, the tour and anything else top of mind. Got a subject you want Hans to cover, you can email him at 8titlesshort@avp.com.
Let's get one thing straight. I love talking volley. Ask anyone I know, especially my girlfriend. It dominates my being; almost in a bad way. Regardless, it is what it is, and at the risk of becoming a bore, I'm always trying to use new verbage in my dialog. Did I single handedly create any of the words I'm about to explain? Not a chance. Do I use them incessantly? Absolutely! So much so that when the AVP asked me to have a seat courtside and contribute to the play by play in Lake Tahoe, I was compelled to break out some new volley lingo in hopes of sprucing up the live updates. Now, maybe it was the outside air temperature of 37 degrees and the fact that I could not feel my fingers or perhaps I was just delirious, but at the time of broadcast, I thought things were going over quite humorously.
And not until I was notified by the AVP of a fan's email did I realize that my style of commentary certainly isn't for everyone;
"Could you please not let Hans Stolfus do the play by play anymore. I can't understand anything he is saying." She's not anonymous but I won't use her name...
So, let's get after it. We have a lot to cover...
Why don't we kick it off with a couple of different shots:
Jumbo Shrimp - A high loopy shot perfectly placed into the opposite corner. The defender must be sitting in the angle as the shot goes over their head and most importantly, their knees must buckle as they realize they have no chance to play it. Karch Kiraly is one of the best at this shot and also defending against it, but I did see Jason Ring jumbo him in Huntington Beach, 2004 -- Not going to lie, one of the best shots I've ever seen.
Shallow Shrimp - Basically when your partner yells "HIGH LINE!" and instead of listening you roll the ball ever so slightly into the angle with just enough arc that the defender has time to actually wave their hand -- signaling for a fair catch. If the defender's knees buckle at any point while this shot is played, they are mandated to retire immediately following the match.
Cutty - More often referred to as an angle shot or simply a cutshot. Keith Dobkowski calls it the cutter -- either way; numerous players have made lengthy careers off this shot, combined with just a hint of misdirection. Casey Jennings, John Hyden, Misty May, Holly McPeak and Karch Kiraly are a few who have mastered the cutty.
Knuckle Pokey - Arguably the worst name of any shot in the game. (It actually limits our street cred) Pinky and Ring fingers close into a fist with the thumb while the first and middle fingers imitate bent bunny ears and form a mini platform between their knuckles; hard to describe to say the least but easily one of the most effective shots in the game when used correctly. The knuckle pokey can be used on offense when the set is 50/50 and the attacker just needs to rise up a few additional inches over the block; or on defense when a blocker pulls off the net and they need to play that ball that is rolling over their head onto the back line.
Cobra Kai - Ben Koski and Jeff Minc's outfits at any formal function - paying homage to Johnny and his crew from the Karate Kid; OR, the knuckle pokey on steroids, either way. It involves forming your hand like the shape of a cobra's head and contacting the ball directly with your fingertips. If not performed perfectly, you run the risk of getting called on a 'Push' by certain unknowing referees like...
Roge - Said with a French accent almost like 'Row-Che,' but the che is deeper and there is definitely an accent over the e. Coined and created by the Professor himself, 2006 MVP Todd Rogers; the shot involves skills no ordinary human could ever possibly possess. However, if you feel like trying to impersonate the master, here's his signature shot... Start off on the right side of the court; ask for a rather high, up and down set, jump higher than it looks like your body is capable of, hang in the air for around 10 seconds, wait for the blocker to return to the sand and then slap the ball sharply back to within 6 inches of the right side line -- EVERY TIME.
Yahtzee - Possibly my favorite term, wait, what am I talking about? It is my favorite term and one that I am not afraid to yell out from the stands during marquee matches when a guy like Phil absolutely crushes a ball straight down and J. Roueche taps the BOOM button over the loud speaker. First off, a Yahtzee must connect with the opposing team's sand without a touch from either defender. Second, it's not that hard hit to the corner your college coach preached about every day in practice; it's an absolute smashdown with enough velocity to create a divot. How about an example...
Vegas Line (see the video above) - This phrase is going to last a lifetime. Hell, I even heard some kid at the Jay-O Invitational tell his friends - in a really high voice - how he just hit 'Vegas Line!' I don't know about that but I do know the term was coined in Las Vegas, 2005 when Sean 'Rosie' Rosenthal decided to absolutely deliver the word of GOD on a ball - hard line. The result? The ball bounced about 80 feet straight into the air off the sand; all while Mike Lambert was also blocking line. The crowd gasped in amazement and FSN replayed it in slow motion three times to make sure what everyone just saw, actually happened. It was most definitely a Yahtzee!
Adjectives often used during the course of a match (playing or spectating) include: Sick, Sweet, Nasty, Ludicrous and of course Ridiculous -- or Ridunculous if something is super out of control. And all of those are equivalent to the word, "Good."
As for setting:
Sauce - As good as it gets. If this was a spelling bee and you needed it in a sentence, "Dear Lord. Did you see that back set from off the court? It was absolute Sauce." In the same breath, one could substitute either Butter or Nectar and do just fine. I personally prefer the plural forms of both of these; like, "Canyon only sets butters, his hands are like mint." Of course the definition of a great set is very subjective but universally a ball with zero spin and an uncanny ability to float at the apex of its arch would be considered Sauce.
Chowder (Play the Video below to see Chowder) - Not just the opposite of Sauce but quite honestly the worst thing to witness during a professional volleyball match. When a ball leaves the setter's hands and helicopters to an undesirable location on the court, all fans should simultaneously yell, "Chowder!" So ugly and grotesque that it reminds the casual observer of an old bowl of clams from New England and gets its name from the broth.
Chopsticks - Anyone who pokes at the ball with their fingertips while trying to set their partner. Not necessarily always a bad set, this term merely presents a certain kind of Szechuan style. However, when the ball doesn't leave the setter's hands in the desired manner, the phrase, "Do you honestly eat with those hands?" often follows.
And Blocking:
Dome - That short FSN commercial where John Hyden yells, "High Line!" and his partner Jeff Nygaard gets absolutely domed straight down by Phil, the "Thin Beast" Dalhausser is the best example I can think of. Dome, Domed, Domie; they're all referring to the same thing; Getting blocked so hard straight down you temporarily forget your own name. Roof is also used under the same context...
Joust - Most amateurs know this one but just in case -- when two players make contact with the ball simultaneously above the plane of the net and then proceed to battle for bragging rights. I, for one, have never won a joust; maybe it's my ridiculous physique. A joust presents the only time beach volleyball players are allowed to attack the ball with an open hand. So if you are super sneaky and see your competitor approaching the 50/50 ball with only one option in mind, pull your hands last second and they will get called for an illegal contact; unless of course, the referee is ... who probably won't see it.
How about some defense:
Lippy - Or Lip if you prefer. Basically the defender lips a ball that ordinarily would have made its way to the sand, allowing the rally to continue. It goes down merely as a dig in the stats column but there are many names (Up, Scoop) for this incredible skill mastered by the likes of Misty May, Todd Rogers, Rachel Wacholder and Casey Jennings. I personally think each term presents an ideal opportunity to place the word Sick before it, such as; "My word, that was a sick up!"
Platter - Also called the "Waiter." Both terms help make this extraordinary defensive maneuver almost self explanatory. The defender holds up one hand - similar to a waiter carrying a platter of food - and digs the ball straight up and down, giving their partner enough time to turn off the net and set the sauce. Usually executed out of pure instinct, the platter is generally not the first choice of defense. Kerri Walsh had more than one sick platter dig in the Manhattan Beach Finals and she is 6'3". I know because I have my DVR set for all things volley and the match came on at 5:00 AM Sunday morning -- so I watched it; over and over and over. It's all I got here in Minnesota.
Lingo Jason Ring and I would like to see disappear and never return:
Netty - Grown men (some of whom work out, a lot) yelling at the top of their lungs, "NETTY! NETTY! NETTY!" when they think one of the opposing players has committed a net violation. It's just embarrassing and should be replaced with, "Sir, I honestly believe with all of my heart that Mike touched the net with his nipples during the culmination of that play." And if that summons no positive results; throw your hat at the stand, lean on the net for at least ten seconds rolling your eyes and then take a seat in the sand proclaiming, "This is all a conspiracy, I'm not playing anymore until you start calling their nets!" See how that goes over for you...
Hans will return to AVP.com throughout the off-season. Make sure to stop by often as Hans gives you the inside scoop on the tour and more...

Catching Up With Bob Samuelson
What a difference a few months and some controversy can make.
Early in 1992, 6-foot-5 Bob Samuelson was a 26-year-old substitute middle blocker and opposite for the U.S. Men’s National Volleyball team. Known for the enthusiasm and emotion he used to motivate the team, but not considered one of the stars, he worried that he might not make the team that would compete in the Olympic Games in Barcelona that year.
“Every day in practice I felt like I had to play well or I would be cut that day,” he said. “I always thought I was going to be cut.”
Fast forward to December 1992; Samuelson, who shaves his head due to a skin condition called alopecia, is on the cover of Volleyball Monthly Magazine and there is an article entitled “Barcelona Bob.” The term “volleybald” has become synonymous with the team that won the bronze medal in Barcelona after they shaved their heads in support of Samuelson, who was involved in a yellow-card controversy in the opening match against Japan.
Later in 1992, USA Volleyball has offered Samuelson a six-figure contract to keep him in the United States instead of playing for an Italian club team. Samuelson has signed endorsement deals with Club Sportswear and Oakley Sunglasses. An ad featuring a photo of a very serious Samuelson with the words “No More Mr. Nice Guy” is plastered around New York City to promote a match against Japan at Madison Square Garden.
 Was Samuelson ready for all this notoriety?
“No. Unfortunately, no,” says Samuelson. “I wasn’t prepared to take on a lot of the responsibilities that came with being that person; the face of the team.”
These days, Samuelson lives in El Segundo, Calif., and works in sales for Verisign. He has been married for seven years to wife, Liza, and has triplet boys – Magnus, Hunter and Jackson – who are 4 and a half. If things go as he hopes, next year he will qualify to play in the main draw on the AVP Tour.
“I played some (beach) tournaments two years ago for my friend Coley Kyman,” Samuelson said. “We had a good time. Last season (playing with Andrew Vazquez), it got to be where we were just good enough to almost make it into the main draw. We’re going to spend the winter working out and getting into shape and see if I can get lucky.”
Samuelson says he is sometimes recognized at these events, and it still surprises him that people remember him. But he also admits that his “look is pretty unique.”
Like many future volleyball players, Samuelson thought he was destined to be a basketball player when he attended Pierce Junior College in Southern California in the late 1980s. His plan was to play basketball at Syracuse. But that changed when he took a volleyball class at Pierce.
“Ken Stanley was a teacher of the class. He suggested I try out for the team,” Samuelson said. “I loved the guys on the team and I loved the coach.”
A volleyball player was born. Samuelson got some national notoriety when he made the team that competed at the U.S. Olympic Festival. He was recruited by many top programs, but chose to play at Cal State Northridge because he knew a lot of the guys and also knew he’d get playing time in spite of his lack of experience.
 With his time at Northridge nearing an end in 1989, Samuelson went to Pepperdine University for an open tryout for the U.S. Men’s National Volleyball Team. Somewhat to his surprise, he was called back to attend the “invitational” tryout that was going on in San Diego.
“We played four hours a day for three days. Every time you did something, coaches were standing around writing feverishly. I was a nervous wreck,” he said.
Samuelson returned to Northridge for finals week; but his studying was interrupted by a call from Jim Coleman inviting him to join the team. Samuelson asked when he should leave.
“Coleman said, ‘We want you to dome down and start training immediately. We leave for Russia in two weeks and you have a chance to make that trip,’ ” Samuelson remembered.
Samuelson begged he professors to let him make up his exams later, but while they were excited for his opportunity, they said they would have to fail him if he missed his finals.
“I literally just quit the last week of school. I made the travel team, and two weeks later I was in Moscow,” he said.
By the time the 1992 Olympic Games in Barcelona rolled around, Samuelson had become a key to U.S. Head Coach Fred Sturm’s lineup. He could substitute Samuelson either for middle blocker Bryan Ivie, or for outside hitter Steve Timmons. But in the second set of the first Olympic match against Japan, Ivie injured his knee. Samuelson came in as a substitute and tried to kick-start the team with his enthusiastic and emotional play.
In the fourth set, with the U.S. team leading 7-4 (Japan was leading the match two games to one), Samuelson was issued a yellow card for loudly disputing a call. Later, with Japan ahead 14-13, Samuelson, upset with a line call, snapped at the linesman. A second yellow card was issued. Then, the scorekeeper’s table let the referees know that it was Samuelson’s second yellow card and that it should be a red card. However, a red card would mean that Japan would get a point and win the game and the match. Not wanting the match to end on a technicality, the referees waived off the second yellow card and let the teams continue to play.
“I was kind of piecing it together,” Samuelson said. “I didn’t remember getting the first yellow card. The second one was so quick... All of a sudden I see the down judge. I remember thinking “Oh no, this could be bad.
“I remember looking at the head official. I could see his mind turning. You could see him realizing the implication: ‘If I give him another yellow card, I give the match to Japan.’"
Japan’s coach tried to argue, but to no avail. Japan served for match point, but didn’t get it. The game continued and the United States ended up winning 17-16 in the days before rally scoring. Team USA also won a dramatic fifth set, 16-14, and the match. Or so it thought.
The next morning, the FIVB Control Committee met with representatives from Japan and the United States, and ruled that the U.S. victory would be overturned.
“It is impossible to feel any smaller,” Samuelson said. “I was trying to step up and accept responsibility and take ownership, but I just wanted to go away and hide.”
However, Samuelson’s teammates weren’t going to let him give up. It was Timmons, the team captain, who told Samuelson to “buck up” because the team would need him if it was to have any hope for a medal. And by the way, the team had come up with a plan… A little while later, Samuelson found himself with his electric razor in his hand and Timmons’ famous red flat-top hairdo in front of him.
It was Timmons’ idea to have the team shave their heads in support of Samuelson. But the rest of the team would not do it unless Timmons went first.
“I wasn’t sure what to do, logistically. Do I start with the ear? Then I took it to the skin right down the middle so there was no turning back,” Samuelson said. “Everyone was cracking up.”
The Americans went on to win the bronze medal, losing to Brazil in the semifinals and defeating Cuba in the third-place game. Looking back, Samuelson says, the team was not disappointed with the outcome.
“Obviously, we were shooting for the gold. In all reality, we knew we were long shots even to medal. People had us picked to finish anywhere from fifth to 10th.”
Samuelson returned to the United States a media darling. But his status as “the face of USA Volleyball” did not last long. He was having problems with his knee and not getting along with the U.S. coaching staff. In 1994, a Japanese team made him an offer he couldn’t refuse and he headed for the country that had inadvertently helped him gain his fame.
He spent two happy seasons in Japan before returning to the United States in 1996.
In 1998, Samuelson went back to Northridge to finish his degree. Professors warned him that many of the classes were full and, although he was welcome to stay, he might not be admitted to the class. But Samuelson, perhaps volleyball’s most successful substitute, knew that if he had patience, he would get in the class and that he could be successful.
“Once I had some discipline in my life, it was amazing how easy it was,” Samuelson said.

Torrance High, LMU Standout Blankinship Dies at 31
B.J. Hoeptner Evans
COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. (Oct. 20, 2006) -- Former beach volleyball player Kim Blankinship, considered the greatest female athlete in Torrance High School history and set for induction into the Loyola Marymount University Athletics Hall of Fame, died suddenly on Oct. 16 of an apparent heart attack.
 Blankinship, who turned 31 on Oct. 14, died Monday night at St. Mary Medical Center in Long Beach, hours after her fiancé awakened in the morning to find her unconscious in bed at their Seal Beach home, said her father, Mike Blankinship.
After starring in soccer, volleyball and track at Torrance High School, Blankinship played volleyball at Loyola Marymount from 1993-1996, leading LMU to three West Coast Conference titles and three NCAA postseason appearances.
As a junior, Blankinship was named WCC Defensive Player of the Year. That 1995 season, she also set the LMU record for single-season service aces and service ace average. Her records of 66 aces and .68 per game still stand today. In her senior campaign, Blankinship became the third athlete in LMU history to earn an All-America honor. She also earned LMU Female Athlete of the Year and WCC Co-Player of the Year honors that year.
She was scheduled to be inducted into the LMU Hall of Fame in January 2007.
Blankinship played beach volleyball for the Women’s Professional Volleyball Association in 1997. She also played in a 1999 USA Volleyball beach tournament and on the Beach Volleyball America tour in 2000.
Blankinship served as the General Manager of the Marketing Division at Student Sports, a Torrance-based media and marketing company where she worked since 2000.

Click here to read the article in th Daily Breeze.

Click here to read the article on the Student Sports web site.

Click here to go to Loyola Marymount's remembrance page.

Click here to view Kim Blankinship's profile and photo in the Beach Volleyball Database.

One Piece of Advice
By Colleen Murray
October 24, 2006
The beach is, in a word, different. From the sand to the bikinis to the two-player court, beach volleyball and indoor volleyball are two separate balls of wax. The younger players on the AVP tour clearly remember the time when they were first adjusting to the transition from indoor to beach and we asked Keao Burdine, Sean Rooney, John Mayer, Logan Tom, and Nicole Branagh to offer their advice to indoor studs looking to put away their uniform and kneepads for a bikini or board shorts in the near future.

Keao Burdine is a Southern California native but she recommended that everyone feel like a beach baby before joining the AVP.
"Get your sand legs," Burdine advised. "Train in the sand, don't even worry about working out in the gym. Just go down to the beach and work out everyday."
For Sean Rooney, he made a big name for himself indoor and became a full-time AVP player amid a lot of hype. The hype, however, did not detract him from noticing the other stellar players out there.
"I would say just to watch the best players and learn from them," Rooney said. "Come out and watch and try and pick up things from their game and try to add them to your game because there are so many good players out here. You can learn a lot just by watching."
Rooney's former Pepperdine teammate John Mayer noted the value in practice.
"Play every day, eight days a week, there's nothing that can replace pass-and-hit, and you know, doing the reps," Mayer said.
But Mayer also realized that the cliché goes, "Practice makes perfect," not "Practice makes rich." He reminded players coming to the beach of this reality, too.
"The talent levels are really good," Mayer said. "You have to earn what you get out here, and nothing's gonna come easy. But it's so fun. It's like I would pay to do this, but sometimes I get paid to do it."
Money at the beginning might be discouraging, but Logan Tom urges young players to not give up.
"Stick with it," Tom advises. "There's been a lot of times where I've been like, I don't want to play anymore. From a volleyball standpoint and from an ego standpoint, it's hard to get out here and lose. I don't like losing."
As an indoor player, Tom ensured that she would rarely lose. At Stanford, she was a four-time All-American and a two-time National Player of the Year. When Stanford won the 2001 National Championship, Tom earned MVP.
"When you've had a good career indoor and I know what I'm doing indoor, and it's easy at the beginning to say, why am I doing this? Why do I have to go through all this crap? I just want to hang up the bikini. But it passes. I'm praying it passes. But it's getting better everyday, but like I said, stick with it. It's hard, it's tough."
It paid off for Tom as she won the 2006 AVP Rookie of the Year and set a career best 5th place finish in Brooklyn.
For Nicole Branagh, her success came fast as well. She was the 2005 Rookie of the Year and in her second season, saw the Sacramento and Hoover finals and was seeded 2nd in Manhattan Beach.
Her sentiments sum up those of other young players.
"Get your sand legs. That takes some time. But don't get discouraged in the beginning because it is different than if you play indoor. Being on a hard surface and coming out here, it's different and it's hard," Branagh said.
"This is hard work, but it's so much fun. I'd say just don't get discouraged in the beginning, just hang in there, get those sand legs, and things just come together."

Adding to the Family mid-season
By Matt Zuvela
October 26, 2006
John Hyden went through one of the biggest changes of his life during the 2006 season: he became a father. However, in terms of his training and commitment to volleyball, he hardly missed a beat. John gives a lot of credit to his wife, Robin, for shouldering the majority of the baby responsibilities while John was in season, allowing him to stay focused on his game until the season was over. Now in the off-season, John is spending some much anticipated quality time with his daughter, Samantha, while also getting ready for another season with his partner, Jeff Nygaard, who is going to be a father soon as well.
John and Robin answered a few questions about being a volleyball family and discussed their unusual agreement for changing diapers.

Was it difficult for the baby to come during the middle of the season?
John: We actually planned to have her at the end of the season in September, but we messed up somewhere along the way (laughs). She came four months early. We thought it was going to be a problem, but Robin has been so great. She's not like every wife. She said 'you know what? Go sleep in the other room, you need sleep and you need to play well.' It was like every other season for me. I got my rest and everything was great. Robin's a trooper.

Robin (laughing): He was happy that we had the baby in the middle of the season.
John: Yeah! When I look back on it, it's a lot better.

Was it difficult to stay 100% focused on volleyball?
For me, no. I was really focused this year. I had picked up a new trainer and was excited about the direction I went. Robin has single-handedly taken care of the baby. She took charge, and basically said 'You need to play well, you need your sleep, and you need to stay focused.'

Has having a new member of the family changed your approach to the game at all?
Not really. I don't look at it like 'Ok, now I have a baby I have to win money.' I still like to just go out and have fun. I really like to compete, so it hasn't changed much on my focus or anything.

Have you given your partner (expecting father Jeff Nygaard) any parenting tips?
John (points to Robin): That would be her! We call her 'the Baby Whisperer.' She seems to take care of the baby pretty well, so Jeff usually goes to her for the tips.

Robin: Jeff and [Jeff's wife] Renee were with us in New Jersey seeing first hand what its like to have a new born. It was an eye opener for them. Jeff always asks John about pregnancy -- which trimester does it get easy? When do (the wives) actually become pleasant again?

Is there anything unique about being a volleyball family?
Robin: We traveled with her. She went to New Jersey and Chicago before she was six weeks old, so we're basically training her, saying 'this is what your life is going to be like, so get used to it.' And she was great -- she's a good traveler.

During Robin's pregnancy, her and John made a deal. He would clean the cat box during the nine months of her pregnancy, and she would change the first nine months of diapers. Robin explained this arrangement a little further:

Robin: I couldn't clean the kitty litter for nine months, so I told him I would change all the diapers for the first nine months.

John: That didn't work out so well.

Robin: Yeah, I started adding it up in my head. He changed the litter three times a week for nine months, and I'm changing eight diapers a day. He got two months.

Four Tips with Holly McPeak
October 27, 2006
What skills immediately transferred over from the hardcourt to the beach?
Basic Ball Control Skills. Hitting, setting, bumping and serving all are basically the same. The difference is in the footwork where you have to get used to pushing off sand.

What new skills did you have to improve on?
Mostly Footwork and dealing with the wind. For instance, in Las Vegas a thirty mile per hour wind was sweeping North-South across the court. The wind forced us to make adjustments that we would never face indoors. Having to dive for a ball and have to adjust midair to combat the movement caused by the wind is one of the most fun and most challenging parts of the outdoor game.

What is the biggest difference?
The biggest difference has been footwork and covering the whole court. While we do play on a shorter court than indoors, with only two of us, there is just so much more area to cover. As a defender on tour I have to cover the entire backcourt. The communication changes as my blocker must close off half the court and I am responsible for covering the other half. Throw in a floater or roll shot and there are times I am covering most of the court. This does not happen indoors. Unless both my partner and I are able to communicate perfectly, we will not win.

What is the biggest similarity?
Technique. Setting, bumping, serving and passing are all the same. You hit the ball the same way and therefore your arms, hands, and eyes are always in the same place as they would be indoors. However, the outdoor elements, wind and sand, often forces your body into positions it would not otherwise be in. The adjustment to get your hands, arms and head into the right place is the challenge that exists on the beach.

Why did you cross over?
Beach is more physical and more mentally challenging. With only two of us on a court, the unpredictable nature of the wind and pushing off sand, the game becomes more physical and therefore more mentally challenging.

Give four tips for the Indoor Player that helped you be the most successful on hard court
1. Repetition of Skills
2. Leg Strengthening
3. Competitive Drills
4. Good Technical Coaching

8 Titles Short: Working Out with Jason Ring (Part I)
By Hans Stolfus
November 3, 2006
Hans Stolfus is just 8 Titles Short of being the winningest player in Midwest history. Hans, a native of Iowa, knows that if he plays until 2015 and everyone else retires, he might have a chance to catch Brent Doble of Michigan with five career titles and Jeff Nygaard of Wisconsin with seven career titles. After 12 top-ten finishes including a third in Hermosa Beach in 2006, Hans is just 8 Titles Short of being the best from the Midwest.
Join Hans Stolfus, the 2005 AVP Rookie of the Year and half of the seventh best team on tour in 2006, as he blogs about volleyball, the tour and anything else top of mind. Got a subject you want Hans to cover, you can email him at 8titlesshort@avp.com.
So, when I got to the University of Hawaii back in 1995 and walked on to the Men's Volleyball Team, I was Skinnier -- if you can believe it -- than I am today. No; for real. I didn't freshen up in the WC after meals or anything; I've just always had a ridiculously high metabolism. Regardless, that didn't stop every coach who ever saw me from swearing on their mother's grave that, with enough time, they could pack on the pounds and turn me into the next Jason Ring. Yeah, he played at Hawaii when I was there -- I mean, he actually played when I was there -- I was stoked to try and bounce balls with Mason Kuo in warm ups. And on that note, nobody won warm ups like Jay Ring (upper deck -- Stan Sheriff Center) but that's another story. Or maybe it's not... Maybe Jason Ring bounced balls like Rosie in Vegas because he possessed a certain level of upper body strength that I have only read about in Men's Health (I have included the Rosie Clip again because it is just that good).

Frankly I've tried the almighty 6-week program that guarantees nothing less than perfect pectoral muscles and unlimited success with the ladies at the local municipal pool - and I think it's all a load of crap. Okay, okay; maybe I haven't. Maybe I've done nothing more than a few push ups before I went to bed each night... you know, trying to get pumped up in order to assist my social agenda. BTW, you need muscle present in order for exercises such as push ups to create that pumped up look, FYI. Unfortunately, acquiring that kind of base muscle structure would require regular visits to this guy's place off of PCH; I'm pretty sure his name is Jim but I have yet to meet him. Either way, one thing I have been able to do in spite of all the strength coaches I have come across in the last 11 years and their endless preaching of the same concept, "Muscle Mass = Good" - is play volleyball. Weird huh? I haven't won an open or anything but I have had some success and all I have going for me in the strength department is some really tight -- yet incredibly explosive -- tendons. Not to take away from the people who actually can arm wrestle, they're able to hit the ball really hard too.
So, I thought I would get to the bottom of what I've been missing out on all these years by talking to the source himself, the guy who (I've heard through the grapevine) did nothing but shoulders two hours a day, five days a week in his down time at Pierce Junior College before he ever arrived at UH. Maybe, he knew how many beach days were available on the sands of Waikiki and he was just making sure he was ready -- why don't we find out?
Talk to me Jay; it's all for the ladies, isn't it?
Well Hans, I need to be honest here. I grew up on a farm watching guys like Hulk Hogan, Bo and Luke Duke and Magnum PI. I watched Movies like Rocky and The Predator (starring a ripped Arnold). I watched Bo Jackson run over the Boz; and you know what all these guys had in Common? Well I do... Muscles. Magnum pulled chics, but not as many as the Duke Brothers, and as for the other guys... I'm sure they did well for themselves too. So Yes, I quickly learned that Muscles helped men drive cars better, chase down bad guys, kill aliens and beat up Russians.. What can I say, I am a product of my own era.
If you were in Tahiti right now; and it was you and 50 absolutely smoking hot Tahitian beauties, how many push ups do you think you could do? Be honest...
About a thousand... No, really.
Okay, let's get more serious for a moment... You're one of the hardest hitters on tour with arguably the highest vertical jump in all of the world? How much of that is natural and what percentage would you contribute to working out in the gym?
Ok, I honestly think most of it is Genetic... I've always been a good jumper. Throughout the last 10 years my vertical jump has gone up a little every year - which I think is a result of: A) 75 percent playing all the time, and B) 25 percent weights. Plyometrics are helpful, but everyone should be careful not to overdo it. On the other hand, I've always wanted to feel like no-one else on tour has "out-worked" me off the sand. I often close my eyes in the gym and think about bitter losses. Nothing motivates me like remembering bad beats.
Would I have done better with the ladies in college if I was ripped?
Hans, you're kinda in a league all your own. I remember you lingering around the weight room showing moderate interest, but never really gettin' after it... This kind of puzzled me. Until this point in my life, I'd never seen anyone so skinny. Granted, you had a pretty live arm, but when coach Wilton was teaching you how to dive, you literally couldn't support your own body weight. I watched the doc stitch up your chin at least 3 times... no? I figured after the 3rd, you would at least do some push ups. However, in some sort of bizarro Superman kind of way, I think you being skinny might have been the exact reason you had success with the ladies...

Describe for the readers a typical day in the weight room for Jason Ring during his lifting heyday and how it differs now; during the 2006 AVP off-season.
I admit... The heyday had a different look for me. I think I was just so excited to have muscles I figured that more and more must be better right??? I would sometimes do 10-12 sets of different chest exercises, 10-15 reps each. It was a bit too much. Now I'm all about balance and core strength. Most of my time is spent on the muscles that chics don't really dig that much. However, don't think I won't sometimes do bench presses before I go to sleep just to remind myself I've still got it...
You were part of one of the most physically intimidating teams in tour history when you partnered with George Roumain in 2004. A lot of people felt that you and big George possessed the style of physical play necessary for FIVB success; and in turn would have better represented the United States at the 2004 Olympic Games in Athens, Greece. Are the Olympics a goal for you today? And if so, how intricate a role would physical preparation play in your decision making?
Thanks! I always think back to that season and wonder what could have happened if George and I would have tried for Athens. I like that style of play and really think it could be successful. My thought has always been that strong physical play and good ball control would be the recipe for success in the future. I always hear from other players that "shooting the ball," should be a bigger part of my game, and I agree. But don't kid yourself, when it comes down to it, I like jumping real high and hitting real hard. I would love to take a shot at the Olympic Games and if I felt like it could be a reality with my partner heading into 2008, I'm sure I would continue to work hard in the weight room as well.
Do you watch Grey's Anatomy on Thursday nights?
I don't watch it... but, my girlfriend makes me Tivo it for her.
If you were to partner up with Hans Stolfus next season on the AVP Tour, how often would spectators get the two of us confused?
Umm... not likely.
You were voted "Most Handsome Man in Honolulu," in 1996 by both Television (K5) and Radio (Hot I-94). You don't have to answer a question here; I just wanted everyone to know.
Is that why you started doing tons of arm curls late in the season??? Making a run at the title in 1997?
I spent last season working out with Rett Larson at Velocity Sports Performance in Irvine, CA and realized for the first time how important extra strength and plyometric training is in relation to success on the AVP Tour. I didn't gain any weight or look any bigger but I felt stronger down the stretch during long tournaments and directly attribute my success to his willingness to help me do more than I ever have before. And let me be clear, I have had the opportunity to work out for years... but not until the work out was sport specific and executed in an enjoyable manner with one outcome in mind (winning), did I realize and fully appreciate its potential. My question for you is: How long have you known what I didn't learn until last summer? And what do you plan on doing differently heading into 2007 in order to keep the love of the gym alive?
Honestly... Here's what I think. The days of bodybuilding and tight buns are just no longer cool. I used to live in Hollywood and it's easy to see that the muscled up jock is kind of out of place these days. In fact, it's probably easier to be on the other side; or skinny - so you can make fun of the gym rats. Truth is, we are professional athletes. It's a good idea to be in the gym doing sit-ups, pull-ups, and everything else. You will perform better if you are stronger. You will play longer if you are stronger. Just ask the Great Karch K. He works harder than anyone for sure; but you're right in thinking that biceps and pecs are basically worthless for spiking. Young players should be working on core strength and flexibility in order to build better (overall) muscle balance and stability.
You know what; I've got a good story to close. I once played professional indoor volleyball in Vienna Austria and a huge part of my daily routine was lifting weights. While I was there, someone asked, "Which muscles are most important for Volleyball?" My immediate reply was, "The ones that look the best." Well, to say the least, things have changed a bit. I'd like to think I'm a little smarter now in the gym. Which if you break it all down is probably the most important thing to a long, successful career. But if that doesn't work, you'll find me doing preacher curls about 4 times a week... for sure.

Five Tips with Sean Scott
By Sean Scott
November 9, 2006

What skills immediately transferred over from the HardCourt to the Beach?
The fundamentals are very similar. How you make contact with the ball for bumping, setting and serving all transferred over immediately. As did my eye-hand ability.

What new skills did you have to improve on?
Because the indoor game has six players you are able to hide weaknesses and build particular strengths. You can be a big net player where you are able to put the ball down and block your opponent, however you may lack the ability to pass or set well. For me, I had to work on improving my all around game. Unlike the indoor game, I am involved in every single point on the beach. I need to be able to block, dig and set on every play. All of my skills needed improvement.

What is the biggest difference?
The biggest difference is two-fold, the elements and the two person team. Having to play with the sand, wind and sun is obviously a huge change from indoor. And being responsible for hitting the ball at least once every time the ball crosses the net is also a huge difference.

What is the biggest similarity?
At the end of the day, it's still volleyball.

Why did you cross over?
When you finish playing College Ball and want to pursue Volleyball as a professional, you are given two choices, indoor or beach. I had been playing indoor my whole life and while I loved it, what could be better than getting paid to play on the beach. You hear about the lifestyle repeatedly and it is all true. I am at the beach nearly everyday playing and training. The sport is great and the atmosphere could not be better.

Give five tips for the Indoor Player that helped you be the most successful on hard court

1. Balance -- As in every sport, make sure that your center of gravity and balance are always in check. With good balance, you will be able to jump higher, recover faster, pass smoother and hit the ball harder.
2. Pepper -- Peppering may seem like a mindless way to warm up, but it is actually a very good tool in learning how to improvise when hitting. It forces you to work on your hand-eye coordination.
3. Repetition -- To improve at any skill you need to practice it over and over again. Only at that point will be you be able to convert consistently when the game is on the line.
4. Accuracy -- As you are practicing your angles and line shots put greater emphasis on hitting you spot than on spiking the ball.
5. Enjoy Yourself -- At the end of the day this is sports. It should be fun and a stress reducer.

Hot Topics: Share Your Thoughts
November 14, 2006

The 2007 AVP schedule will feature 18 events. With the ability to set up an event in any type of venue we want to know:

What city should the AVP add to its schedule?

Should major cities such as Boston, Philadelphia, Charlotte, Seattle, Portland, St. Louis, Dallas or San Francisco be added to the schedule?

Should the AVP return to San Diego, Belmar, Honolulu or Austin?

Email comments@avp.com to share your thoughts on what city the AVP should visit and WHY. Make sure to include your name and home town.

We have received over 500 emails on what cities the AVP should visit. We will continue to read every email and publish your thoughts throughout the next week. Check back daily to see what AVP Fans are saying...


Michigan, Michigan, Michigan, Michigan, Michigan, Michigan, Michigan, Michigan, Michigan, Michigan, Michigan, Michigan, Michigan, Michigan, Michigan!
Brent Doble - AVP Star from Michigan


You should include Dallas. You will have all the amenities of a major market, a ton of volleyball junkies and to top it off, the awesome Texas weather (excluding that little mini tornado that came through the last time you guys were here)
Michael, Dallas


Think of the fantastic venue opportunities that exist in the Bay Area: you could take it back the Embarcadero in downtown San Francisco, and what about the hills surrounding the Cal Berkeley campus? How about Lake Merrit in downtown Oakland? Can't you just hear Geeter belting out "This is the AVP, and we're live in Oak-town!... the 5 and Dime, the Biggety-Biggety-O"? "Rosie's Raiders have come back to the home-country". The possibilities are endless.
Jonathan - Oakland


Why the LOU? I for one love it for not only the volleyball, but for Paul Mitchell...yeah I am a stylist!!! Seriously, it has been a while since it has been in the STL and there are sooo many people here who enjoy volleyball too. It would be awesome to have it here and of all years with us being the World Series Champions. Having volleyball here too would only make this one of the best sports years ever for us volleyball fans. St. Louis has the best fans ever!
Amanda - Smithton, Il

Please come back to Austin. AVP made a huge difference in this city
Marcus - Austin

I might be the only one from Salt Lake City to write in, but I know I'm not the only one that feels like the AVP would benefit from being here. I hope you consider us, Jake Gibb would. Take care!
Brandon - Salt Lake City

Philadelphia! Sean Rooney is my cousin and I will get such a big crowd to root for him all his opponents will be scared
Jake - Philadelphia

I have been a huge fan of the AVP for many years now. I love every minute of it, but I am still waiting for the day that I see them live in Washington, D.C. The nation's capital deserves to host the greatest sport ever.
Charles - Washington DC

Why not come to Minneapolis, Minnesota! With over 10,000 lakes, how can you go wrong???
Kathy - Minneapolis, MN

Karch Kiraly on his Off-Season
By Matt Zuvela
November 16, 2006
Karch Kiraly wrapped up his 28th season on the beach in 2006 and proved that even at forty-five years old, he is still one of the best players on tour. Although Kiraly missed a few tournaments due to a knee injury suffered part way through the season, he and his partner Larry Witt finished in seventh place twice and took home a fifth place finish at the beginning of the year in Fort Lauderdale. Kiraly also spent some time in the broadcast booth for the televised men's and women's finals throughout the season.

When you think off-season, what is the first thing that comes to your mind?
The great one-on-one workouts with my coach Mike Rangel. He and I still get together one or two times a week and we have a blast just down at the beach by ourselves. In fact, those are some of the best months of the year at the beach. We have the beach all to ourselves.

How important is having a good off-season routine in terms of staying healthy and strong for the next season?
It's crucial for me, because I'm 46, and I need to try and keep myself in the best condition possible. I figure once I stop and lose it, I'll never get it back. I've got to just keep working out.

When do you start looking forward to the next season?
Around February or March, I start getting excited about actually competing. But I really enjoy just the training and the preparation work. How can you not? You're at the beach! So I enjoy my time at the beach working out. I'll be doing a little coaching for this next season in the spring at the high school where my two boys go to school. That will be a new experience for me, too.

A lot of teams swapped up at the beginning of 2006. Should fans expect to see more of that as the Olympics approach or will teams tend to stick together.
I think a little of both. Dalhausser and Rogers, Metzger and Lambert, and Gibb and Rosenthal all feel comfortable with the realignment and how they are competing. Dalhausser and Rogers won an international event for the first time in three years on the men's side last year, and Gibb and Rosenthal just won the last FIVB event of the season in Mexico. All three of those teams are the leading contenders for those Olympic berths. For the other teams you may see some more realignment in an effort to try and find a last minute combination to try and challenge one of those three teams for one of those two berths.

8 Titles Short: Jake Gibb on his latest victory
By Hans Stolfus
November 17, 2006
Hans Stolfus is just 8 Titles Short of being the winningest player in Midwest history. Hans, a native of Iowa, knows that if he plays until 2015 and everyone else retires, he might have a chance to catch Brent Doble of Michigan with five career titles and Jeff Nygaard of Wisconsin with seven career titles. Join Hans Stolfus as he blogs about volleyball, the tour and anything else top of mind. Got a subject you want Hans to cover, you can email him at 8titlesshort@avp.com.
Saturday, October 28 -- 3:47 PM CST -- If memory serves me correct, I was in the kitchen circling the island while peeling an orange that wasn't quite ready to be peeled. You know the kind, where the outside skin doesn't seem to separate from the juicy goodness. Anyway, while I lacquered the hard wood floor with errant citric acid, my phone rang and pulled me away from trying to open a new canister of Lysol Clorox Wipes with one hand.

"Hey. You got a score for me?" (Good friend John Braunstein, a regular in the AVP Qualifier who boasts three 17ths in his career, as Jake Gibb and Sean Rosenthal look for their first FIVB Title)
HS: "Bro. Are you not watching this? It's 8-6 in the 3rd." I was circling the island in the kitchen because I was too nervous to sit still on possibly the most comfortable office chair in the history of time while the Acapulco finals were updated live on the internet.

JB: "No. What? Are you serious?"
HS: "I'm serious. They lost the first 19-21, crushed them in the second, 16. And now they're up 8-6 in the... no, wait. 8-7 in the 3rd. Emanuel just sided out." I actually have no idea who Jake and Rosie served or who sided out for the Brazilian's 7th point, the FIVB Website doesn't help out fans across the globe with an extensive Play by Play like Keith Dobkowski and the AVP. I was forced to merely track the score&and speculate.

JB: "I'm going to have to stay on the phone. I don't think I'm going to make it home in time to get the finish."
HS: "10-8. Dude, I seriously think they are going to do it."

JB: "What is this, their 3rd final? Two in a row? They must be playing unbelievable. Did you see their score against Fabio and Marcio in the winner's semi? 20-18 in the 3rd. Ridiculous."
HS: "11-11. We're getting down to the wire. Do you think they're serving Rosie? You ever talk to Jake about who gets served more on the FIVB tour? Ahhh... crap. 11-12, they just turned it."

JB: "4 POINTS! All they need is 4 points! They better have taken a timeout. They have to sideout here or it's over."
HS: "12-12. They sided out. We're back on track. What would you do here? 12-12 in the 3rd for an FIVB Open Win against the 2004 Olympic Gold Medalists. This is so sick. Wait, what am I talking about? You would hit the cutty. 13-12!!! They just won a real point! Holy smokes, they're going to do it!"

JB: "What?" Kind of high pitched. "Just imagine if they won this point too. They could sideout for the win." Pseudo laughing the entire time in utter astonishment. "What are you eating?"
HS: "Orange. No score change yet. So what would you hit, you still haven't answered me. It has to be your go-to shot. Regardless of the set. 14-12!!! They just won another real point! Are you kidding me?"

JB: "14-12?"
HS: "14-12! They're going to have a chance to sideout for the win!"

JB: "This is unbelievable!" Still somewhat laughing in amazement.
HS: "Do they serve Rosie?"

JB: "I don't know."
HS: "What does he do? He's got to hit it. No way he shoots a ball for the match against the Brazilians."

JB: "What if they win this point? They could win it right now with a block on Rego."
HS: "But they're still going to have a swing for the match, regardless."

JB: "And if they don't win this point right now..."
HS: "14-13. Emanuel sided out." Once again, I have no idea who they served... I'm mostly all about assumptions.

JB: "Ooohhh... 14-13. I guess, here it is. Rosie's got to hit it. Maybe they're serving Jake? Or maybe they served Rosie the whole match and now they're going to go to Jake on match point?"
HS: "All they need is one sideout!"

JB: "Either way, no way they shoot... they have to hit. They cannot shoot this ball for their first FIVB win. Are you kidding me?!"
HS: "No way he shoots this ball. How could he?"

JB: "There's no way."
HS: "Well, Jake pretty much shoots everything half speed anyway so if he gets served, then I could see him going high seam with medium pace. But if Rosie gets the ball, he better jump as high as he can and absolutely deliver the word of God! What if he went Vegas Line for the win? That would be so sick."

JB: "He's got to bring it cross court. Ricardo is like 6'10", he's not going to dive into the angle on match point. So Vegas Line is probably out of the question."
HS: "No way he blocks angle. But wasn't Lambert blocking line?"

JB: "Is this the biggest swing of their careers? Has either of them had to win a tournament on the last sideout of the match? Ever?"
HS: "I don't think they have. In Florida they crushed Stein and Lambo and I'm not sure if any of their other finals came down to the last point. So, yes, this could be the biggest point of their lives."

JB: "I think it is. This is the biggest swing either of them has ever taken up to this point in their volleyball careers. Crazy isn't it?"
HS: "So, if you were in their position, you're saying you wouldn't hit the cutty?"

JB: "No. Jake or Rosie should swing away. I would, of course, hit the cutty. Has the score not changed yet? What, did they take a timeout or something?"
HS: "Listen, I'm hitting refresh every three seconds. They must have called a timeout. Probably deciding who they are going to serve for all the marbles."

JB: "All those Brazilians have coaches right?"
HS: "With a 6'10" monster at the net, who would you go after?"

JB: "I'd go for the ace."
HS: "Of course you would. Wait, I think we're finally getting something."

JB: "They tied it up didn't they?"
HS: "15-13!!! Holy Crap! They did it!"

JB: "No way! It's over?"
HS: "Final Score."

JB: "Well, they did it. Jake and Rosie are the front runners for the Olympics."
HS: "This puts them in pole position for the FIVB going into 2007."

JB: "Unbelievable. I can't believe it."
HS: "This is a huge deal when you think about it. The fact that we (Americans) only get to play a certain number of events and each one of them next year is going to count towards Olympic Qualification."

JB: "I know. I think they've got the best shot. Hey, what do you think they did for the match?"
HS: "Rosie...Vegas Line."

JB: "Yeah. Rosie...Vegas Line. Sick. Late."
HS: "Late."

If you think any of that was even remotely fabricated, you are sorely mistaken. John and I happen to be two of the biggest beach volleyball fans on the planet, and we both happen to be pretty good friends with Jake so when you combine the two -- even if the tournament we're discussing is in Mexico -- the results can be devastating.

Don't get me wrong here, there was more at stake that afternoon in Acapulco than a good friend's first international victory. You see, Jake and Rosie had something very cool written across the chests of their extra small/small FIVB singlets, and that something happens to be the most profound acronym ever created, U.S.A. Perhaps readers of this will find that to be a tad clichéd. And hell, in today's political struggle taking place across the globe, where American fans aren't exactly gracing the stands, it's quite possible that the role as the "Ugly American" is far more popular for our athletes than one of historical representation and altruistic pride.

But that aside, anyone with a brain in their head should be able to comprehend how special it is to represent one's country on an international platform; especially when it's for the greatest athletic nation in the world, the United States of America. And to take that even one step further, Jake and Rosie not only placed U.S.A. before their own names on the scoreboard but they succeeded while doing so for only the second U.S. Men's FIVB Gold Medal since June of 2003. Pardon my verbiage, but that is just sick.

So, I guess I am making it pretty obvious how important it is for me to one day be able to represent my country. Maybe it will never be in anything as dramatic or inspiring as the Olympic Games but to have the United States hand me a jersey and say, "Go Spike One Home Son" would be... wait, they wouldn't really be sending me off to World War II would they? Well, let's just say it would be quite an honor. For teams like Jake & Rosie, Phil & Todd and Stein & Lambo, the 2008 Olympics in Beijing are far more of a reality than say, a dream too good to be true.

The problem is that only two of those teams will dawn the red, white and blue when the Chinese curtain comes calling. And the qualification process currently takes place on the aforementioned international juggernaut known as the FIVB. Makes sense huh? Why wouldn't our athletes play Brazil, Germany, Switzerland, China and Italy en route to the finals in order to determine the Two Best American Teams? No, in fact it does not make sense, but at the moment it's all we've got.

We can go on talking about a better solution all day long (like I am here) but until something changes, we are forced to accept the FIVB's present format. Would an Olympic Qualification Series here in the United States be the best solution? Perhaps. But at the moment it's similar to discussing life in college football with a playoff system instead of the BCS. Or wishful thinking...

Either way, it's very easy for a guy like me to be critical and write whatever I want about it because it doesn't directly affect me. So, in the good nature of continuing to interview my friends... I thought I would talk a little bit about the whole process with the man of the hour himself, Jake Gibb.

Jake, you know I can't start with anything else -- what are the chances you wouldn't mind filling us in on what took place during match point for your first international tournament victory?

Hans, it was a point I will probably never forget - Rosie brought the hard heat off the top of Ricardo's block and Emanuel couldn't control the touch - or was it, wait a second... Come on bud, you know that I can't just give up all the goods. Plus, I kind of like a little mystery behind it. I've got a better idea, why don't you sub Q1 with this:

Jake, were you nervous on match point at 14-13 in the third for your first international tournament victory?

And the answer would of course be, absolutely. I think if an athlete doesn't feel their nerves in that situation, they must be dead. Rosie got served and he sided out like he had all match long. He has really stepped up lately in pressure situations.

You started this AVP season with a win at the $50,000 Cuervo in Fort Lauderdale and ended it with a $32,000 FIVB win in Acapulco, Mexico... Forget the dollar figures for a second and explain which tournament victory was more gratifying and why.

Opening up the AVP Season with a win in Fort Lauderdale was incredible to say the least. But at this point, right now, I would have to say the win in Acapulco was better. We had something like 8 second place finishes after our win in Florida. We were super hungry for our second win together and to be honest (maybe even a little dramatic), I don't think I would have come home from Acapulco if we had taken another 2nd. That win relieved a lot of pressure and stress.

While only competing in 6 tournaments this past summer on the FIVB, you added an additional $106,450 in winnings. Suddenly, your 2006 season has become even more impressive. Now, combine that with the $187,050 the two of you made on the AVP this past season and we come to see that financially successful careers in the sport of professional beach volleyball can, in fact, be a reality. Simple math allows me to determine (I used a calculator) that your overall volleyball income for 2006 - minus endorsements - equaled $293,500 as a team. Did you ever think, even for one second, that you would be earning that kind of cold hard cash playing a game on the beach only a couple of years ago, when your skin tone was even whiter back in Utah?

That was a long question. No, I never thought I would be here. My wife and I had an agreement when we moved to California that if I wasn't ranked within the top 20 teams on the AVP that I would pursue a different career. I felt like becoming a "top 20 team" or more importantly, exempt from the qualifiers was a reasonable goal, but one that I would certainly have to work hard for. Hard to believe now but yes, that was my mind set as a qualifier living in Utah.

Speaking of endorsements, if I were to link on to the Speedo Website, would I be able to buy a fresh pair of boardshorts that have their very own name catered to 2005 MVP Jake Gibb? Say, like "The Big Nasty."

Good timing for this one. I am fortunate enough to have just agreed to a long term extension with Speedo and I couldn't be more stoked about it. The last thing I want is for this to sound like a shameless sponsor plug but there really is something to be said about having a support structure as loyal as Speedo. Not to mention the new beach gear they are putting out is some of the best stuff I've seen in years. Check out their website when you have a chance. No personalized boardshorts yet though, sorry...

In the athletic world today, is there any achievement greater than representing your country at the Summer Olympic Games? It's the one sporting event I can watch for two weeks straight with no interruptions, I'll say that much. And more importantly, can you picture yourself standing in the heart of National Stadium during opening ceremonies in Beijing, China, representing the stars and stripes?

For now I'm really looking forward to the start of the '07 season. Thinking ahead too far in advance gets my head all screwed up... so I am going to somewhat dodge that question.

Don't get yourself in trouble here if you don't want to talk about it but do you think that some sort of Olympic Qualification Series (possibly five tournaments with the top eight teams) here on our home soil presents a more logical path towards determining the two most deserving teams to represent the U.S. at the Olympic Games?

A system like that has both positives and negatives. To start, a team that does well against other American teams isn't always going to do the best against international competition. It's a different style of game over there. On the flip side of that coin, I do like the idea of a "Qualification Series" that consists of just a few tournaments because that creates more high pressure situations. Generally, the players that can handle that kind of stress when the time comes to step up are the ones that are going to succeed. The Olympics is a one time, one shot, pressure cooker... so I think we could definitely put our best American teams out there that way.

And last but not least, I have watched the Vegas Line video a couple of times (Shocking, I know -- I only attach it to every article I write and sometimes twice) and I noticed that you kind of turn off the net and head to the service line before Sean even makes contact. Were you under the impression that basically the set was so good that it could have bounced itself? Because it was absolute butters...

First of all, why you continue to pluralize the word "butter" when referring to a nice set, I'll never know. I am actually much more impressed when Rosie hits over the block to the back line. He does that better than almost anybody and it is absolutely untouchable.

Does Misty May-Treanor cook on Thanksgiving?
By Matt Zuvela
November 20, 2006
Misty May-Treanor and her husband Matt Treanor are not strangers to being apart for long periods of time. Misty spends nearly 20 consecutive weeks on the road traveling to tournaments around the world during the summer, while Matt is a catcher for the Florida Marlins and plays about 80 away games a year. Fortunately, their off-seasons are pretty close and they will get to spend some time together this winter, whether it is at the gym training or out on a cruise in the Caribbean.
You and your husband travel almost non-stop during the spring and summer. What do you look forward to the most about being together in the winter?
It's very hard to stay in the best shape that I can because the window is so small, so we like working out together. And we're looking forward to our cruise we're going to take in the off-season! I'm so excited, and we love to get waited on. We're going to the Caribbean, so for us that is the best vacation ever. Cell phones don't work, computers are too expensive... it's great.

You've mentioned in interviews that you like to cook. Do you have Thanksgiving at your house?
You know, I leave that to my in-laws. We kind of do two Thanksgivings. We have one at a family friends' house, so we hit that early. By the time we drive out to Riverside to be with his family, we're hungry again. So we get two Thanksgivings. I leave the cooking to everybody else.
Are the Olympics always on your mind or do you ever get a true break to stop thinking about it?
Once I leave the beach, I have a general rule. Whether I'm eating dinner with my dad, or friends, or whatever -- no volleyball is spoken. I would say I start thinking about the Olympics in the off season as motivation for training.

At tournaments during the season, you are used to having long lines of fans with autograph requests. Does that die down at all during the off-season?
It does. During the off-season, I'm in Florida where we live. And it's pretty low-key. No one really knows me down there yet. It's very nice, and that's why I love living down there. There's kind of less distractions. Not that I mind, but I get my workouts done and my friends can't call and say 'Hey! What are you doing tonight?' But I appreciate all the fans and their support.

You mentioned that during the last off-season you changed your training program a little bit. Are you going to stick with it this year?
Yeah, I work out at Cris Carter's FAST program in Coral Springs, and with my trainer Eddie Winslow. I go to Body Works at Coral Springs and I do Pilates twice a week. I might do a little yoga too, because I think that would be good flexibility work. The older I get the stiffer I get, so I'm going to still maintain that. That's why I like going back to Florida because it's warm enough for me to get out on the sand and run and do what I need to. I felt like my regimen was great last year, I came in really good shape, so I'm going to continue.

When you look back on your indoor career, what stands out in your mind as especially significant?
Definitely winning the NCAA championship for the 49ers at Long Beach State with -- I would call them my family -- my teammates in 1998. I miss indoor, but it would be hard for me to play indoor because we were a family and those were my sisters. There will never be another team like that that I feel a part of. That definitely was significant. It was our last season. There were five seniors and it was very, very special for us.

If you could partner with a non-volleyball player...
By Colleen Murray
November 27, 2006
We've all heard of the multi-sport athlete. Deion Sanders pulled off professional careers in baseball and football. Michael Jordan, after arguably the best basketball career ever, tried his hand at minor league baseball. So we asked some AVP players: what athlete outside of volleyball would you choose as a partner and why?
"LeBron James. I really like him. I think he'd be able to pick up volleyball. He's really athletic." Brooke Hanson
"If I could choose any athlete playing now, from any sport, I would say Kevin Garnett. There are a couple things I really like about him. I like his loyalty. He plays for the Timberwolves and they are just getting crushed! They've been getting crushed, for I don't know, what, 10 years now? And he's had opportunities to leave and he has stuck with them. And I really admire that. His loyalty is second-to-none.
"He's a phenomenal athlete and not only is he a phenomenal athlete, he works on the things that he needs to work on. He's great at rebounds. He's great at everything he does because he will go and work on the little things. And those are two huge things to find in a partner. He's just an incredible teammate. I'd love to play with him." Ryan Mariano
"Allen Iverson. He's AI, too. Since we have the same initials, I say that I should get him out here. He's a pretty experienced athlete, so I think he could pass along the wisdom." Ashley Ivy
"I'd play with Rob Blake, the hockey player. He's like 6'5, he moves well, he's huge, he's a good athlete, he's a fun guy to be around, and he enjoys the beach lifestyle. I think hockey players are underrated as athletes." Aaron Wachtfogel
"Michael Jordan. I think he'd probably side out pretty well. He's a good athlete and he's quick. I could see him being a pretty good volleyball player." Phil Dalhausser
"I'd have to get someone to match up with Phil Dalhausser, so I'd probably get Kevin Garnett. He's about 7 feet, arms down to the ground, and if you bring him out here, he could learn the game in a month and be out here winning tournaments." Sean Rosenthal
"I wouldn't mind playing defense behind Shaq. Give it a try and see how he looks out there. It'd be pretty hard to get around that guy. I think he'd be good at blocking, lots of blocking." Matt Olson
"Michael Jordan. He's just a great athlete. He did basketball, then baseball, and then basketball again. He could play anything." Janelle Ruen
"Kevin Garnett. He's tall, lanky, really quick, even though he's 6'11, he's agile. He'd be the greatest blocker." Ty Loomis
"Amare Stoudamire. He's like 7 feet and he's athletic." Nick Lucena
"Shaquille O'Neal. He's just got such great charisma. You can tell that he really loves to play basketball, that he really loves to compete. The guy's just a monster. He's big, he's athletic, and he's a showman."Anthony Medel
"Reggie Bush because he's just sick and because he went to USC.."Hans Stolfus
"Kevin Garnett. He's so big that it would be really fun and he's incredibly athletic. To play with him would be great." Saralyn Smith

Kerri and Casey celebrate their first anniversary this weekend
By Matt Zuvela
November 28, 2006
Kerri Walsh wrapped up another fantastic season on the beach in 2006. Domestically, she and her partner Misty May-Treanor won fourteen titles. Walsh was also crowned Goddess of the Beach at this year's event in Las Vegas. Walsh is married to fellow AVP player Casey Jennings, and as their one-year anniversary approaches, she shared some of their off-season plans and also talked about defending her Olympic gold medal in 2008.

You and Casey were married on December 4, 2005. Any plans for your one year anniversary?
Casey Jenning and Kerri Walsh embrace after they both won in Seaside Heights last summer 
We'll be in La Quinta, near Palm Springs, where we got married. And we're going to go to Lake Tahoe for Christmas. We've spent New Year's there for the past six years, so we'll be there from Christmas to New Year's.


Do you actually get on the slopes?
I'm really terrible and I feel like I have too much to jeopardize getting on the slopes. Casey loves it. He goes out and rips it up. I make snowmen and I have fun in the snow.

Now that the season is over, what do you guys do on a normal weekend?
Basically be with family as much as possible. We travel so much during the season, so we just like to be home. Casey's brothers live in LA and my family is not too far away up in northern California.

As the defending gold medalist, do you ever get to relax or do you always have 2008 on your mind?
Always on my mind. Right after 2004, we decided we wanted to do it again. It's a long process -- qualifying starts in 2007 -- but if we can do well next year it makes it so much easier for 2008. It takes the pressure off a little bit and we can just focus on getting better. So it's always there. Beijing is huge. The gold medal is such a motivating factor.

Based on what you've seen so far of the international competition, what kind of qualities do you think the teams will have who make it to the gold medal match?
I think they're going to be very consistent and not make a lot of unforced errors. And be very aggressive. I think those are the three key elements.

Fans get to switch from watching beach volleyball to watching indoor during the winter, how has the indoor game changed since you were a part of it?
I haven't watched it in so long. There's a lot of different rules [since I played]. The libero wasn't there, and the overhand passing on the serve is different. It's interesting. I think every year, the athletes get taller, bigger, and stronger and hopefully we'll be able to see some of those faces out on the AVP soon.

Hot Topics: Share Your Thoughts on Olympic Qualification
November 28, 2006
Qualification to represent the United States in the 2008 Olympics in Beijing will begin next season. Two Men's and two Women's teams will qualify for the Olympics. Qualification is determined by a team's 8 best finishes point wise on the FIVB tour between January 2007 and July 2008.
Headed into the 2007 AVP Season, several top teams have stated their desire to bring home gold including Misty May-Treanor and Kerri Walsh, who hope for a repeat performance of 2004. The Men's side saw three teams in 2006 rise to the top in the fight for the two spots: Jake Gibb / Sean Rosenthal, Todd Rogers / Phil Dalhausser and Mike Lambert / Stein Metzger. However, several teams on both the Men's and Women's sides have plans to grab one of the available Olympic spots.
The Hot Topic on the Beach is: Should Olympic Qualification for the United States Representatives take place domestically against American players to determine the two best teams or should it continue to be determined by international play on the FIVB tour?
Email comments@avp.com to share your thoughts on how qualification for the Olympics should happen. Make sure to include your name and home town.

Childhood Dreams and Beach Volleyball Part I&II
By Hans Stolfus
November 30, 2006
Hans Stolfus is just 8 Titles Short of being the winningest player in Midwest history. Hans, a native of Iowa, knows that if he plays until 2015 and everyone else retires, he might have a chance to catch Brent Doble of Michigan with five career titles and Jeff Nygaard of Wisconsin with seven career titles. Join Hans Stolfus as he blogs about volleyball, the tour and anything else top of mind. Got a subject you want Hans to cover, you can email him at 8titlesshort@avp.com.
Thanksgiving Day -- Cruising home for the roast-beast-feast... and ham and turkey and stuffing and potatoes and corn and green beans and rhubarb pie -- all covered in delectably refreshing cranberry chutney. Gorgeous. I miss home. I really do. Nothing profound about that statement. Yes, it's Iowa. Yes, it's cold. Yes, the Hawkeyes absolutely suck this year and our wonderful quarterback, Drew Tate, should never be allowed to take another snap behind center, but besides all that, its home. I guess the only problem with the annual pilgrimage to the heartland (where those Chevy commercials actually hit close to home) is the sentimentality that is drudged up by viewing my life as it was before I ever discovered who I might actually like to be. Not that it was that bad, don't get me wrong. Good wholesome family values there in Iowa, let me tell you. But opportunities to venture off the beaten path are few and far between and every time I pick up a photo from my childhood, the blond hair and puffy cheeks take me back to a time when the mere idea of writing novels for a living was nothing more than a top-secret fantasy.
At least I can say this; regardless of my location in life, I've always wanted to write the great American novel. Not to be confused with, "I believe I am a good enough writer to actually write the great American novel." Disillusioned I am not. Hell, I sometimes read and re-read the crap I put together for my blog and wonder how on earth I managed to place a present progressive immediately following a past participle in a sentence that contains three different tenses. Accident? God, I hope so. But more importantly, these grammatical lapses define a simple yet unfortunate reality -- the 'Great American Novel,' written by my hand, is probably going to be a bit of a stretch. I guess that's why it's still a dream.
And now that I think about it, isn't it kind of sad how many of us give up on our dreams as a child? It always seems to be right around the age of 13 -- give or take. There must be something about becoming a teenager that allows us to lose sight of these romantic, innocent, visions of grandeur. To be honest, I've never actually desired a residency at University Hospital or a spot on NASA's latest space shuttle Discovery, so relatively speaking; it has been quite easy to keep my dream alive.
Will my sweet dream to better Dan Brown ever really lead to financial success? Probably not, but who's counting? Is it possible that there are others also squabbling away their last few pennies for the sake of keeping that nostalgic dream alive? I mean really, how many kids hold on to their youthful aspirations even one day after their thirteenth birthday? That's got to be the real question.
Why don't we ask Jeeves...
78% of all children give up on their dreams exactly one day following their thirteenth birthday. No, just kidding, Jeeves turned out to be a total buzz kill.
Obviously the next question would be; when do kids start dreaming of a lovely life on the beach as AVP Professional Tour-ists? I wouldn't know, that's why I'm asking. Iowa doesn't produce a plethora of surf/sand grommets if you know what I'm saying...
Anyway, where do you go when you want a better answer? Friends and colleagues, that's where. I don't know why I didn't start with a Q & A, some of these answers are just fantastic...

Angie Akers -- Good friend and Notre Dame Alum.
When you were 13, what did you want to be when you grew up?
I wanted to be a pilot for Delta Airlines. (I have no idea why Delta!)
Can you remember at what age you gave up on that dream?
I think I gave up on that dream a few short years later. Then, strangely enough, I wanted to be an eye doctor, but realized I would have to deal with the eye infections and problems, not just the corrections.
And, at what age did you decide you were going to pursue the beach volleyball dream?
To be completely honest, I never had the dream of becoming a beach volleyball player. When I was 25 years old, working at Lehman Brothers in San Francisco, I realized that sitting at a desk in an office all day long was not for me. It wasn't necessarily beach volleyball that I wanted to do, but the sport provided an immediate avenue to get me out of the office. It just so happened that I fell in love with the game and decided to make it my full-time job/passion.

Matt Olson -- Good Friend and 2005 Teammate.
When you were 13, what did you want to be when you grew up?
The only thing that was on my mind at that time in my life was to become a professional surfer. I wanted to travel around the world surfing contests and doing photo shoots for my sponsors.
Can you remember at what age you gave up on that dream?
At the age of 16, I sprouted to over 6 feet tall. Which at the time I felt was a little too much height for a professional surfer, being that my friends were all hovering around the 5'5" mark. In addition to my size, I remember a cold winter with the ocean temperature ranging from 55-60 degrees limiting me to a full suit, booties and a hood each time I surfed. At that time I made my parents very happy by joining the La Costa Canyon volleyball team and haven't looked back to this day.
And, at what age did you decide you were going to pursue the beach volleyball dream?
Becoming a member of the AVP Tour was a quick dream' transition for me. However, I didn't truly feel it was obtainable until my sophomore year in college when I qualified for the Huntington Beach Open with Shawn Burke. After I got into that event, I had a whole new mindset and my goals became entirely beach volleyball related.
 
Kerri Walsh -- World's greatest beach volleyball player ever! Her opinion is credible...
When you were 13, what did you want to be when you grew up?
An Olympian
Can you remember at what age you gave up on that dream?
Still chasing the dream: 2008 Olympic hopeful.
And, at what age did you decide you were going to pursue the beach volleyball dream?
I decided to commit to beach volleyball when I was 22. My first 6 months in the sport were terrible and not fun at all. I had a gut check half way through the season, talked it out with my mom, and decided that I would fight for my goal of becoming a professional beach volleyball player (a much better fit than having a 9-5er). Six seasons later I am living that dream.
 
Aaron Wachtfogel -- 2006 Teammate and proud Peanut Butter Jelly Time Member.
When you were 13, what did you want to be when you grew up?
When I was thirteen, I wanted to be a beach volleyball player. I wanted to be a beach volleyball player when I was two, I think. The age of thirteen was an interesting time for me. I still loved basketball and just so happened to be about four feet eleven inches tall. I know, hard for you to believe. During the winter I wanted to be Bobby Hurley of Duke more than anything and when summer rolled around, I wanted to be Brent Frohoff or Karch or Lewy or... well, anybody that could beat down Sinjin and Randy. I used to sit by the banner on center court all day long at the Manhattan Open, before there was "reserved seating." I reserved my seat by begging my parents to get to the beach by seven thirty everyday. Come to think of it, I probably woke up earlier for the Manhattan Open then I did for Christmas. Needless to say, you can scratch those next two questions, I have never given up on my beach volleyball dream.
 
John Hyden -- Two time indoor Olympian and fellow San Diego State University Alumni.
When you were 13, what did you want to be when you grew up?
When I was 13, I wanted to grow up to be 6' 9". I gave up on that dream when I became 6'5" for three years in a row. No, for real... When I was 13, I was a freshman in high school and figured out that I wasn't going to get a scholarship to college for basketball or soccer so I decided that my path was going to be volleyball. I guess from then on, I just kind of knew that all I wanted was to go to the Olympics. Hans, if you work hard you can do anything!
Can you remember at what age you gave up on that dream?
Never gave up on that dream. Even when Fred Sturm told me that the Olympic team was already pretty much set when I joined.
And, at what age did you decide you were going to pursue the beach volleyball dream?
I decided to pursue beach at age 29. Four years of training with Doug Beal pretty much broke down every muscle, bone and joint in my body! I thank him for helping me limp every morning when I get out of bed.

April Ross -- 2006 AVP Rookie of the Year and 26-time All American at USC. Fight on.
When you were 13, what did you want to be when you grew up?
Honestly, I never dreamed of becoming anything but a professional athlete. I used to hate that question when my teachers (or whoever) asked me. Usually, I'd make up something I felt was more socially acceptable like, marine biologist; but I don't think I even really knew what that was. I had yet to pick up volleyball but I was pretty good at soccer so I guess at that stage in my life, my dream was to play for the U.S. soccer team.
Can you remember at what age you gave up on that dream?
I gave up on being a pro soccer player after I started playing the awesome sport of indoor volleyball and found out that I actually had some talent. No question, I was hooked. I never thought about soccer again.
And, at what age did you decide you were going to pursue the beach volleyball dream?
I decided to pursue a life on the beach two years ago, (22 yrs old) after I got hurt playing indoors. On top of that, I was more than burnt out on ever playing in a gymnasium again. I had to sit out the 05 AVP season because of minor surgery, but once I dug my toes in the sand last April, I've only wanted to do one thing.

Julien Prosser -- Australian 3-time Olympic Beach Volleyball Representative, former partner of Irvine's newest police cadet, Mark Williams, and all around cool guy...
When you were 13, what did you want to be when you grew up?
I wanted to be an Aussie Rules Football star. You know a real champ type guy. You Yanks, might not be aware of the game. Best game in the world to play and watch if you don't mind getting your head knocked in occasionally and the old knee reconstructed. It's not rugby either for your ignorant readers. This game actually requires brain cells, technical skill, fitness and athleticism.
Can you remember at what age you gave up on that dream?
Everything changed when I went to Rio de Janeiro for the World Championships in 1990 as a 17 year old. The tournament was nothing but hanging out on the beach watching Brazilian girls in their hungry bum bikinis and drinking beers with Sinjin, Randy and Hovie/Dodd. It certainly beat the "fun" times my mates were having at home looking for summer jobs at the end of high school. If you would like to skip the third question, that's when I started the long journey on the beach. I was living my dream then and there.

Brooke Hansen -- Santa Barbara native formerly known as Brooke Niles before she took the plunge...
When you were 13, what did you want to be when you grew up?
When I was 13, I wanted to be Shamu's trainer at Sea World. After seeing the show for the first time, I thought it would be the greatest job in the world. To be honest, I don't think I have actually given up on that dream quite yet... You see, my sister just recently visited Sea World and as it turned out, I got really jealous and pissed off that she didn't take me with her... I'm pretty sure that means I still want the job.
And, at what age did you decide you were going to pursue the beach volleyball dream?
As for the beach volleyball thing, I have always wanted to play beach for as long as I can remember.

And the Winner is...
December 1, 2006
Your voice has been heard and now for the results as AVP Fans voted for the 2006 AVP Awards

Most Valuable Player
Misty May-Treanor received 51.5% of the vote. Kerri Walsh finished second with 33.6% of the vote. The fans agreed with the players as both chose May-Treanor as the 2006 MVP of the AVP.
Todd Rogers received 36.7% of the vote. Phil Dalhausser finished second with 33.6% of the vote. The fans agreed with the players as both chose Rogers as the 2006 MVP of the AVP.

Best Defensive Player
Misty May-Treanor received 51.9% of the vote. Holly McPeak finished second with 33.1% of the vote. The fans agreed with the players as both chose May-Treanor as the Best Defensive Player in 2006.
Todd Rogers received 42.2% of the vote. Casey Jennings finished second with 32.4% of the vote. The fans agreed with the players as both chose Rogers as the Best Defensive Player in 2006.

Best Offensive Player
Kerri Walsh received 61.8% of the vote. May-Treanor finished second with 29.5% of the vote. The fans disagreed with the players who chose May-Treanor as the Tour's Best Offensive Player in 2006.
Matt Fuerbringer received 61% of the vote. Phil Dalhausser finished second with 26.4% of the vote. The fans disagreed with the players who chose Dalhausser as the Tour's Best Offensive Player in 2006.

Rookie of the Year
Jennifer Fopma received 43.4% of the vote. Stacy Rouwenhorst finished second with 27.1% of the vote. The fans disagreed with the player who chose Logan Tom and April Ross as Co-Rookies of the Year.
Brad Keenan received 53.3% of the vote. Mike Morrison finished second with 26.3% of the vote. The fans agreed with the players as both chose Keenan as the 2006 Rookie of the Year.

AVP MVP Todd Rogers discusses his off-season training routine
By Matt Zuvela
December 4, 2006
Todd Rogers had the best year of his career in 2006. Rogers partnered with Phil Dalhausser and together proved to be one of the best duos on tour. Together they won eight titles on the AVP Tour and became the first American team to win an international title in three years. Rogers was also named God of the Beach at this year's Las Vegas individual tournament. Rogers and Dalhausser are definitely in contention for earning a trip to the 2008 Olympics for the US, and as Rogers discusses in this week's player interview, the road to the Olympics is not an easy one.

They call you the Professor -- what do you put your brain towards during the off-season?
I try and do as much mindless stuff as I can since I have to think so much during the season (laughs). Actually, I kind of do. I like to just hang out with my kids, play soccer, play volleyball, swim, or whatever it is with them. I like to surf, so hopefully my kids will get into that too. It will give me a good excuse to take them out and get out myself. I'll exercise my brain -- I like to read -- but as far as thinking about volleyball, that won't really come until March. Well, maybe February at the earliest, when we start talking about strategy.

So you start shifting your focus from one season to the next after New Year's?
Yeah, definitely. I continue to train really hard, but I do take a little bit of a break and drink a lot of wine -- I like my wine. But come December, I'm back in the weight room and back on the track doing my sprinting and all that stuff. Kind of just trying to get a nice, good base to prepare for January and February when I start hitting.

What kind of things to you like to do on your actual break when you aren't training at all?
I like to take two vacations. One with my wife and kids, like a camping trip. And then hopefully one with my wife, even if it's just a weekend up to Napa or something simple like that. We might even come down to Manhattan Beach and have a little wine tasting with [AVP CEO] Leonard [Armato] and Holly [McPeak]. I don't have any crazy surf trips or anything like that planned, unfortunately. I don't think I could get away for an entire week. My wife might shoot me after being gone so much during the season.

The Olympics are about a year and a half away. Is that a long way down the road, or is it coming really quickly?
We've got to start thinking about it pretty heavily. You've really got to be sure you are ready for those big FIVB tournaments -- the Grand Slams and World Championships. The smaller ones it's good to do well in, but the points in the big ones are probably going to determine who gets the Olympic bids -- unfortunately, in my mind. This happened to Sean [Scott] and me in 2004. We did way better than everyone else. There was no one that was even close to us, and yet, we weren't representing the USA in Athens because in 2003, Dain [Blanton] and Jeff [Nygaard] had a really good season and Sean and I had not had as good a season -- Sean had a couple injuries that he dealt with. Stein [Metzger] and Dax [Holdren] had two great tournaments in 2003 -- big tournaments. So all of a sudden, on the strength of those two events, those guys go. And I don't begrudge them anything, they are all good guys, but nonetheless I look and it and go 'man, 2003 shouldn't have anything to do with it.' Really it should only be two or three tournaments with pressure on those tournaments, and ideally it's in the US. I don't like the FIVB having control of it.

So would you prefer seeing Olympic Trials for beach volleyball in the United States?
Absolutely. I'd love to see an Olympic Trials. One (tournament) or a series of four, it's something that would really benefit beach volleyball. And I think that the AVP, USOC, and USAV could (hopefully) come to an agreement on something like that for 2012. I don't know if I'll be in the mix for that, I'll be 38 or so, but hopefully they can get together. Really, that would bring beach volleyball to the forefront in people's minds. Four series trial within two months, hit key markets, huge on NBC, make a big deal out of it... that would really jump beach volleyball to the next level, in my opinion.

What have you improved on the most?
By Colleen Murray
December 6, 2006
Stats may tell us a lot of things, but the pros themselves usually take a different, more subjective view of the strides they've made in the past year. We asked some athletes: where have you improved the most?

"Probably my decision-making. The game has become a little slower for me; it used to be so fast. Now I think I'm making more of the right plays, before it was just instinct. I'd think, 'Oh, I'll do this because that's what I know how to do.' But now, I think I see the game a little better, and make smarter plays. I think my ball control has gotten better, and my passing has gotten a little bit better from getting reps in and doing it over and over." John Mayer

"Taking the game more seriously, I guess. Maybe I practice a little more, a little more organized practice, and I go out less. [Partner Ben Koski and I] just take the game more seriously than we used to." Jeff Minc

"You kind of have to change your lifestyle. It's kind of hard to separate it, but you get to play on the beach and you get to play volleyball, so it's worth it but it's hard to separate your friends and what you do." Ben Koski

"It's hard because I've really learned so much from Holly [McPeak], whether it's the training or the playing or having the winning mentality and just thinking that way every weekend. I think that's been a big thing for me the mentality and just the training, I needed to improve in all areas. I think I have a lot of improvement still to go but I think last year I learned a lot and hopefully it's all coming together a little bit better."Nicole Branagh

"I think my setting has gotten a lot better. For a while, it was a little down, but I think it's better other than that." Keao Burdine

"Maybe blocking. I feel like my blocking has gotten a little bit better. (Keao says, "I agree!" in the background.) I'm notoriously known for not being a great blocker. I feel like I'm not taking big strides but baby steps. I feel like I've improved a little bit." April Ross

"I think I've gotten better just moving around in the sand. I used to be a big goofball out there, I may still be a big goofball, but I'm just figuring out how to move, so it's a little bit faster out there in the sand." Sean Rooney

"Probably just learning the game. Making everything a little smaller. I've got a lot of work to do----it's not even funny how much work---but you try to chip away and hopefully get better. That's all I can control: how much work I put into something and how much time. If it goes my way, it goes my way."Logan Tom

"I think my consistency has improved the most. I think I've gotten a lot more experience. That helps the most in pressure situations from having a lot of time in the off-season, training hard, training with great teams like Jake Gibb and Sean Rosenthal and Karch [Kiraly] and Larry [Witt]. I've had a lot of great opportunities to train against them, and they don't train half-speed. It's all or nothing in practice. I think I will just gradually get better and better and better with the opportunity to train against them." Ryan Mariano

Nancy Mason Played with Three of the AVP's Best Blockers in 2006
By Matt Zuvela
December 7, 2006
Nancy Mason played with three different partners in 2006 and appeared in the semi-finals with each of them. Mason began the season with Jen Boss and they placed second twice and third three times. Next, Mason played with Elaine Youngs and finished second at the Manhattan Beach Open. Mason ended the season with Tyra Turner and they finished third in their first tournament together in Brooklyn.

You've had the chance to play with some of the best blockers on tour in 2006 -- Jennifer Kessy, Elaine Youngs, and Tyra Turner. How are they similar and different in terms of their abilities as blockers?
Actually, Tyra, just playing with her in a few tournaments, she's much bigger than Jen or EY. Just how much space she takes up at the net. But she's never been a full time blocker, she's been the defender. So I think her upside is huge. Obviously EY has been doing it all her career and she's at the top right now. But it's fun to play defense.

Who do you think of the newer crowd, such as Keao Burdine and April Ross, is going to be making an impact in the next couple of years?
I think April and Keao are both great players. I think what happens with the young players is they are good friends and they want to play together, and I think that's commendable, but I think there is so much to learn that sometimes they are going to be better off playing with someone with more experience, and then maybe come back together later. I think for those two in particular, maybe they can advance more quickly if they play with a more experienced player. [Mason teamed up with Ross in the FIVB season ending event in Thailand where they finished 17th]

Would you say the same about Michelle More and Suzanne Stonebarger?
Well, those girls are a little bit different because they are all about their chemistry. I don't know how they do it -- that they've lived together for as long as they do and they play together. But obviously that works for them. And they're not as big and dominant as Keao and April, so it's a little bit different. It's a little bit more about their chemistry.

It seems like college players are coming over to the beach quicker. What do you think their crossover from indoor brings to the game?
I think it's good and it's a good sign for the tour, and it's exciting that they want to be a part of the AVP. Obviously the lure of the indoor money overseas is hard to pass up, but that they want to be on the beach is a positive sign.

After being on the road all summer, what is the one thing you look forward to the most when you get to sit at home and do nothing?
Spending time with my boyfriend and watching football.

Who do you root for?
The Chargers and the Rams.

AVP PRO BEACH VOLLEYBALL ANNOUNCES DEBUT EVENT IN CHARLESTON
December 8, 2006
Charleston, SC (December 8, 2006) -- AVP Pro Beach Volleyball Tour, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of AVP, Inc. (OTC Bulletin Board: AVPI), a lifestyle sports entertainment company focused on professional beach volleyball will bring the fast-growing AVP Pro Beach Volleyball Tour to the Family Circle Tennis Center in Charleston, South Carolina. The AVP Charleston Open will take place this summer, June 14-17, 2007. The AVP Charleston Open will kick off with an open qualifier on Thursday, June 14 and continue with the main draw throughout the weekend, culminating with the men's and women's finals on Sunday, June 17. More than 150 of the world's top men's and women's beach volleyball professionals will compete in the tournament to be televised nationally on Fox Sports Net.
A press conference was held today, Friday, Dec. 8 at 12:15 p.m. at the Family Circle Tennis Center in Charleston featuring Charleston Mayor Joseph P. Riley, Jr, AVP Commissioner Leonard Armato, and pro beach volleyball stars Holly McPeak and Stein Metzger.
Charleston is the first new city announced for the 2007 AVP season and will make up one of eighteen events nationwide. The tournament is scheduled to take place at Charleston's premier outdoor facility, the Family Circle Tennis Center. AVP's Charleston debut features an integrated partnership with the Family Circle Tennis Center which will actively promote and present the event. The Family Circle Tennis Center will be responsible for selling all local revenue for the tournament, including tickets, concessions, sponsorships and hospitality, with AVP maintaining control over all of its assets. Tickets will be available for purchase in late March on the official AVP website (www.avp.com).
"We are excited to bring the AVP Tour to Charleston," said Leonard Armato, CEO and Tour Commissioner. "The AVP is proud to be included as a premier sports event in a city that is home to the Family Circle Cup and the inaugural Ginn Tribute. We are thrilled to be working with the Family Circle Tennis Center and we look forward to bringing the excitement of the Tour and beach volleyball to Charleston."
"This is a big win for Charleston. The AVP Tour brings a third major sporting event to Charleston, and will really stand out as something special in this city," said Bob Moran, Director of Sales and Business Development -- Family Circle Tennis Center. "This venture is the product of our commitment to continue to bring important events to Charleston. We're very happy that the AVP recognizes Charleston's ability to support an event of this caliber, and we look forward to another exciting year on Daniel Island."
The AVP Tour is comprised of the best men's and women's pro beach volleyball players in the U.S. and the world. Featuring more than 150 of the sport's top competitors, the Tour includes world-class athletes such as 2004 Olympic gold medalists Kerri Walsh and Misty May-Treanor as well as other Olympic medalists and professional stars like Holly McPeak, Eric Fonoimoana, Elaine Youngs, Dain Blanton and Karch Kiraly, who won the sport's first gold medal in Atlanta. The AVP's main goal is to deliver its fans the experience of an amazing athletic contest surrounded by an unforgettable beach party.

Jeff Nygaard on Fatherhood and the Superbowl
By Matt Zuvela
December 11, 2006
Jeff Nygaard is another one of the AVP's expectant fathers, as his first child is due next month. However, he has been exposed to the world of fatherhood first hand through his partner, John Hyden, who's first child was born near the beginning of last season. Nygaard will have a busy off-season as he balances life with a new baby on the way with training for 2007, and he shared some of his thoughts with us on fatherhood, staying in shape, and his pick for the Superbowl.

After watching some of the other players become fathers, do you feel like you have a better idea of how to balance the life of a dad with the life of a player?
It's more of an all encompassing thing. There are conversations I've had with a number of people who have been through it or are going through it, where they've prepped me for certain situations that were so far off my radar. Hearing those things... it's pearls of wisdom. Someone who has survived that situation. It's the unknown -- you're going into it and it's your first kid. I've heard somebody say that your first born is your every mistake. You gear up for all these things, and you're going to be so tense because it's your first one. So yeah, I'm worried about it, but at the same time I know it's going to work itself out. And then just having these guys talk me through these situations takes a lot of those fears away. It's going to be stressful, but I know I'll get through it.

Was it hard for you knowing that your partner John Hyden was due to have his first child in the middle of the season? Was that something you had talked about before you started playing together?
No, it was not a problem. We talked about it, and before we even started to partner up I asked him 'What's the situation with the kid? What's going to happen?' They had a birth coach who was going to be there whether John was there or not to help with the process. But it was a nice situation where he didn't have to worry about the whole thing. He was free to focus on volleyball to bring home some bacon.

At what point do you really start training seriously for the 2007 season?
I usually end up taking a month off from all physical activity, which ends up driving me nuts. Then I start weight training and plyometric training. The off season is where you make the biggest gains, because it's the gains that keep you strong throughout the whole season.

Is it difficult to balance training too hard and being burned out when the season starts with training too little and not being prepared when it's time to play?
I think that is situational, person by person. When I was on the national team, I got used to training four hours a day, five days, or sometimes six days a week, and traveling for three weeks of the month, eleven and a half months out of the year. Literally during the off season, I am going nuts, because we have six months to play and then six months off. And I'm still not used to that transition. I'm still not used to having that much time off to do nothing. It kills me! I hate that! I have to have something to do, and I need to be busy. Training is my stress relief more than anything else. That's what I do.

Care to make a prediction on record about the Super Bowl?
Oh yeah -- Green Bay Packers.
Over who?
Who cares?

Which AVP Pros do you watch to help improve your game?
By Colleen Murray
December 14, 2006
When there is a break in the action at any AVP event, a spectator may be served well to look around at his fellow fans. There could be rising beach volleyball stars sitting alongside, absorbing what they can from current pros. We asked some of the tour's newer players: do you watch any players on the AVP Tour and try to learn from them?
"Oh definitely, I probably started coming to events as a fan in 2001, 2002. I thought Karch [Kiraly] was at the end of his career. He is one of the best ever, so I was like, 'I gotta watch him every time I come out here.' You figure, how many more events is he gonna play? So I thought, I gotta see him every time I can. And he's a great guy to learn from. So I would always try to watch Karch.
"I love watching Todd Rogers. I'm a little guy, so I like watching the little guys. Todd does everything the right way.
"I love watching Stein [Metzger]. Stein takes the game so seriously, he's like a real professional." John Mayer
"I spent a lot of time watching Stein, and I spent a lot of time watching Karch. I think everybody has. Those are the two players that I would really like to compete like. I think Stein is an incredible defender and does a great job siding out and has a lot of energy about him.
"I think Karch is just Karch. He's just fundamentally sound and so consistent that it's ridiculous. Those are a couple of things that I wanted to try and take from them and I'll continue to learn from them as I watch them now." Ryan Mariano
"I grew up in Northern California and beach volleyball isn't really that big. Then I played indoor and I only really focused on indoor. But I always saw the magazines and Holly [McPeak] flying through the air hitting balls, so I knew like Holly and Elaine [Youngs] and Kerri [Walsh] and Misty [May-Treanor], obviously." Nicole Branagh
"I usually watch the short guys because I'm pretty short. Todd Rogers is good. It's amazing to watch him play because he's not my style but he has such good vision. He can put the ball wherever he wants. Casey Jennings mixes it up really well. I watched Albert Hannemann play a lot. He's got everything you need to side out. You could take something from everybody. I'm still learning." Aaron Wachtfogel
"I never watched beach volleyball. I tend to stay away from any sort of volleyball when I'm not playing. Just take a break. You play it so much, you're around it so much. You need a break, well, I need a break. Some people live it all the time, but I can't do that.
"But you have great players out here. You can take EY's blocking, Holly's defense, and Misty's siding out. Look at Kerri, she's an indoor player, look where she is now. You can just pick and choose." Logan Tom
"It's kind of funny, but I always watch the guys jump serve, but not a lot of girls jump serve, Carrie Dodd does a pretty good jump serve, and I've been able to play with her in practice and play against her, but the force that the guys put behind the ball, I try to imitate that, I mean, it's kind of hard to control it right now but I'm just trying to make it strong.
"I learn a lot from the girls on defense. For the women's game you have to be able to read more and move more than the guys so I'll watch the women play defense, like Holly, and Holly does a really good job and Barb Fontana." April Ross
"I'd like to have the ball control like Peter Jordan has or the jump serve like Aaron Wachtfogel." Ben Koski
"I like Aaron Wachtfogel. He's our inspiration really. He's 6'1 and he is siding out like a god. Aaron's kind of my hero." Jeff Minc

Five Tips with Jeff Nygaard
By Jeff Nygaard
December 15, 2006
What skills immediately transferred over from the hardcourt to the beach?
On a certain level, every skill carries over from the indoor to beach.  The fundamentals of each are relatively the same from one discipline to the other, but with some variances.  For example, blocking indoor and beach requires you to align yourself in front of the hitter.  The difference lies in the timing and the reading of the play.  Indoor, you of course have to read the hit, but if you just get up big and over the net, you're doing the majority of blocking correctly.  Beach also requires you to get in front of the hitter, but you have to be able to read the timing of the hit.  Whether you need to wait and swat a roll shot or get over quick to seal off the hit depends upon your ability to read what the attacker is doing.  Just an example of the similarities and differences.

What new skills die you have to improve on?
I had to improve my beach game.  My overall knowledge of beach was very limited and I just need experience from playing time in the sand.  Have you ever noticed how the more experienced players always are in the right spot.  That isn't luck, that has taken them a long time to develop.  Specifically, I really had to improve my setting ability.  Beach sets have to have no spin which is not required for the indoor.  Even though I was a good indoor setter, I need to develop beach hands with a deep dish.  That took awhile.

What is the biggest difference?
The biggest difference between indoor and beach is the overall ability of the players.  Indoor, if you have a weakness, you can hide it and use one of the other 5 players on the court to either cover it or compensate.  On the beach, if you cannot do one skill, you will get absolutely abused for it.  For example, if you can crush any ball and get kills but cannot set a thing...you will not see one serve all day long to make you set your partner.  There is no way to hide a weakness.  The best rounded players are the most successful.

What is the biggest similarity?
The only real true similarity between the two is that it is still volleyball.  I love playing indoor.  I put 16 years into the game and it does and always will make sense to me.  But beach is a challenge that I love trying to overcome.  I still get to play the game I love, it's just that I have a lot less teammates to play with.

Why did you cross over?
I made the change after the 2000 Olympics.  I left volleyball to come to California to try and pursue another chapter in life.  While waiting for the fall quarter to begin, I started playing on the beach for fun, and that fun was what was missing for me with indoor.  And once I started enjoying myself again, I devoted myself to it and have not looked back since.

Give five tips for the Indoor Player that helped you be the most successful on the hardcourt:
Hard work.  If you are having trouble with a particular skill, keep doing it after practice until you find it.  Demand that of yourself.
Be aggressive.  Being tentative will teach you bad habits that you'll never end up using in matches.  It will only hurt your game.
Once you enter the gym, be focused.  If you are peppering at 50% because your thinking about something that happened earlier (or just not focusing), you are teaching yourself bad habits that will show up on the court.  Every touch of the ball should be the best you can.
Once you leave the gym, unless you're at a volleyball meeting, leave it behind.  Don't carry things around thinking about a bad play that happened.  Let it go and come back the next day with a fresh out look.  You cannot change what happened anyway, just learn from it.
Have fun.  If you are not enjoying yourself on some level, why are you doing it?

How would Casey Jennings / Kerri Walsh fare against Sean Scott / Rachel Wacholder?
By Matt Zuvela
December 20, 2006
Casey Jennings is one of the most recognizable figures in beach volleyball. He is also married to one of the sports biggest celebrities. Jennings and his wife Kerri Walsh were married on December 4, 2005 and as their one-year anniversary has just passed, Jennings discusses his training in the off-season, how he and Kerri would do against other beach couples, and tells us the best way to watch the Super Bowl.

How did you and Kerri spend your anniversary?
We went down to La Quinta. We're going to try and do it every year. Go down on the same day, and maybe get a bunch of friends or family, whoever wants to come.

Any plans for Christmas and New Years?
We go snowboarding every year in Lake Tahoe. We go up there for ten days or two weeks. Relax and enjoy time away, just being in the mountains in the snow, with the fire chilling with some beers. We love it. We'll do it every year the rest of our lives.

Once the New Year rolls around is that when you start thinking about training?
Might be a little later this year because it's going to be another long season, so maybe the middle of January.

With the 2007 season just a few months down the road, what does your training schedule look like? How much time do you spend on the beach? And in the gym?
In the off season I spend minimal time on the sand. Jogging twice a week in the deep stuff so that when January comes its not such a shock to the body. I lift twice a week focusing on building strength in my legs, squats, cleans, straight legged Deadlifts etc. with my trainer Tommy Knox. I also do Pilates twice a week with the fabulous Lauren Rauth. I love it!


What does January look like in comparison to February and March?
In January, we start the steady climb of working out five times a week, lifting twice a week at fast twitch, Pilates twice a week, playing on the sand five days a week. The difference from January to February and March is a secret that I like to keep to myself. I can't give you all the goods!!!

In Canyon Ceman's article in DiG Magazine, Canyon reported that you and Matt Fuerbringer will most likely end your four year partnership entering 2007. What made the two of you so successful for so long?
Hard work and communication were the key elements for Fuerby and me. Dane Selznick did such a good job on building our confidence with repetition and keeping us focused on the basics.

What moment sticks out as greatest in the Casey-Fuerby run?
No one thing sticks out in mind because we endured so many things together. That is the coolest thing about playing with one guy for so long, not to mention one of my best friends. All the memories good and bad! They are all stored in the memory bank and you get share them with each other for life!!!

If the AVP were to stage a battle of the couples, how would you and Kerri do against Sean Scott and Rachel Wacholder?
What do you think? We would give them a Smishing! Yes I said Smishing! hahahaha I have to bet on Kerri and I. Who knows? Let's find out in 2007 Vegas!!!

How about Jen and Aaron Boss?
AB and Bossy? AB could take me out of my game by making me laugh. I wouldn't bet on us in that match.

Put these in order of importance on Superbowl Sunday: cold beer, big screen, TV commercials, and John Madden.
How about fifty yard line, cold beer, and then I'll go watch the highlights after I watch it live. That's what we do every year. Super Bowl Sunday we're there, for three years. We go with Gatorade.

Care to make a Superbowl prediction?
The Saints are going to win, but I would really like to see Peyton get his dues. Peyton just needs to get his defense to drink some more Gatorade!!!

Goals for 2007!
By Colleen Murray
January 2, 2007
Because being a beach volleyball player is easier on the body than indoor, it lends itself to long careers for its athletes. As a young player on the AVP, it seems like there's plenty of time to reach your long-term goals, but we asked young players about the short-term: what would you like to accomplish during the 2007 season?
"It'd be nice to kind of lock down an Olympic berth next year. If we played well enough on the international side, we could lock down an Olympic berth, so that would be good. And I'd like to win a tournament in Florida." Phil Dalhausser
"I would love to consistently finish in the top 10. I got my first ever fifth this year and I would like a few more of those, possibly a third, a finals eventually one day. I like small goals." Matt Olson
"Play more consistently." Janelle Ruen
"You always want to win a tournament, be in the top five, and make more money so I don't have to get a real job. My family and friends have those, and I don't want one." Nick Lucena
"My goal this year was to be in the top 10 teams. The hardest thing out here is to be consistent in finishes. We were flirting with the top 10. We were 8 or 9 for a while and now we finished at 14. But we've been pretty consistent so I'm pretty happy. My two partners this year, Ed Ratledge and Kevin Wong, have been really good. They've done a lot of off-season work. The ultimate goal is the Vegas Tournament. Then you've been the most consistent. Also, to make the Best of the Beach Tournament. Those are two definite goals. Another goal is to consistently get 9th place and higher. I want to give myself a chance to compete on Sunday." Ty Loomis
"I want all top 10 finishes next year." Hans Stolfus
"To make some of the post-season tournaments. This year was my first year even going to Vegas to watch but we'd like to make the tournament next year." Brad Keenan
"To improve upon my finishes from the previous year. I don't like to set lofty goals, just to keep having fun. I want to keep playing with Fred [Souza] and I want to keep improving."Anthony Medel
"It's very hard to measure your goals in terms of finishes. It's beyond your control. I like to focus on things in my control, like my skills. I want to build more muscle and strength and get more explosiveness. That's stuff you'll always want to work on in your career. Next year, I'd like to come out with a tougher serve and a better hand serve. Ideally, I'd like to be making it to Sundays. We've finished ninth but seventh plays on Sundays." Saralyn Smith

2007 Schedule to Include New Tour City: Glendale, Az
January 3, 2007
Glendale, Arizona (January 3, 2007) -- AVP, Inc. (OTC Bulletin Board: AVPI), a lifestyle sports entertainment company focused on professional beach volleyball, today announced a multi-year agreement with The Ellman Companies to bring the fast-growing AVP Crocs Tour to the new Westgate City Center in Glendale, Arizona to be titled the AVP Westgate Open.
Glendale is the second new city announced for the 2007 AVP season (Charleston, S.C. was announced on Dec. 8, 2006) and will make up one of 18 events nationwide. The tournament is scheduled to take place May 10-13, 2007 on the WaterDance Plaza at the Westgate City Center, just steps away from the entrance to Jobing.com Arena and University of Phoenix Stadium.
AVP's Glendale debut features an integrated partnership with Westgate, which will actively promote and present the event. Westgate Live, the marketing, sponsorship and events arm of the Westgate development, will be responsible for selling all local revenue for the tournament, including tickets, concessions, sponsorships and hospitality, with AVP maintaining control over all of its assets. Tickets will be available for purchase in late March on the official AVP website (www.avp.com).
At a press conference today, Ellman Companies Chairman and CEO Steve Ellman, Glendale Mayor Elaine Scruggs, AVP General Manager Gabby Roe, and AVP Professional Beach Volleyball Stars Rachel Wacholder and Sean Scott announced the agreement.
"This week brings the Tostitos Fiesta Bowl and BCS Championship Game, and the Super Bowl is only a year away," said Ellman, developer of the Westgate City Center. "We are pleased to continue to make Westgate the sporting capital of the Southwest by adding another world class event with the AVP Pro Beach Volleyball Tour."
"We are excited to announce this new partnership enabling us to bring The Westgate Open, and all of the excitement and competition of the AVP Crocs Tour to our fans in Glendale, AZ," said Roe. "We look forward to working with the Ellman Companies and the City of Glendale to continue expanding both our local footprint in Arizona as well as the overall popularity of the sport of pro beach volleyball."
The AVP Westgate Open will kick off with an open qualifier on Thursday, May 10 and continue with the main draw throughout the weekend, culminating with the men's and women's finals on Sunday, May 13. More than 150 of the world's top men's and women's beach volleyball professionals will compete in the tournament, televised on Fox Sports Net.

Pro beach volleyball shifting play from Tempe to Glendale
4-year run in East Valley ended over money; tour's new digs are expected to add support to W. Valley's claim as regional sports
Scott Wong and Katie Nelson
The Arizona Republic
Jan. 4, 2007 12:00 AM

The AVP Pro Beach Volleyball Tour is saying goodbye to the East Valley and hello to the West Valley, reinforcing the fast-growing region's claim as the sports capital of the Southwest.
After a four-year run at Tempe Town Lake, the AVP Crocs Tour is making a stop this spring at Westgate City Center in Glendale.
The sports and entertainment complex is just north of Jobing.com Arena and University of Phoenix Stadium, where the Tostitos Fiesta Bowl was played Monday night and the BCS national title game will take center stage next Monday."We are successfully moving the entertainment pendulum and sports pendulum to the West Valley," said Westgate developer Steve Ellman, who announced the five-year deal Wednesday with Glendale Mayor Elaine Scruggs and AVP General Manager Gabby Roe. "This was a natural fit for this environment." advertisement 
The 223-acre center hosted thousands of people for its first New Year's Eve celebration and will put on several bowl parties in the coming days.
The mother of all sporting events, the Super Bowl, will be played at Glendale's stadium in 2008. And two new Cactus League baseball facilities will be built in the West Valley over the next few years.
Meanwhile, Monday's spectacular Fiesta Bowl marked the first time the Valley tradition was played in Glendale. Tempe had hosted the game since 1971.
The three-day volleyball tournament, which will be renamed the AVP Westgate Open and will feature some of the best volleyball players in the world, will take place May 10-13. Up to six sand courts, including a 5,000-seat stadium, will be set up in Westgate's eastern parking lot. An interactive village with food, beer and sponsorship booths will sit in the complex's water fountain plaza, just steps from the entrance to the hockey arena.
Ellman and the Association of Volleyball Professionals also will team up and use proceeds from the tournament to refurbish volleyball courts at Glendale's Saguaro Ranch Park.
Although Westgate doesn't have Tempe's man-made lake, Roe said, he wasn't concerned with the prospects of having players compete in a concrete lot.
"We have done successful events next to oceans, lakes, rivers, and retail and entertainment venues like this," he said. "We loved the event in Tempe. . . . We have no bad feelings about Tempe whatsoever, but what Glendale and Westgate had to offer was too perfect for us to pass up."
Tempe had a five-year contract with the Los Angeles-based tour. It was a smoking deal for the volleyball promoter. AVP paid nothing for the site, and the city and Tempe Convention and Visitors Bureau picked up nearly $90,000 in costs for things like sand, court setup and teardown, and police, trash and other city services.
The AVP and Tempe started renegotiating that contract in June 2006, but talks ended in December after the city proposed that the AVP pick up event costs. As a result, the AVP bowed out of holding the event at the lake for the final year of the contract.
"It's an awesome event. From the time it opens up to the time it closes down three days later, it's great exposure for the city," said Travis Dray, Tempe's deputy manager of recreation services. "But at what cost? It came time that it wasn't worth it."
More than 150 of the world's top men's and women's beach volleyball pros will compete in the tournament, which will be televised on Fox Sports Net.
AVP's Sean Scott, who was part of a team that won the Tempe tournament in 2004, said competing in the shadows of Glendale's pro hockey arena and football stadium gives greater credibility to a sport that has seen its fan base grow by nearly half in two years.
"It helps legitimize the sport," said Scott, 33, who attended Wednesday's news conference with his girlfriend, Rachel Wacholder, another AVP player. "We get to play where all the big boys play."

Manhattan Beach Open: Free or not?
Council decides to explore possibility of charging all spectators, but that's just the start of the process. Proposal also needs the approval of the California Coastal Commission.
By Andrea Sudano
DAILY BREEZE
After years of complaints about lost revenue and vague threats to abandon the mostly-free Manhattan Beach Open, owners of the tournament have persuaded the City Council to at least explore the possibility of charging admission for every spectator at upcoming tournaments.
But the Association of Volleyball Professionals shouldn't celebrate a victory yet: The council's decision is just a small part of a lengthy process of Planning Commission public hearings, subcommittee meetings and an appearance before the California Coastal Commission, which has the final word on what happens on California beaches.
"I like the partnership that we have with the AVP, but I like what they've done for the sport," Councilman Mitch Ward said. "We were interested in exploring paid admission, if it would make AVP profitable in a sense."
Since 1993, the Coastal Commission has allowed the AVP to charge admission for nearly a quarter of its attendees, like corporate sponsors and courtside seats.
But AVP executives said that number is no longer enough for solvency. The Manhattan Beach Open has lost hundreds of thousands of dollars every year since 2001, with a loss of about $509,000 at last year's tournament alone, said Chief Executive Leonard Armato. Tournaments in Manhattan Beach, Hermosa Beach and Huntington Beach are the biggest financial duds of all AVP stops, he added.
"The irony is that where volleyball began, or at least blossomed for sure, the events in these markets are the least profitable because of these restrictions," Armato said.
But for AVP to be able to charge more visitors for admission, the association's first stop is the City Council, which must ask the commission for an amendment to its Local Coastal Plan, a set of guidelines for coastal development and use.
Then if the commission approves the city's new plan, Manhattan Beach can work out a new number in its contract with the association.
Many beach volleyball purists, such as Dennis "Duke" Noor of Hermosa Beach, have long argued charging admission at the Manhattan Beach Open would keep away attendees or commercialize the beach.
"I think the AVP is trying to take more of an advantage of the right they already have on the beach," he said. "That beach belongs to the taxpayers and the regional citizens of the whole area."
On Tuesday when the panel voted in favor of exploring charging admission to all attendees, none of the council members expressed an inclination toward allowing AVP to charge every attendee, but many liked the idea of better controlling how much the association can charge at the city's event.
"To me, this goes back to local control," Ward said. "The Coastal Commission reviews a lot of stuff in the city of Manhattan Beach. ... Let's take that control out of the Coastal Commission by saying now we'll allow 100 percent, knowing we'll never allow that."
Councilman Jim Aldinger, himself a former coastal commissioner, lobbied heavily for some of his colleagues to work with the AVP to find a suitable number of attendees to charge admission, arguing the panel would never approve a blanket 100 percent figure.
In February, the Coastal Commission is slated to hear AVP's proposal to charge 100 percent paid admission at the Hermosa Beach tournament.
That decision could serve as a barometer for the commission's generosity if the Manhattan Beach Council opted to ask for more control over admission fees, council members said Tuesday.
In the meantime, the subcommittee will work to find an appropriate figure, and the city's Planning Commission will hold a public hearing on the topic. The City Council will then have final say over whether or not to approach the Coastal Commission for a change this spring.
Armato certainly hopes it does. After all, the AVP could always pull out of the tournament completely.
"Of course, but that would be something that would be a last resort," he said. "There's no way you can continue to sustain a business that loses money every year. Clearly, we'd like to resolve this sooner rather than later. ... But we couldn't go on losing money in perpetuity."
Noor isn't worried. He believes the Manhattan Beach Open will continue to thrive with or without the AVP.
"The tradition is a tournament without grandstands, gawky announcers, blow-up dolls and minimall-like atmosphere," he said. "It was a fun tournament where the grand prize was a case of beer and maybe a burger at the local diner."

8 Titles Short: Hans Stolfus Takes the Ultimate Volley Trip (Part I&II)
By Hans Stolfus
January 4, 2007
You know how surfers are always circumnavigating the globe, creating epic films while playing their acoustic guitars aboard "The Crossing" by Quiksilver? Well, I feel like it's about time that we play a little catch up. No, for real. I know beach volleyball is not even in the same category of cool as surfing but for the love of all things holy and decorated with lights, we play a game on the beach! Who on this lonely planet doesn't think the beach is beautiful?
-- Actually, I hate being my own antagonist, but I did recently speak with someone here in Minnesota who informed me that beaches are: A. Dirty, B. Cold, and of all things, C. Sandy. True story. Sandy! Wait, she used the word cold first! What the... ? It's 18 degrees outside today in the fine entrepreneurial city of Minneapolis. Just a half step out the front door and my nose hairs immediately begin to crystallize. And the beach is COLD?! I'm not sure I've ever really needed to communicate with people who create sentences of that nature. I should have picked up my things, pretended to hear a cool new song by Stereophonics and danced my way to the door.--
Where was I? Oh, right... international volley trips for the sake of beauty and existentialism. Unfortunately, such trips would probably not include the voice over narrative from "Endless Summer 2," the Jack Johnson soundtrack from "The September Sessions," or even the film editing from "Flow, The True Story of the Surfing Revolution;" which I just happened to stumble across on YouTube. Each of those requires something known as a budget. And we all know...
I don't even need to finish that sentence.
So, without a camera, or a guitar, or a big group of dudes with wavy long hair and cataclysmic, facial sun damage... I recently partook in my very own southern hemisphere volley trip. It's going to catch on, mark my words.
First stop: The French Melanesian island of New Caledonia. Don't ask, I don't know either. It's a three hour flight from Auckland, New Zealand. And I'll be damned if its not one of the most beautiful places to volley in the known world. Matt Olson and I were lucky enough to be invited by the director of volleyball New Caledonia, Gerard Denaja, to his little unknown paradise in order to participate in their once-a-year professional beach volleyball festival. Flights, accommodation and food - paid for. Post party at Kevin Ces and Fabien Dugrip's favorite watering hole built on stilts over the Pacific Ocean (LA BODEGA) - on us. Small price to pay for remarkably inspired inspiration.
Local New Caledonian teams were joined by representatives from Tahiti, New Zealand, Australia, France, Brazil and the U.S. Oddly enough however; we were labeled in the tournament brackets as E.U. The first guess that sprang to mind was 'European Union' but after further investigation, we discovered that the French pronunciation of the United States was simply, Etats Unis. Cue NBC for some music, a star and my favorite phrase growing up, "The More You Know."
Although our particular exhibition was held downtown in the city of Noumea, there was plenty of stunning tropical beauty to be soaked up. Just ask Kirk Pittman from New Zealand. -- I'll find his email address and attach it at the bottom.--
Eva (New Friend from New Caledonia) 
Finals Match in New Caledonia featuring me hitting 
And on that note... credit where credit is due. New Zealand's very own Jason Lochhead and the aforementioned Kirk Pittman took home the title and beat us down in the finals, 15-13 in the 3rd set. 2,000+ fans, a local band and a group of impressive "Brazilian" dancers were there to witness the culminating match of the tournament.
And... we pooled the prize money from the finals. Suckers.
Second stop: Sydney, Australia and a little piece of its own paradise known as Manly Beach. Matt returned home to his directorial coaching position at Wave Volleyball Club in San Diego and left me to compete with Australia's most notorious beach volleyball legend, 3-time Olympian Julien Prosser. For those of you who don't know, Julien was Mark William's partner in the 2004 Athens' Games; where just a couple of points could have won them bronze and a celebratory party that would have no doubt included shrimps on the barbie.
Australia is a great country. It really is. It's like California before the 36,132,147 people decided to buy up every inch of property available and then torch through it like a hybrid breed of Ecuadorian super termites. I got that from a movie, "Lucky Number Slevin." Sorry. Good movie by the way... or perhaps I was just enamored by the high definition picture on my new 40 inch Sony Bravia LCD flat screen television. Just a little unsolicited advertising. You know how it is. -- And Thank You John Hyden. -- Wait, is Sony a sponsor in 2007? I don't want to waste my shout outs.
Nine days is not nearly enough time to spend in a land as therapeutic as Oz. Either way, I found a way to make the most of it while I was there. Julien and I practiced extensively (twice) before getting behind the wheel of the greatest automobile I can honestly say I have ever been fortunate enough to rest my legs in. The "Volley Van" is like I nothing I could ever describe on paper. Four statements litter the external paint job: "Play Beach Volleyball," "Get Fit!" "Have Fun!" "Meet Friends!" No, for real. But that's not it. The appropriated website, "BEACHVOLLEYBALL.COM.AU" is printed across each side and the back! But wait, it doesn't stop there! If you don't have a computer handy, pick up your mobile and dial direct: 1300 VOLLEY! I added the exclamation point. It needed one. Don't even think for a second that we didn't attract the most bazaar stares every time we stopped for petrol. Whatever. Volley dorks -- nothing new.
Victor Anfilof 
Volley-Van 
* Short explanation: Victor Anfilof runs the "Sydney Beach Volleyball School" and uses the "Volley Van" to transport his beach equipment to and fro. And his clinics are worth more than just a shout out - take a trip, get some sun, listen to cricket on a.m. radio... and volley with an FIVB professional and his well trained staff. Seems like a no-brainer to me.*
Let's just say, for five hours+ each way, that van didn't even hiccup let alone skip a beat. And neither did the newly formed partnership of Stolfus/Prosser. That is, until the first set of the tournament finals against the FIVB World Tour's 12th ranked team, Andrew Schacht and Josh Slack. In order to avoid utter embarrassment, I will refrain from mentioning the score during the first set's technical timeout. What's funny is, and almost slightly ironic, the perfect placement of the song: "It's a Long Way to the Top if You Want to Rock and Roll" by the DJ.
That's basically when things started to take a turn for the better. Sure, we ended up losing the first set 13-21, but somehow we built enough momentum to carry us to the final point of the second set; a Julien Prosser kong block on Andrew Schacht that sent it to three, 26-24. The comeback didn't stop there. A couple of blocks, a couple of aces, and a whole lot of dancing led to a 3rd set 15-13 victory and a celebration that would have probably been more appropriate holding a Gold Medal on Bondi Beach in 2000. We weren't afraid to hug it out. And I'm not talking about one of those super awkward hugs that Todd and Phil fluster through each weekend - you know, where they want to hug each other but they don't want to hug each other, and then they both realize that Phil is 7'2" and Todd is 5'8", so hugging is probably not the most logical way to celebrate their 400th win because Todd will really be wrapping his arms around Phil's waist and it might not be good for their television image, so they both decide to simultaneously pump their arms up and down frantically as to take the public attention off the fact that they're not hugging.
Either way, it was an absolute honor to play with Julien. We won the only tournament we played together and I'll go to the grave with that incredible memory. Here's hoping he doesn't hang it up quite yet and I get a chance to see him on the court during another southern hemisphere volley trip that has not yet been planned.
Thanks be to Matt and Julien for participating in my 2006 Volley Trip Down Under.
And what's best is, we did all of that in time for me to fly home, see a little snow, visit the folks for Christmas, open a couple of unbelievable presents and share a few stories with the people I love. Oh, the holidays...
Happy New Year to you all! May 2007 be the best year of your lives with a trip to somewhere tropical that has beaches lined with nets!

Team Gorgeous Prepares To Make Big Splash in 2007
By Colleen Murray
January 9, 2007
When Suzanne Stonebarger and Michelle More are playing together, it's hard to miss. Not only are they attractive, they are usually followed around by a gaggle of adoring AVP male interns. The interns have dubbed the pair "Team Gorgeous." The women couldn't help but play along with it.
"It's flattering. I think there's a lot of beautiful girls out here. I just think that we're really personable and that's why we get called that," More said.
Their looks aren't the only things that have been getting the Nevada-Reno graduates noticed. More and Stonebarger only started playing on the AVP Tour in 2004 but already have two 5th place finishes under their belts. The two look to continue their success on the beach into 2007.
One of the big factors in their rapid progress is the fact that they work so well together on and off the court.
"We have fun. I think that's the most important thing: to keep the chemistry by having fun. We're best friends," Stonebarger said.
Their solid friendship prompted Stonebarger to move back to More's native stomping grounds, Southern California, after graduating from college. They didn't consider playing beach volleyball when they moved and actually took a year off from the sport. However, being solely spectators at AVP tournaments changed the women's minds.
"When we went to local events, we thought, 'Oh, maybe, we could start playing.' But at first, you're intimidated and embarrassed because you're not that good," More said.
After seeing the qualifiers, the women couldn't resist giving the beach a try; however, it didn't come easy. In 2004, the pair played in nine tournaments, but the highest they reached was 17th place.
"When we first started playing, it took us a while to get in beach shape," Stonebarger said.
The next year was a bit more fruitful with the partners netting one 9th place and four 13th places. The women really buckled down following the 2005 season.
"In the beginning, it was frustrating not doing that well, but we worked really hard in the off-season so we weren't really that surprised at how well we did in 2006," More said.
The rest of the tour, however, was taken by surprise. In the season's first tournament in 2006 in Fort Lauderdale, Fla., More and Stonebarger earned their first fifth. They matched that high mark in Seaside Heights a few months later. The two see their finishes as a logical extension of their growth as players.
"I think team chemistry is huge. We kind of grew together. I think that experience was what we lacked," More said.
Their opposing personalities have served More and Stonebarger well on the court.
"I think we're opposite when it comes to playing. I'm like a fiery fireball kind of player. I think that balances with Michelle. She's pretty mellow," Stonebarger said.
During this off-season, More and Stonebarger are hard at work improving their game. The duo has instituted a new diet focused on increasing their energy levels to combat fatigue that set in at the end of tournaments in 2006. Both believe that better diet will lead to increased energy levels later in tournaments.
"I felt we got a little tired at the end of a long tournament and maybe made some mental mistakes we wouldn't have made had we had more energy," More said. "I can't wait to get on the court next season and finish off those close games we didn't pull out [in 2006]."
"We are going to kill our bodies and get in the best shape of our lives [for 2007]," Stonebarger said.
Although there are some interns who might find that hard to imagine, it's nearly a sure bet that as the young players continue to improve, the interns won't be the only ones watching out for them.

Eric Fonoimoana Discusses How Fatherhood Has Changed His Outlook
By Matt Zuvela
January 11, 2007
Eric Fonoimoana is one of a few players on the men's side to become fathers in the past few years. Beach volleyball requires a serious commitment, and it can be tough to make the adjustment to having a child in the midst of trying to stay in shape. However, after becoming a father, Fonoimoana is adjusting just fine.

When your son was first born, was it difficult to balance being a volleyball player and a new father at the same time?
It was extremely difficult. The number one thing was the sleep. Before Tucker, I slept nine to ten hours a day, easily, non-stop. If I was interrupted, then I'd get it on the back end and I'd go for eleven hours. It was a big change, but its amazing how your body will adjust and adapt to the situation.

Now that he's gotten older, is it easier?
Way easier. He sleeps about ten to eleven hours during the night, and two naps a day for two hours each.

When you had a child, did it change your approach to the game at all?
No, it hasn't changed it at all. It's just that afterwards (if I lose), I'm not so mad when he's around. When he's there and I happen to lose, it's really not that big of a deal as I used to make it.

How long does it take you to get out of one season and start looking forward to the next season?
I usually don't do anything until January. I'll have my partner before January, but as far as getting prepared for the new season, early January is my target date.

What would you say is a bigger part of your training during the off season: strength and conditioning or getting out on the sand and playing?
Strength and conditioning by far. For me, I want to get as big as possible and get conditioned as quickly as possible. With that said, I don't let myself go in the off season. I might gain five pounds. I'm usually cross training, surfing or playing basketball. Just trying to stay in shape, because I know when January hits my trainer is not going to take it easy on me.

Five Tips with Albert Hannemann
By Albert Hannemann
January 12, 2007

What skills immediately transferred over from the hardcourt to the beach?
For me it was my passing and setting. I learned to stay very patient when it came to passing. The wind moves the ball around a lot so you have to make sure that you stay low and balanced. If you can't pass well then you probably can't side out well because you are making your partner work very hard to give you a hittable set. I was a setter in college so that was a pretty natural transition for me. I just had to make sure that I always got under the ball and use my legs so that I don't throw or "double" the ball. You also never have to push the ball too far from your partner so you basically have to learn how to set a ball straight up instead of the indoor "outside" set.

What new skills did you have to improve on?
The hardest skills for me to improve on were defense, blocking and how to move in the sand. I was used to having 5 other players covering the court and now it was just me and my partner covering the same area. I learned how to defend one side of the court and have my partner block the other. It was difficult in the beginning when I first got on the tour to learn what I needed to do defensively in order to help my team win each game. I learned to stay balanced and very low. I also had to learn how to dig overhead with my hands. Blocking was also tough to understand because every single play you are in a one on one situation. I had to get used to not having another blocker next to me to help block more court space. I had to trust that my defender was going to be in the area I wasn't designated to block. (i.e. If I was blocking the line hit then my defender had to be ready to dig the cross court hit. Another skill I had to improve on was how to move in the sand. Playing on the beach makes everything seem slower but the reality is that you have to move faster to get to the ball. I started doing lots of plyometrics and short sprints to teach my muscles how to move quicker on an unbalanced surface.

What is the biggest difference?
I think the biggest difference between indoor and the beach is the how the wind can make it very tough to control the ball. Sure the sand is tough to play on at first but some players never really get used to the wind. You have to be a good "wind player" to be a great beach volleyball player. When you serve into the wind you can really take another team out of their side out rhythm. Once you learn to control the ball in the wind you are ready for the next level.

What is the biggest similarity?
For me it is playing against the same guys I played against in college. I still want to beat them just as bad!

Why did you cross over?
I wanted to play volleyball for a living and I loved playing on the beach. I knew I was going to be a professional beach player when I went to my first AVP tournament when I was 10 years old. My body was always sore from playing indoor and on the beach it seemed like I could play all day without any aches or pains.

FIVE TIPS
1. Lead by example. Go after every ball and play with intensity. When I coach this is what I look for when picking captains for my teams.
2. Communicate and be positive on the court and to your teammates.
3. Work out harder than everyone else. The last person out of the gym is going to be the most respected and have the best chance to succeed.
4. Listen to your coaches. They have the experience that you don't so they can help you get to your ultimate potential as a volleyball player.
5. Work on your mental game. Think about what you can do personally to help your team win.

AVP Announces New Stop on 2007 Tour: Dallas, TX
January 17, 2007

Dallas, Texas (January 17, 2007) -- AVP, Inc. (OTC Bulletin Board: AVPI), a lifestyle sports entertainment company focused on professional beach volleyball, today announced an agreement with Hicks Sports Marketing Group to bring the fast-growing AVP Crocs Tour to Ameriquest Field in Arlington, Texas to be titled the AVP Cuervo Gold Crown Dallas Open.
Dallas is the third new city announced for the 2007 AVP season (Charleston, SC was announced on Dec. 8, 2006 and Glendale, AZ announced on Jan. 3, 2007) and will make up one of 18 events nationwide. The tournament is scheduled to take place April 19-22, 2007 in Arlington, Texas, adjacent to Ameriquest Field.
AVP's Dallas debut features an integrated partnership with Hicks Sports Marketing Group, who will actively promote and present the event. Hicks Sports Marketing Group will be responsible for selling all local revenue for the tournament, including tickets, concessions, sponsorships and hospitality, with AVP maintaining control over all of its assets. Tickets will be available for purchase in mid February on the official AVP website (www.avp.com).
The AVP Cuervo Gold Crown Dallas Open will kick off with an open qualifier on Thursday, April 19 and continue with the main draw throughout the weekend, culminating with the men's and women's finals on Sunday, April 22. More than 150 of the world's top men's and women's beach volleyball professionals will compete in the tournament, televised on Fox Sports Net.
At a press conference today, Hicks Sports Marketing Group Senior Vice President Brad Alberts, AVP CEO and Commissioner Leonard Armato, and AVP Professional Beach Volleyball Stars Holly McPeak and Jake Gibb announced the agreement.
"Hicks Sports Marketing Group is very excited to be working with the AVP in bringing professional beach volleyball back to Dallas," said Alberts. "The AVP and Hicks Sports Marketing Group are committed to top quality sports and entertainment, and volleyball fans all over Texas are going to love seeing the quality of talent the AVP brings."
"We are thrilled to announce this new partnership enabling us to bring The AVP Pro Beach Volleyball Tour back to the great state of Texas," said Armato. "We look forward to working with Hicks Sports Marketing Group to bring the excitement and competition of the AVP Crocs Tour to our fans in Dallas and surrounding areas and continue expanding the popularity of the sport of pro beach volleyball."

About Hicks Sports Marketing Group
Formed in July 2006, Hicks Sports Marketing Group represents the Texas Rangers, Dallas Stars, Mesquite Championship Rodeo and other Hicks-owned interests in sports, media and real estate. In its new role as a full-service marketing agency, Hicks Sports Marketing Group will now represent a broad range of sports properties throughout the country.
Hicks Sports Marketing Group delivers a wealth of expertise in many facets of the sports business: the selling and buying of advertising and sponsorships, strategic branding and marketing, athlete and client representation as well as its new venture in real estate development.

AVP hopes to return to Boulder after hiatus
Crocs sponsorship is incentive to bring tourney back in future years
By Zak Brown (Contact)
Friday, January 19, 2007
The AVP Tour is hoping this gap between pro beach volleyball stops in Boulder isn't as long as the last one.
The tour will not come to Boulder this season after two largely successful years at Boulder Reservoir. Before 2005, the AVP's last tour stop in Boulder was 1996. Boulder city officials confirmed on Wednesday that the tour won't be here this season, but they also said they would like to see the tourney return in future seasons. AVP CEO Leonard Armato said the same on Thursday.
"We love Boulder. It's a great sports city," Armato said in a telephone interview. "We just wanted to let everybody know that we lament not being able to come this year."
The AVP has another big reason it would like to be in Boulder besides the large crowds of the last two years. Niwot-based Crocs, Inc., is the title sponsor of the tour. The Boulder tour stop meant Crocs could easily see the product it sponsors. Armato said that was definitely a plus and an incentive for the tour to return.
The AVP is growing, which has forced the tour to change its schedule. The Boulder event has been the on the last weekend in August in the last two years. The tour wanted to change that date this season, partially because of requests of its broadcast partners, Armato said. The tour proposed some other dates, but the tour and Boulder representatives couldn't agree on those dates.
Armato also said the tour does not have any other dates in Colorado scheduled right now for the 2007 season.
Boulder and the AVP have one advantage in getting the tour back to Boulder. Instead of just a few months, like they had this year from August to
January, the two groups have more than a year to find a suitable weekend for the tournament. The city would like to bring the tournament back as soon as next season.
"We loved it both years and hopefully we can have participation in it again," Deputy Mayor Suzy Ageton said Wednesday.
Armato would like to see more support from local sponsors for the event. But other than that he was happy with how the return to Boulder worked out. Both sides will continue to try and work for another return in 2008.
"Overall we were delighted with the growth of the event," Armato said. "We have our connection with Crocs and we would like to have an event in their backyard."

Ashley Ivy: A Woman With a Plan
By Matt Zuvela
January 23, 2007
When Ashley Ivy packed up her car and moved to Los Angeles from Austin, Texas, she was surprisingly calm for someone who never does anything without a plan.
"I am very calculated in my moves," she said. "I like to know what's coming in the future."
For most of her life, Ivy has stuck to some sort of plan based on the variety of options that came her way. She was involved in multiple sports in high school which led to many scholarship opportunities. The best offer on the table was to play indoor volleyball at Stanford.
As a freshman, Ivy was overshadowed by the woman she had been recruited to replace: Stanford's legendary right side hitter, Kerri Walsh. Walsh was a senior at the time, and after she graduated, Ivy was next in line for her spot. Despite having some big shoes to fill, Ivy rose to the challenge and helped keep the winning tradition at Stanford alive. Stanford went on to win the national title Ivy's junior year in 2001 and she was named to the NCAA Final Four All-Tournament team.
In the meantime Ivy was quietly pursuing a very demanding academic schedule that put her on track to finish her undergraduate degree two quarters early. Many students, athletes or not, would have taken the extra free time to take a few electives and coast for the rest of their senior year, but not Ivy. She had already begun to pursue her master's degree at Stanford before she was even admitted to the graduate school.
After just five years at Stanford, Ivy had her bachelor's and her master's degrees in environmental science and hoped to become a science teacher and coach volleyball. As usual, Ivy had a clear plan of what she wanted to do with her life. She even had a great job offer which would have allowed her to do just that. But for the first time, something was holding Ivy back.
"I finished my masters and I had a great job offer in northern California to start teaching and coaching," she said. "But something in the back of my head was saying 'not yet.'"
Although she didn't know it at the time, it was a volleyball itch that she couldn't scratch.
Instead of taking the job, Ivy moved back to Texas to figure out her next move. She began working with Austin Junior Volleyball, a job, she says, that was right up her alley.
"I was coaching and running tournaments, and it was a full time job," said Ivy. "I was pretty content."
Ivy met a few beach volleyball players in the Austin area who invited her to come out and train, and initially it was just for fun. Even when one of her workout partners suggested they take a trip to Florida and compete in an AVP tournament, Ivy took it pretty lightheartedly.
"We turned it into a big vacation," she said.
Which is why Ivy was somewhat surprised to find herself in the main draw after playing through the qualifiers with Ella Vakhidova.
"Once we got in, we got a good draw and actually won a match," said Ivy. "We placed seventeenth, so all of a sudden my trip was paid for."
Slowly the beach volleyball bug took hold of Ivy, and the woman who never does anything without a plan was being drawn towards a sport where a sure thing doesn't exist.
"I would find myself only happy when I was playing in a beach tournament," Ivy remembers. "I said, 'I've got to try this for real.'"
That meant packing up and heading out west again, only this time Ivy was bound for the beaches of southern California. She left behind a secure job, her family and friends, and her house, which she had made into a home.
"I had a dining room set and full furniture, everything, and I left it all and just came out here with whatever was in my car," said Ivy.
Since then, Ivy has been a full-time beach volleyball player. She supplements her player's winnings with side jobs as a coach for the Southern California Volleyball Club and a personal trainer at 24 Hour Fitness.
It would be easy to call Ivy crazy for trying to scrape together a living as a beach volleyball player. As a Stanford graduate with a master's degree, she wouldn't have to look far to find a lucrative offer that would utilize her education. This observation isn't lost on Ivy, but she says that her degree is not being wasted. In fact, it is her degree that enables her and others like her to even consider playing on the beach.
"Having our degrees is all we have," Ivy said. "For me to take a dive into the deep end to play beach volleyball, I felt like wasn't such a huge risk."
Even if the income on the beach was steady, there are more factors that go into the decision to come to the beach than just how much money can be made. Like Ivy, most of the serious beach volleyball players live in southern California, which often requires a big move and a lifestyle adjustment.
In fact, several of the top young players on tour aren't from southern California and didn't grow up right next to the beach. Logan Tom, a teammate of Ivy's from Stanford, is from Salt Lake City. Brittany Hochevar is from the tiny town of Fowler, Co. The 2005 Rookie of the Year, Nicole Branagh, is originally from Orinda, Calif., but went to school all the way in Minnesota. So how (and why) do these women keep finding their way to the beach, especially when many more practical options exist?
"The reason people play beach volleyball is they absolutely love the game," says Ivy.
"You would think I'd be burned out by now -- I've been playing (indoor) since I was fourteen years old -- but I'm not. Every single time I go out there, I'm happy."
There are other reasons the beach is so attractive to former college stars. While many of them have to start from nearly nothing when they come out to the beach, making the switch can be a welcome change after many grueling years of playing indoor. Eventually, the indoor game can become a grind on the mind and body. By the time Ivy was finished with her indoor career at Stanford, her body was falling apart and she probably couldn't have accepted an offer she received to play professionally in Puerto Rico if she wanted to.
"I beat my body up pretty badly in college," Ivy said. "My senior year I was barely able to walk. That year, once we lost in the (NCAA) finals, it was kind of a relief to take a break."
"(Coming to the beach) was kind of like a new beginning. I remembered what it was like to play volleyball without pain."
It has been over a year since Ivy made the move to southern California, and she shows no signs of changing her mind about making a living out on the beach.
"I'm 20 months into my career, and I'm at least breaking even -- I'm not wasting my money doing this," she said. "I definitely don't feel like I'm wasting my time, because I get so much satisfaction out of it every tournament I go to."
With the success Ivy has been having as an outdoor volleyball player, she is likely to stay put for a while. Will she trade in her bikini on the beach for a lab coat in the front of a science classroom, or a spot on the sidelines as an indoor coach? Someday, maybe. In the meantime, Ivy is content to put her master plan on hold and enjoy life on the beach. And it doesn't take a degree from Stanford to understand why.

MEDIA MADNESS
By Indy Staff, January 24, 2007
“Sara de la Guerra” – the pseudonym of the author of the Weblog BlogaBarbara – has enlisted the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF), a First Amendment activist group, to respond to a subpoena from Santa Barbara News-Press owner Ampersand Publishing, LLC. The company reportedly subpoenaed Google to reveal the identity of the blog’s author after an anonymous threat directed at the News-Press was posted on the site on September 11, 2006. EFF wrote a letter to Judge William Schmidt, who is presiding over the News-Press hearings with the National Labor Relations Board, defending bloggers’ right to anonymity.
Organizers of the Santa Barbara International Film Festival (SBIFF) are celebrating the 2006 Academy Award nominations, which were announced on Tuesday. Helen Mirren, Will Smith, and Forest Whitaker – all of whom will receive SBIFF awards – were nominated for their performances in The Queen, The Pursuit of Happyness, and The Last King of Scotland, respectively. Twenty-one other nominees, including Borat! star Sacha Baron Cohen and Dreamgirls star Jennifer Hudson, will also appear at the festival.
Despite Santa Barbara’s storied beach volleyball history, the AVP professional tour has decided not to include the sands of Santa Barbara in its 2007 schedule. Lamenting the lack of a major local sponsor, the tour is pulling the plug, at least for now, on its annual pre-Memorial Day extravaganza on West Beach. Besides being home to volleyball legends such as Dax Holdren and Todd Rogers, Santa Barbara beaches are second only to Manhattan Beach in hosting the most AVP tournaments ever, with 50 men’s and 30 women’s events held here since 1950.
The theme for the 33rd Annual Summer Solstice Celebration has been announced as “Stars.” Entries in the official poster and T-shirt design competition must be submitted to 924 Anacapa Street by January 26, and must measure no more than 30” by 40”, weigh a maximum of 30 pounds, and be ready to hang for display. Entrants must pay $15 per submission; children pay $10 per entry. No entrant may submit more than three. Entries need not reflect this year’s theme. Executive Director Claudia Bratton suggests that the winning design will be “graphic, colorful, and simple rather than too complex.”

Not All Beaches Are Created Equal
By Matt Zuvela
January 25, 2007
There are exactly two things that never change on beach volleyball courts across the world. The court is eight meters wide and sixteen meters long, and the net is 8'0" for men and 7'4" for women. Beyond that, there are dozens of variables that make each court in the world unique and present players with a variety of challenges and factors that can affect their game.
One of the unique features of beach volleyball is that it is played outdoors and exposed to all the elements. Tournaments are held in all conditions except lightning, and beach veterans Holly McPeak and Stein Metzger have seen it all.
"I've played in a complete downpour (in Santos, Brazil) where I couldn't even see my feet," said McPeak. "They were in a complete puddle."
Ideally beach volleyball is played on a hot day in the sun, but the mercury can rise too high and make the heat an enemy.
"Last year in Brazil the sand was so hot it cooked my toenail and the whole toenail came off," Metzger said.
The temperature can drop the other way, too.
"In Croatia it was 6 degrees Celsius (43 degrees Fahrenheit) and raining," said Metzger of an FIVB event in Zagreb in 2006.
The wind is almost always a factor on the beach and can even become part of the players' strategy depending on whether they are hitting into the wind or against it. Metzger said that his partner, Mike Lambert, benefits by having a little wind in his face.
"If we have the wind straight on, he can just hammer his serve into the wind and it's good for three or four points a game," Metzger said.
Other times the wind can be too strong and negatively affect the game.
"In Marseille, France we play in some of the windiest conditions I've ever seen," said McPeak. "It's awful. The ball blows out of your hand and you can't even serve it."
As tough as the conditions may be, players have to deal with the weather the best they can and try and stay focused on their game.
"You have to take the right approach mentally, because that's a whole different type of volleyball," McPeak said. "It's who plays it the best and who stresses out the least."
Even in ideal conditions, one of the most noticeable differences in beaches is the depth of the sand. Some courts have deep, loose sand while others are hard packed.
Hermosa Beach, California is famous for having some of the deepest sand in the world. This can be a blessing or a burden for players, depending on their experience level and what type of athlete they are.
McPeak said that deep sand favors those who train in it and players with good ball control who can move the ball around the court.
Metzger adds that it is important to stay patient on the deep sand, where it is more difficult to move around.
"As soon as you move one way and there's a good player over there and he sees you, he'll just tip it the other way," said Metzger. "You really need to hold your ground and show him only one spot."
The sand of beach courts needs to be checked out before each tournament, and AVP tournament director Matt Gage said that all sites undergo a thorough inspection before each competition begins.
"The beaches we go to are public beaches, so generally they are maintained and they are clean," Gage said. "Some sand is better than others, but generally the sand is usable for us."
Despite the preparation by the crew, whatever else is mixed in with the sand on the playing surface becomes part of the game. Players are constantly picking up debris from the court that ranges from relatively minor -- rocks, twigs, and shells -- to the potentially dangerous.
Metzger tells a story of an exhibition tournament that he played in Melbourne, Australia with Lee LeGrande where tournament officials found hypodermic needles in the sand before play began. Initially, Metzger said he wouldn't play with needles on the beach, but in the midst of protests from the promoters finally agreed to play.
"I said, 'Ok, we'll play in our shoes but we're not diving'"
While waiting for the match to begin, Metzger was standing on the court and dug his toe part way into the sand.
"I was just sitting there waiting for Lee and I kicked up another needle. I said, 'I'm not playing!'"
The promoters continued to protest, but after another rake of the sand revealed six more needles (for a total of twelve), Metzger had seen enough. Despite not playing, he and LeGrande got to keep their appearance fee and used it to make the most of their day in Australia.
"We went and had sushi and beers," Metzger said.

Manhattan Beach Open's plan for all-paid seating killed
Panel passes on 100 percent plan, but volleyball tournament could still get OK to require entrance fees for more spots.
By Andrea Sudano
STAFF WRITER
The Manhattan Beach Planning Commission has spiked a proposal to allow the owners of the Manhattan Beach Open volleyball tournament to charge every spectator an entrance fee, saying it didn't have enough information to approve the change.
"I need to have the argument fleshed out a little bit," Commissioner David Lesser said. "I wasn't clear why we needed to do this now."
To allow more paid seating at the mostly free summertime event -- the so-called Wimbledon of beach volleyball -- the city first has to amend its Local Coastal Plan, a set of guidelines for coastal development and use, which the California Coastal Commission must ultimately approve.
The City Council initiated the amendment process nearly a month ago, when the Association of Volleyball Professionals, which owns the Manhattan Beach Open, persuaded it to consider changing the plan to allow total paid admission.
The council then sent the modification to the Planning Commission, knowing full well the Coastal Commission would probably balk at 100 percent paid admission. Once the amendment process began, a more realistic paid-seating ratio could be worked out, the council agreed.
But Lesser said the Planning Commission couldn't settle on a number Wednesday, saying it seemed arbitrary to choose a ratio without more information or a dialogue with AVP.
"I'm not categorically opposed to (paid seating), but I wanted more information to make the finding," he said. "We had to do something beyond just echo and mimic what the City Council directed."
It's not match point yet, though. The association has another serve next month, when the City Council weighs in on the plan amendment.
Also next month, the Coastal Commission will decide whether AVP can charge full admission at its Hermosa Beach tournament, giving the Manhattan Beach City Council a good understanding of how much the commission is willing to bend on paid seating.
Since 1993, the commission has let the association charge about a quarter of attendees admission fees, but AVP officials now say that is not enough.
The Manhattan Beach Open has lost hundreds of thousands of dollars every year since 2001, with a loss of about $509,000 at last year's tournament alone, executives said. Levying admission fees is a way to make the public company solvent, they said.
Dave Williams, AVP's director of market development, was confident the Planning Commission's decision wouldn't derail the association's quest.
"What happened was unfortunate, but it doesn't even slow us down," he said.
But Dennis "Duke" Noor, a longtime volleyball fan and South Bay resident, believed the commission's decision was a step in the right direction and an indication the beach would stay accessible.
Both men, however, agreed on one thing: The debate over paid seating on the beach has gone on for a long time.
"They've been going around and around on it for years," Noor said. "And it needs to be resolved for the better of the coast, for our natural resources. We want to protect it for years to come."
"This is always going to be a lightning rod issue in the city," Williams said.

No Hoover beach party this year
Saturday, January 27, 2007SOLOMON CRENSHAW JR.News staff writer
Professional beach volleyball will not return to the Hoover Met this year.
Bruno Event Team President Gene Hallman said a scheduling conflict was the problem bringing the AVP Tour back to town.
The aim was to hold the event at the same time as last summer.
"This year's dates, July 12-15, will conflict with an Olympic Qualifying Grand Slam event in Berlin," Hallman said. "Obviously, all the top professionals must attend an Olympic qualifying event.
AVP officials tried to get the dates of the Berlin event changed but could not.
Bruno Event Team and Hoover hosted the AVP Hoover Open presented by Vault last July at the Hoover Metropolitan Stadium. It was the first of three events the AVP agreed to have in Hoover.
"We will still have two years remaining on our contract," Hallman said. "Basically, the contract is frozen in place and will begin again in 2008.
"Frankly, the silver lining is you often see Olympic sports like figure skating and pro beach volleyball rise to their greatest popularity the year of and the year after the Olympics," Hallman said.
A crowd estimated at 26,000 came out to see professional beach volleyball players including 2004 Olympic gold medalists Misty May-Treanor and Kerri Walsh.
The men's and women's finals were televised on Fox Sports Net.

Annett Davis and partner Jenny Johnson Jordan are the longest running duo on the beach
By Matt Zuvela
January 29, 2007
Annett Davis and her partner Jenny Johnson Jordan have the longest standing partnership on the AVP tour. They are also one of only two teams to defeat in action the 2004 gold medalists Misty May-Treanor and Kerri Walsh on the AVP tour. Davis appeared in eight final fours in 2006 and took home second place twice. Off the court, Davis is a mother of two. Her children came at the same time as her partner's two children, and as a result these two players share a special connection both on and off the court.

Do your families get together at all during the off season for any trips or things like that?
Yeah, this off-season we went to the mountains together. The older kids love to play with each other, our husbands are really good friends, and of course we are too. So we just hung out.

What's the best and the worst part about taking a six month hiatus from AVP competition?
The best is that you get to rest and do absolutely nothing! (Laughs). It's wonderful. We've played like that (with little rest) since like the seventh grade, and our two pregnancies were our only time off in our lives, so it's awesome. The worst part is getting out of shape, because you have to come back. Especially after being forty pounds heavier from being pregnant.

Is it hard to get back into training after a break or are you ready to go once it is time to train?
I'm usually excited. I don't touch a volleyball after the season is over until now (the end of January), so it's definitely refreshing to come back and play again.

Do you experiment with new kinds of training or do you stick with what works?
Well, this year I'm going to have a new trainer, so I have no idea what he's going to do. So it will be all fresh and all new.

Which is your favorite off season holiday?
Definitely Christmas. It's fun for the kids, fun for us.

Dain Blanton Looks to Rebound in 2007
By Matt Zuvela
January 30, 2007
Dain Blanton has quite the beach volleyball resume. As one of the AVP's top players, Blanton has won nine titles domestically. Internationally, Blanton has won two titles and has finished in the top-ten in more than half of his foreign appearances. Blanton has represented the United States twice in the Olympics including winning the Gold Medal at the 2000 Sydney Games.
With such a stellar resume, 2006 was clearly not Blanton's finest year on tour. Blanton recorded his best finish, third place, in the opening event of the season. The third place finish and three more top-ten finishes would be a career year for most, but Blanton expects more than that. Blanton is ready to put last year behind him and get back to his winning ways.

By now, you must have your off-season routine down to a science. What kind of stuff do you focus on in your training?
The key in the off season is to take some time off, because you want to be fresh when you're coming back. And when I say fresh, I mean mentally, actually, more than physically. You don't want to wear yourself into the ground. I like to take a little bit of time off, but I still stay in shape. I've been broadcasting a little more this off-season too. The key thing right now for me is to get with the right partner to start contending to win some tournaments again. It was a dry spell last year, and I'm kind of in between in terms of getting the right partner. If I'm with the right partner who I think I can succeed with. That will be essential if I decide to play internationally.

When it comes to swapping partners in the off season, how does that work? Who calls who? Do you have a singles party?
Yeah, we draw them out of a hat!
Actually, most people have one another's phone numbers. You find out who you think you might be able to work with and then if they are interested in playing with you. For me, I'm looking for a big blocker that has a lot of beach experience and very strong at the net, confident, and wants to win. I think there are only a handful of guys out there, so I'm looking to get one of those partners and get back to contending to win some tournaments.

What is it like having to go through the year and a half process that leads up to the Olympics?
The Olympic process is tough. It's all taking place on the FIVB. There's nothing here. You could be the number one ranked team here, and it doesn't really matter. It's all how you do in international tournaments, unfortunately.
It would be nice if it were a mix of the two. You've got to travel quite a bit, and you've really got to grind it out. It's all about getting your best eight finishes. You can play in only eight, but those eight have to make you one of the top two teams in the US. It's a tough road, but I've done it twice now and like I said, if I decide to go back and try it again, I will have to be with the right partner that I think I could win with. I've always gone out with intentions of winning. Whenever I enter an event, I think I can do well in it. When I don't have that feeling, that's when I won't play anymore. I know the level that the international guys are at and I know there are a handful of guys I can play with to be successful at that level. If I'm not playing with one of them, then I won't spin my wheels.

What do you do to relax during the off season?
I love having time to golf. That's the thing with golf -- it takes so much time. I love playing basketball as well. And just chilling... hanging out with friends, because you work so hard during the season and during the off-season it is so important to have a good time and take that time off. It's a lot easier to take time off and enjoy when you're having a success in the sport that you love to play. Like I said it's been a rough year, so there's a lot of work to be done in the off-season.

Five Tips with Rachel Wacholder
By Rachel Wacholder
February 2, 2007

What skills immediately transferred over from the HardCourt to the Beach?
The fundamentals are very similar. How you make contact with the ball for bumping, setting and serving all transferred over immediately. As did my eye-hand ability.

What new skills did you have to improve on?
Because the indoor game has six players you are able to hide weaknesses and build particular strengths. You can be a big net player where you are able to put the ball down and block your opponent, however you may lack the ability to pass or set well. For me, I had to work on improving my all around game. Unlike the indoor game, I am involved in every single point on the beach. I need to be able to block, dig and set on every play. All of my skills needed improvement.

What is the biggest difference?
The biggest difference is two-fold, the elements and the two person team. Having to play with the sand, wind and sun is obviously a huge change from indoor. And being responsible for hitting the ball at least once every time the ball crosses the net is also a huge difference.

What is the biggest similarity?
At the end of the day, it's still volleyball.

Why did you cross over?
When you finish playing College Ball and want to pursue Volleyball as a professional, you are given two choices, indoor or beach. I had been playing indoor my whole life and while I loved it, what could be better than getting paid to play on the beach. You hear about the lifestyle repeatedly and it is all true. I am at the beach nearly everyday playing and training. The sport is great and the atmosphere could not be better.

Give five tips for the Indoor Player that helped you be the most successful on hard court
1. Balance -- As in every sport, make sure that your center of gravity and balance are always in check. With good balance, you will be able to jump higher, recover faster, pass smoother and hit the ball harder.
2. Pepper -- Peppering may seem like a mindless way to warm up, but it is actually a very good tool in learning how to improvise when hitting. It forces you to work on your hand-eye coordination.
3. Repetition -- To improve at any skill you need to practice it over and over again. Only at that point will be you be able to convert consistently when the game is on the line.
4. Accuracy -- As you are practicing your angles and line shots put greater emphasis on hitting you spot than on spiking the ball.
5. Enjoy Yourself -- At the end of the day this is sports. It should be fun and a stress reducer.

A Chat with Chad Turner
Courtesy Of Delgados Online
http://www.kendelgado.com/news/OTL020407.html
By Ken and Nina Delgado
Posted February 4, 2007

The high profile AVP players often get most of the attention, though there are many other talented athletes on the AVP Crocs Tour. You may not have heard much about Chad Turner lately since he missed last season due to an unfortunate ankle injury. He's fully recovered now and looking forward to the start of the 2007 AVP season. Chad played most of the 2005 season with Canyon Ceman and took a fifth place with Canyon at the AVP Boulder Open. To show you how hard the path was to a fifth place finish, they had to win matches against Matt Heath/Ryan Mariano, Sean Rosenthal/Larry Witt, Phil Dalhausser/Nick Lucena, and Brian Lewis/Sean Rooney.

Perhaps like us you've wondered about what goes on during the off-season for AVP pros. We were fortunate to have the opportunity to chat with Chad and for him to share a bit about his year off, what he's doing to prepare for the upcoming season, and his goals for 2007.

On The Line: How did you injure your ankle?
Chad Turner: It's been an ongoing problem from multiple ankle sprains over years of playing basketball and volleyball. When you sprain your ankle really bad sometimes you'll rip off some small pieces of bone which become floating bodies and can get caught in the joint. So I had to get those bodies removed and I had two large bone spurs removed that were pinching some nerves.

OTL: How did the recovery go? Fully recovered?
CT: I had surgery in October and I'm 100%.

OTL: How did it feel having to miss the 2006 season?
CT: It really was frustrating because I worked hard in the off-season and was ready to go. Then in February I was training with Jay Ring and I rolled my ankle and that was it. The pinching was too much to handle so I went and got X-rays and a MRI and saw doctors in Florida and in California. I tried therapy and it just wasn't getting any better so had to have surgery. My wife Tyra hurt her shoulder on the same day I rolled my ankle. She was able to play through most of the season but also needed surgery in the off-season. We decided to have our surgeries here in California which worked out great.

OTL: What is your off-season training schedule? What activities do you do?
CT: This season was different because of the surgery, so I did a lot of rehab for my ankle. I also started a periodized workout schedule that is five months long and is based on four-week cycles. Every cycle changes with different weights, cardio, sprints, plyos, etc. The program is amazing and really keeps you motivated. The program takes you right up to April and tracks your progress with charts and ongoing testing. When I'm not training I love to play golf with my dad. The one thing I miss most about Florida is the water. I was raised on the water, fishing and playing at the beach. It just isn't the same in California. When I'm in Florida I'll try to go fishing everyday.

OTL: What city do you live in and what beach do you practice at?
CT: I live in Hermosa Beach with my wife Tyra during the season and we go back to Florida in the off-season. So far I've been practicing at the HB Pier and at 2nd street with Fonoi in Hermosa.

OTL: Any particular skill/ability that you focused on improving in your training?
CT: Passing and setting you never can practice too much. At this level every pass and set is crucial. Being a blocker I try to focus on transition setting a lot. I strongly believe in being great at the basics. I also want to focus on jump serving this year. I think I can mix some things up with strong serving.

OTL: Who do you plan to play with this year?
CT: Still undecided but there are some great players out there like Casey [Jennings], Fonoi [Eric Fonoimoana], Nick [Lucena], [Dain] Blanton, [Aaron] Wachtfogel, [John] Hyden, [Ryan] Mariano to name a few who at least to my knowledge haven't decided yet on who they're playing with.

OTL: How often do you practice?
CT: As of Monday of this week [January 29] I've been training with Eric Fonoimoana. We've trained with his coach, Tim, three times this week. On volleyball practice days I go to the gym after practice and work on legs, chest, or back depending on what day it is and I always work on core. On non volleyball training days I either do a sprint workout at a track or do plyos.

OTL: What side do you play? (Left, right)
CT: I can play both sides so it really helps with choosing a partner.

OTL: What do you look for in choosing a partner?
CT: I look for someone who is aggressive. I really like aggressive volleyball. That's one thing Canyon used to always tell me "good things happen when you're aggressive". Experience is big also. Playing with someone who knows the other players and their tendencies really is an advantage. I don't really have to be buddies though, as long as we're playing well I'm fine with keeping it business only.

OTL: Do you plan to play in all the events?
CT: I plan on playing all the events including the invitationals!

OTL: What do you do for work? How do you balance work and AVP events?
CT: I have my 520 All-Lines State Adjuster license from Florida. I work for an independent adjusting firm. So basically when a Hurricane hits I'm there. It works out great because Hurricane season runs from the end of summer and into late Fall which allows me to play Volleyball for the season. In 2005 I played in Chicago and then left for New Orleans to write claims from Hurricane Katrina. Let's just say I could write a book about that experience.

OTL: Do you usually watch any matches (men or women)? If so, who and why?
CT: When I can I'm always a good boy and watch my wife [Tyra Turner] play. Usually I'm always trying to watch who I'm going to be playing next to see if I can pick up any tendencies. If I'm done playing I'll try to watch someone like [Jeff] Nygaard, [Jake] Gibb, or Furbs [Matt Fuerbringer] because their body types and game is the most like mine and I always want to try to improve my game.

OTL: Any particular tournaments you look forward to?
CT: Florida is always fun because Tyra and I will have our families and friends there. The California events are nice because there's no travel involved. I also really like the stop in Ohio at the tennis stadium [AVP Cincinnati Open]. In Ohio the facilities are great because it's a fixed stadium and is very accessible for the players and fans.

OTL: What do you most enjoy about the AVP tour?
CT: How competitive it is. It seems every year there are teams that just pop up from nowhere and have great seasons. You're getting great matches in the second round now.

OTL: What motivates you to be an AVP player?
CT: To be able to compete at the highest level of a sport is truly a blessing. Although I've been plagued with injuries the last three years I'm healthy now and I'm really excited to get after it this season.

OTL: What are your goals for this season?
CT: My main goal is to stay healthy and make it to Sunday consistently. I feel that once you're playing on Sunday anything can happen. For me the ultimate goal would be to make a final and of course win. Also, I think making it to the invitationals would be amazing.
You can contact Chad Turner at Chadrock212@aol.com.

Mason to host Crocs Cup beach volleyball championship
Cincinnati Business Courier - 10:58 AM EST Tuesday
There are no sandy shores in Cincinnati, but it's a beach volleyball destination nonetheless.
Reach Event Marketing, local promoter for the professional beach volleyball tour, and AVP Inc. said Tuesday they've signed a five-year deal to bring the season-ending Crocs Cup championship to the Tri-State.
Cincinnati will host the professional beach volleyball championship through 2011, according to a news release. This year's event is scheduled for Aug. 30-Sept. 2 at the Lindner Family Tennis Center in Mason.
"After hosting the 2006 AVP Crocs Cup, it was an easy decision to secure the event for five more years," said Bob Slattery, president of Cincinnati-based Reach Event Marketing. "... We are proud to be able to bring it, with its national television coverage, to the Cincinnati region."
Tickets for the championship go on sale Feb. 14 and can be purchased online through Tickets.com or at Meijer stores in Cincinnati, Louisville, Lexington, Dayton and Columbus. Tickets prices range from $9 to $75.
AVP Inc. (OTCBB: AVPI) is a lifestyle sports entertainment company based in Los Angeles.
 
Intimidation
February 6, 2007
Qualifiers are tough work. Normally on the Thursday before the Main Draw starts, hopeful but usually fairly inexperienced teams compete for a chance to play in the main draw. For the winners, they earn an exciting but scary fate: facing one of the top teams on the tour, bright and early Friday morning.
In a sport where young players get to play the best so quickly, do the athletes ever feel intimidated by their unbelievably strong competition? Pros who have battled on Thursdays in the past few years share their thoughts.
"To a point, I was intimidated in maybe the first couple tournaments, but that changes, the more you're around and the more you meet the guys. There are players I respect a lot, and maybe I was intimidated. But now when you start to play at their level or near their level, they respect you more. It's not an intimidation thing, it's more of a mutual respect." John Mayer (Mayer and partner Brad Keenan made it out of the 2006 Hermosa Beach Open qualifier and into the main draw. The duo went on to win five main draw matches including upsetting the third seed, Jake Gibb and Sean Rosenthal, and the sixth seed, Dax Holdren and Sean Scott, on their way to a third place finsish).
"I just feel like [more experienced teams] know exactly what they're going to do, they know exactly what they need to do, and they know how to do it, and that's intimidating. They've been doing it for so long. They're so solid, and we definitely look up to them as well. It's always good to play against them." April Ross (Ross and partner Keao Burdine won three matches to get out of the 2006 Sacramento Open qualifier. Ross and Burdine won three more matches on their way to setting a career best ninth place finish).
"I don't anymore. I used to, when I was playing in the qualifier. You come in out of the qualifier and you play a team like that and you say to yourself, 'Oh boy. I read about them.' This last year making it to the final in Huntington and meeting a lot of those people on the way has really boosted confidence and taken that edge off. You get accustomed to being in a situation and it just gets easier." Ryan Mariano (Mariano played in his last qualifier at the beginning of the 2005 season. He has not looked back. Mariano recorded a second place finish in the 2006 Huntington Beach Open and seven more top-ten finishes).
"Never, anymore. I was one time, when we first played Karch (Kiraly). But we beat him, so I got over it." Nick Lucena (Lucena and former partner Phil Dalhausser defeated 2004 Team of the Year Mike Lambert and Karch Kiraly in the 2004 Hermosa Beach Open on their way to a career best 3rd place finish).
"No, not really, if you think about it like that, and you play scared, you're not going to have as much fun. Just go out there, be yourself, and compete." Sean Rooney (Sean Rooney made the main draw in his third attempt and has not looked back. Rooney ended the 2006 season with six straight top-ten finishes including two fifths).
"You're not really intimidated. You just have a certain level of respect for the older guys. I won't say intimidated, you just have a lot of respect, more than you might have for somebody else. It's hard to explain. Instead when you play a team you know you should beat, it's not like you don't respect them, but you respect guys like Todd [Rogers] and Phil [Dalhausser] more." Ben Koski (Koski played in the main draw in 11 of the 12 2006 events. Koski twice recorded a career best ninth place finish, one of which came in his hometown of Santa Barbara).
"You make dumb mistakes, because you're trying too hard, because you think that they're a better team." Jeff Minc (Minc played in the main draw in 11 of the 12 2006 events. Minc twice recorded a career best ninth place finish, one of which came in his hometown of Santa Barbara).
"I definitely think so, playing against Misty [May-Treanor] and Kerri [Walsh]. Obviously, they've been playing together forever, but I think it's fun. It's definitely fun playing against them." Keao Burdine (Burdine, who finished ninth twice with partner April Ross in 2006, faced May-Treanor and Walsh four times in 2006, losing all four).
"I'm intimidated a little bit when one of the big guys gets my number but that happens to everybody." Matt Olson (Olson marked his best career finish in 2006, fifth place, at the Chicago Open).
"I don't feel intimidated but it's hard to justify what we're doing sometimes because there's not a lot of financial return. It's hard to justify all the pressure and stress, too." Hans Stolfus (Stolfus, the 2005 Rookie of the Year, played in his last qualifier in July of 2004. Since then, Stolfus has finished in the top-ten 16 times including a third place finish in the 2006 Santa Barbara Open).
"No, I learn from (the more experienced players). I always get better and better. I like playing them." Ashley Ivy (Ivy played out of the qualifier four times in 2006 having already made the main draw in her other appearances. Ivy finished 13th twice in 2006).
"At the beginning of the year, you come in and it's like, ?We have no chance!' But now we still know that we have to play really hard to beat some teams, but it's not as intimidating." Brad Keenan (Keenan won the 2006 Rookie of the Year, highlighted by his run through the qualifier all the way to third place in Hermosa Beach).
"I don't think I ever feel intimidated but sometimes I do feel like it's out of my control, like we're out playing against Misty and Kerri and we're doing the best we can but it feels like it's out of my control." Saralyn Smith (Smith has not played in a qualifier since the 2005 Cincinnati Open, where she rallied from the qualifier to a 13th place finish. Since then Smith has finished in the top-ten three times).

San Francisco Will Be the Closing Event on the 2007 AVP Crocs Tour
February 8, 2007
San Francisco, California (February 8, 2007) -- AVP, Inc. (OTC Bulletin Board: AVPI), a lifestyle sports entertainment company focused on professional beach volleyball, has announced an agreement with Giants Enterprises to bring the fast-growing AVP Crocs Tour to San Francisco. The event will take place Sept. 14-16, 2007 on a specially constructed 3,000 capacity Bayside Court on Pier 30/32 on the San Francisco waterfront.
San Francisco is the fourth new city announced for the 2007 AVP season (Charleston, South Carolina, announced on Dec. 8, 2006; Glendale, Arizona, announced on Jan. 3, 2007; and Dallas, Texas, announced Jan. 24, 2007) and will complete the season of 18 events nationwide.
The top professional beach volleyball athletes will be competing for the title of AVP "Best of the Beach" in the final event of the 2007 AVP Crocs Tour. The double-elimination invitational is an opportunity for eight of the top men's and women's teams to compete. The AVP San Francisco Best of the Beach will kick off on Friday, Sept. 14, and continue through the weekend with the men's and women's finals on Sunday, Sept. 16. The tournament will be televised on FOX Sports Net. Local favorites expected to compete include Stanford graduates Walsh, Fuerbringer and Lambert.
"We are excited to bring the 2007 tour season's closing event to San Francisco, home turf of some of our most popular and talented players in the sport, including Kerri Walsh, Matt Fuerbringer and Mike Lambert," said Leonard Armato, CEO and Commissioner of the AVP. "We look forward to working with highly reputable Giants Enterprises to bring the excitement and competition of the AVP Crocs Tour to our fans in the Bay Area and continue expanding the popularity of the sport of pro beach volleyball."
Walsh, a 2004 Olympic gold medalist, is one of the greatest female beach volleyball players of all time after having played professionally for only five years. Walsh, a two-time AVP MVP (2003, 2004), along with partner Misty May-Treanor, had one of the longest winning streaks in professional sports after winning 89 straight matches on the AVP Tour and international competitions between 2003 and 2004.
Fuerbringer, a four-time All-American indoor player, along with Lambert, a three-time All-American, captured the only NCAA title for Stanford with the 1997 NCAA National Championship.
"Giants Enterprises is thrilled to be working with the AVP in bringing professional beach volleyball back to the Bay Area," said Pat Gallagher, President of Giants Enterprises. "With Giants Enterprises' experience in high quality sporting event production, and the AVP's top caliber athletes and rapidly growing popularity, the alliance of the two entities forms a seamless and solid partnership," Gallagher concluded.
Giants Enterprises and the AVP have formed an integrated partnership, with Giants Enterprises actively promoting and presenting the event. Giants Enterprises will be responsible for local ticket sales, concessions, sponsorships and hospitality. Ticket details are forthcoming.

AVP scores with decision on beach volleyball ticket sales
Coastal panel's ruling on charges in Hermosa Beach could affect Manhattan decision.
By Andrea Sudano
Staff Writer
The California Coastal Commission decided Wednesday that owners of the Hermosa Beach Open can charge 90 percent of attendees admission at the annual volleyball tournament this summer, a decision that could also affect admission to the Manhattan Beach Open.
The decision squeaked by the commission on a 6-5 vote.
After long complaining tournaments were not profitable on South Bay beaches and threatening to abandon the area completely, the Association of Volleyball Professionals proposed to charge all spectators admission fees at the tournament scheduled for July 20-22.
The commission staff initially balked, though, recommending instead that the panel stick with an admission ratio of 25 percent paid, 75 percent free.
After hearing public testimony, Commissioner Larry Clark, also a Rancho Palos Verdes city councilman, immediately suggested charging three-quarters of attendees admission and letting the rest in free.
Discussion ensued, but just before the vote, Commissioner William Burke made a friendly amendment, upping the ante to a 90 percent paid-admission policy.
"Beach volleyball grew up in Southern California," Clark said.
"It's part of what makes Southern California beaches what they are today. (AVP has) told us if there aren't adjustments, they'll leave. I think that's what's going to happen here."
The commission's decision for the Hermosa Beach tournament should reverberate next week in Manhattan Beach, when its City Council decides whether to allow the AVP to pursue full paid admission this summer at its tournament, the so-called Wimbledon of beach volleyball.
Manhattan Beach City Councilman Richard Montgomery was pleased with the commission's decision Wednesday, seeing it as an indication that his city might get more local control of its beaches.
In January, Montgomery and his colleagues began the process of allowing more seating by initiating an amendment to its Local Coastal Plan, a set of guidelines for coastal use that the commission must later approve.
Knowing a decision regarding Hermosa's tournament would come Wednesday, the council intended to use the panel's ruling as a barometer for what might fly in Manhattan Beach.
Should the commission approve a similar admission level for the Manhattan Beach Open, the City Council can then set its own admission ratio -- whether that means charging 90 percent of attendees or sticking with the original 25 percent, Montgomery said.
"Our issue was local control," he said. "That's the way we look at it. It was never, 'Yippee, you can increase paid seating.'
"They just wanted control of the beach itself rather than going to the Coastal Commission."
But South Bay free beach advocates were not pleased with the commission's decision.
"It's very serious for the future of our coast, and who's to say this won't happen with surfing contests?" said Dean Francois, who traveled from the South Bay to the San Diego meeting. "The commission really had no finding to come up with this number of 90 percent."
AVP has long complained Manhattan Beach and Hermosa Beach tournaments were the biggest financial duds of all the tour stops, and argued charging admission to a quarter of attendees was not enough for solvency.
The Manhattan Beach Open has lost hundreds of thousands of dollars every year since 2001, with a loss of about $509,000 at last year's tournament alone, Chief Executive Leonard Armato told the Daily Breeze last month.
With AVP executives unavailable for comment, it was unclear Wednesday how admission prices will break down at the Hermosa Beach tournament.
But the original 100 percent admission ratio proposed a mix of tickets going for $20 and $40 each, depending on where the spectator sat and on which court.
andrea.sudano@dailybreeze.com
What's Next?
The Manhattan Beach City Council next week will decide whether to amend its Local Coastal Plan to allow more paid admission at the Manhattan Beach Open tournament. If the council gives the OK, the changes must be approved by the California Coastal Commission. The City Council meets Tuesday at 6:30 p.m. at City Hall, 1400 Highland Avenue.

2007 AVP Crocs Cup Cincinnati Open presented by Herbalife tickets on sale
February 15, 2007
Click here to purchase tickets for the AVP Cincinnati Open Presented by Herbalife
CINCINNATI (OH), February 12, 2007 - Reach Event Marketing, local promoters of the AVP Crocs Cup Cincinnati Open and AVP, Inc. (OTC Bulletin Board: AVPI), a lifestyle sports entertainment company focused on professional beach volleyball, today announced ticket sales for the season-ending, world-class AVP Crocs Tour Championship at Lindner Family Tennis Center in Mason, Ohio.
Tickets for this year's event, held over Labor Day weekend Aug. 30-Sept. 2, can be purchased through avp.com, and at all Meijer store locations in Cincinnati, Louisville, Lexington, Dayton and Columbus. Prices range from $9-$75 with special discounts and various packages available this year.
To help kick off ticket sales, a special Valentine's Day media event will be held at Slatts Pub at 4858 Cooper Road in Blue Ash, Ohio, from 4 to 7 p.m. Special guests include AVP stars Rachel Wacholder and Sean Scott, who will be in attendance to help promote the event.
The 2007 season will be Wacholder's eighth on Tour. She has won several different awards throughout her career including AVP Best Defensive Player and AVP Most Improved Player. In 2005 Wacholder won the inaugural AVP Cincinnati Open with then-partner Elaine Youngs.
Scott begins his ninth season on the AVP Tour this year. Career highlights have included Rookie of the Year honors in 1999 and Most Improved Player in 2005.
2007 AVP Crocs Cup Cincinnati Open Schedule
Thursday, Aug. 30 - Day Session (Qualifier) - 6 courts in action: 8:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m.
Friday, Aug. 31 - Day Session (Session 1, Main Draw) - 6 courts in action: 8:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m.
Friday, Aug. 31 - Night Session (Session 2, Main Draw) - 1 court in action: 7:30 p.m. to 10:00 p.m.
Saturday, Sept. 1 - Day Session (Session 3, Main Draw) - 5 courts in action: 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Saturday, Sept. 1 - Night Session (Session 4, Main Draw) - 1 court in action: 7:30 p.m. to 10:00 p.m.
Sunday, Sept. 2 - Day Session (Session 5 Main Draw) - 4 courts in action: 9:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. (men's final at approximately 2:30 p.m., women's final to follow)

Defending Champions
Women -- Misty May-Treanor/Kerri Walsh
Men -- Phil Dalhausser/Todd Rodgers

2005 Champions
Women -- Elaine Youngs/Rachel Wacholder
Men -- Mike Lambert/John Hyden
Online Information
For updated 2007 event information including sponsorships, hospitality, tickets, schedules and general announcements throughout the year visit www.avp.com

AVP SCORES COASTAL COMMISSION VICTORY
February 15, 2007
Los Angeles, Calif. (Feb. 15, 2007) -- AVP, Inc. (OTC Bulletin Board: AVPI), a lifestyle sports entertainment company focused on professional beach volleyball, today announced that application No. 5-06-396 five-year Coastal Development Permit (CDP) was approved six/five during the Coastal Commission hearing in San Diego. The decision directly impacts the AVP Pro Beach Volleyball Tournament held in Hermosa Beach as well as future scheduling of Southern California events.
An addendum to the recommendation provides that the AVP has the right to charge for 90% of paid admission.
"We are delighted with the result from today's Coastal Commission hearing," said Leonard Armato, AVP commissioner. "We are very grateful to the Coastal Commission for providing in Hermosa Beach the opportunity for this event to sustain itself economically."
Players, fans and supporters of the AVP attended the public hearing, lending their support towards the Tour's efforts to help make the Southern California events financially feasible by enabling the tour to charge attendees for admittance. Players present at the San Diego Coastal Commission meeting included three-time Olympic Gold Medalist Karch Kiraly, Olympic Silver Medalist Mike Whitmarsh and AVP Veteran Dianne DeNecochea.
"Southern California is the home of beach volleyball and is known for having the best players in the world," said Kiraly "We are professional athletes that love to compete on the beaches where the sport was born and we are thrilled about the decision today that will allow us to continue coming back to the beaches to compete for years to come."
"The sport of beach volleyball represents our state as much as our beaches do," said Commissioner Dr. William A Burke when commented on the Permit. "The AVP has taken this sport, which is our icon of our beaches and has exposed it around the world and made it a television phenomenon. I don't think we should penalize them for that."
Since the 1960s, summer volleyball tournaments have characterized the beaches of Southern California, providing recreational and economic benefits to the entire region. The AVP Tour brings world class athletes to compete at magnificent venues along the coast. The events provide positive economic impact on each of the cities involved, encourage tourism and support local businesses.
The Tour is comprised of the best men's and women's pro beach volleyball players in the U.S. and the world. Featuring more than 150 of the sport's top competitors, the AVP Tour includes world-class athletes like 2004 Olympic Gold medalists Kerri Walsh and Misty May-Treanor as well as other Olympic medalists and professional stars like Holly McPeak, Karch Kiraly and Mike Lambert. The AVP's main goal is to deliver its fans the experience of an amazing athletic contest surrounded by an unforgettable beach party.

Pro Beach Volleyball Coming To Louisville
February 20, 2007
Louisville, Ky. - Feb. 20, 2007 - AVP, Inc. (OTC Bulletin Board: AVPI), a lifestyle sports entertainment company focused on professional beach volleyball, in conjunction with SFX Worldwide, a Blue Equity Company, and Reach Event Marketing announced today that the fast-growing AVP Crocs Tour is adding Louisville as a new stop for 2007.
The AVP Louisville Open will debut on Festival Plaza at Waterfront Park over Memorial Day weekend, May 24-27. It is the first time an AVP event will take place in the Bluegrass State.
A press conference is scheduled for today at 2:30 p.m. at Waterfront Park to formally kick-off the event and will feature several key business leaders and prominent members of the Louisville community including Mayor Jerry Abramson. AVP stars Sean Rosenthal Susan Stonebarger and Michelle More will also be in attendance.
"The AVP is excited about this new partnership and we look forward to the Tour's first stop in Louisville," said Leonard Armato, CEO and Tour Commissioner. "This stop marks the first time professional beach volleyball will stop in Kentucky and we are thrilled to introduce new fans to the sport of beach volleyball and the excitement of AVP events."
More than 150 of the top professional beach volleyball athletes in the world including Olympic Gold medalists Kerri Walsh and Misty May-Treanor will compete in the tournament which will be televised nationally on FOX Sports Net.
The AVP Louisville Open will kick-off on Thursday, May 24, and continue through the weekend with the men's and women's finals held on Sunday, May 27.
Tickets go on sale Friday, February 23, and can be purchased online at AVP.com.
Prices are $15 for General Admission tickets, $35 for Courtside Box Seats with special discounts for students, children and seniors, as well as discounted all-session ticket packages ($65 GA and $150 Box Seats). The Thursday qualifying round is free of charge.
AVP, Inc. joined forces with SFX Worldwide and Reach Event Marketing, two of the sports industry's most prominent event promoters, to bring world-class beach volleyball to Kentucky for the first time ever. Other key partners involved in bringing this prestigious event to the area include the Louisville Convention and Visitors Bureau (CVB), The Greater Louisville Sports Commission, the Kentucky Sports Authority and The Louisville Waterfront Development Corporation.
"After hosting the AVP Crocs Cup Cincinnati Open the past two years, we know what a great event the Louisville Open will be," said Bob Slattery, president of Reach Event Marketing. "We are very excited to help bring professional beach volleyball to the city of Louisville and to the state of Kentucky for the first time ever."
"It is with great pride that we bring the AVP Tour to Louisville", said Jonathan Blue, Chairman and Managing Director of Blue Equity, LLC, as well as Chairman of SFX Worldwide. "Our scenic Waterfront Park and exciting 4th Street Live, with restaurants and shops, make Downtown Louisville a perfect location for an AVP Tour event."
Sponsorship packages offering significant national and regional exposure along with unique client hospitality opportunities are currently available. For updated 2007 event information including sponsorships, hospitality, tickets, schedules and general announcements throughout the year visit http://www.avp.com.
About the AVP, Inc.
AVP Pro Beach Volleyball Tour, Inc. is a leading lifestyle sports entertainment company focused on the production, marketing and distribution of professional beach volleyball events worldwide. AVP operates the industry's most prominent national touring series, the AVP Pro Beach Volleyball Tour, which was organized in 1983. Featuring more than 150 of the top American men and women competitors in the sport, AVP is set to stage 18 events throughout the United States in 2007. In 2004, AVP athletes successfully represented the United States during the Olympics in Athens, Greece, winning gold and bronze medals, the first medals won by U.S. women in professional beach volleyball. For more information, please visit www.avp.com.
About SFX Worldwide, a Blue Equity Company
SFX Worldwide is an international leader in sports management, media and events. SFX Tennis clients include the No.1 ranked woman, as well as Australian, French and US Open Champion, Justine Henin, US Open Champion Andy Roddick and the No. 1 ranked doubles team of Bob and Mike Bryan. SFX Media & Events properties include the US Open Tennis Championship, the French Open Tennis Championship, the Legg Mason Tennis Classic, numerous US-based ATP tournaments, the Boston Marathon, the Superstars Competition, the AVP Beach Volleyball tour, Ice Wars and Rock 'n Racquets. http://www.sfxworldwide.com.
SFX Worldwide is a Blue Equity, LLC Company. Blue Equity, LLC is an independent, private equity firm based in Louisville, Kentucky. It actively invests both growth capital and business expertise in enterprises with solid development potential. Blue Equity forms strategic partnerships with existing management teams and leverages its expertise and relationships to stabilize, strengthen and grow lasting value. Investment efforts and managerial expertise are focused on the operation of a global and diversified portfolio of business enterprises, including opportunities in media, publishing, sports and entertainment, financial services, real estate and international trade. Blue Equity is dedicated to helping businesses grow by accelerating opportunity and driving innovation to the marketplace. http://www.blueequity.com
About Reach Event Marketing
Reach Event Marketing (REM) is a full-service event marketing company that specializes in organizing, marketing and promoting regional and national events including the AVP Crocs Cup Cincinnati Open presented by Herbalife, AVP Louisville Open, Prep Classic, Skyline Crosstown Shootout Luncheon and i-wireless High School Tour. REM offers strategic marketing expertise at the grassroots level in many areas including the selling of advertising, sponsorship and hospitality packages, ticket sales management, and promotion. In addition to event marketing the company also publishes Hacks High School Sports, HomeTown Golf and Cincinnati Gentlemen magazines.

When Crocs Attack
With a battle plan based on 'thinking bigger than you are,' the maker of the world's ugliest shoe takes the footwear business by storm.
By Diane Anderson, Business 2.0 Magazine
February 16 2007: 12:55 PM EST
(Business 2.0 Magazine) -- By now, you've probably heard the unlikely story of Crocs - not the rugged-skinned reptiles but the equally strange-looking shoes that have become a global phenomenon.
It's quite a tale: Three pals from Boulder, Colo., go sailing in the Caribbean, where a foam clog one had bought in Canada inspires them to build a business around it. Despite a lack of VC funding and the derision of foot fashionistas, the multicolored Crocs - with their Swiss-cheese perforations, cushy orthotic beds, and odor-preventing material - become a global smash.
RON SNYDER: "We had everything required to take the company to the next level," says the Crocs CEO. The next level, of course, was taking over the world.
Celebrities adopt them. Young people adore them. The company goes from $1 million in revenue in 2003 to a projected $322 million this year. Crocs Inc.'s IPO in February was the richest in footwear history, and the company has a market cap of more than $1 billion.
But there's more than luck to Crocs's astonishing success. Its founders - and especially the CEO they brought in two years ago, former Flextronics executive Ron Snyder - made some shrewd and instructive business moves that proved crucial.
Shoe In: The Rise of Zappos
Crocs's founders - Lyndon "Duke" Hanson, Scott Seamans, and George Boedecker - almost blundered into their success. (Boedecker resigned this year, three days before being arrested for threatening to slit his brother-in-law's throat; a personal settlement was reached, and the charges were dismissed.)
They leased their first warehouse in Florida "specifically so we could work when we went on sailing trips there," Hanson says. "From the get-go, we mixed business with pleasure." The shoes were first sold to sailing enthusiasts but soon gained a word-of-mouth following among doctors, gardeners, waiters, and other people who have to be on their feet all day.
In fact, it was Snyder who really lit Crocs's fuse. He was kicking back after a four-year stint running Flextronics's global division, where he helped the giant contract manufacturer grow from $3 billion in annual sales to $16 billion. Then the Crocs founders, old college friends of his, asked him to do some consulting for the fledgling company.
"I thought I'd work a few hours a day," Snyder says. "I thought it would be restful." Then he saw how fast sales were accelerating on mere word-of-mouth marketing and agreed to take on the CEO role. "Ron got us to start thinking big," Hanson says. "He said, 'You can be a worldwide force.'"
Snyder saw that Crocs were cheap enough - $30 a pair - that some customers bought multiple pairs for special occasions. "We'd get requests for red around Valentine's Day and decided to make more red," he says. "Then we decided to base our business model on this - to deliver styles and colors customers want, and deliver them right away."
Instant Company, Crocs Edition
Simple as it sounds, that turned the shoe industry's distribution model on its head.
Usually retailers have to purchase their spring line of shoes, say, six months in advance and buy in bulk. With Crocs, they can reorder as few as 24 pairs and stock them on shelves in a matter of weeks. Best of all, they aren't left with unsold shoes they have to discount - so Crocs are always sold at a consistent price.
"They've surprised everybody," says Jim Duffy of Thomas Weisel Partners. "Their replenishment system is unheard-of in the retail footwear space."
It helped that in 2004, Snyder decided to buy Finproject NA - the Canadian manufacturer that made Crocs and owned the formula for the special resin, called Croslite, that gives the soles their unusual comfort and their odor resistance. Until then Crocs had basically been ordering and distributing Fin's product. Now it had control over manufacturing and timing.
Hanson calls it "the tail buying the dog"; Snyder declares it a "eureka" moment. "We had everything required to take the company to the next level," he says. "Proprietary processes, proprietary material, intellectual property, and distribution."
How Sweden's Poc is winning over skiers
The next level, of course, was nothing less than taking over the world. Snyder says the lesson he learned at Flextronics was "Think bigger than you are." So he added manufacturing plants in China, Italy, Mexico, and Romania.
Crocs's reach became vast: One in six people in Israel, for example, owns a pair. "Deciding to create a global infrastructure significantly added to our success," Snyder says.
And how. Revenue for the first half of 2006 was up 255 percent on 2005's impressive record, largely due to the rise in international sales. At first, Crocs predicted that foreign sales would make up 10 percent of the year's total; in fact, they're currently at 30 percent. Crocs now sells shoes in more than 40 countries. All told, it expects to sell 20 million pairs this year.
With celebrities from Al Pacino to Faith Hill sporting the clogs, Crocs could hardly ask for better marketing.
Yet the company isn't sitting still. This winter it plans to open its own 1,600-square-foot retail store in New York City's SoHo neighborhood. It's producing special branded Crocs for companies like Googl (Charts)e, Tyco (Charts), and - yes - Flextronics (Charts), as well as sports teams like the L.A. Lakers. Snyder is spending $4 million a year to sponsor the AVP volleyball tournament for the next three years. Seventy colleges are getting Crocs for their students in school colors, with preorders of more than half a million pairs.
Much of this strategy is aimed at preserving Crocs's grip on its most fickle following, the youth market. Take its recent deal with Walt Disney (Charts): Shoes with Mickey Mouse-shaped holes will be available by the holidays, with other Disney-themed Crocs to follow in 2007, timed to Disney movie releases. That, Snyder hopes, will help offset the copycat factor. (Crocs has filed patent infringement cases against 11 rivals.)
Favorite Gear: Craiglist's Burning Man
Snyder is keenly aware of the threat of a sudden shift in footwear fetishes. That's where his second acquisition, of Italian footwear designer Exo, comes in. Exo's initial Crocs designs were received well by buyers and retailers at its two most recent trade shows.
"People call us a one-shoe pony," Snyder says, "but we have 23 models right now and are adding another nine next spring." Plus plenty more things to put on them, thanks to the purchase of accessory maker Jibbitz (see "Instant Company, Crocs Edition," below).
Crocs may still turn out to be a footwear fad - but that's no bad thing. Remember Deckers Outdoor's brand of Ugg boots, introduced in 1995? Even after the initial mania died down, Uggs saw steady growth. Sales of the boots were $110 million in 2005 and are expected to hit $122 million this year. Not bad for a brand that fashion forgot.
Some analysts say Crocs's biggest issue is that consumers can't always find the colors and styles they want. "As problems go," Duffy says, "that's a pretty darned good one to have." And Snyder has hired a good-looking team: Peter Case, the new CFO, brought management and retail know-how from Ashworth and Guess, while John McCarvel, a vice president from Flextronics, now heads operations. "We hired up everywhere, probably hiring people we couldn't afford," Snyder says. "But you want the right people on the bus early." After all, someday he's going to need that rest.

Crocs triples annual revenue to $355 million
Shoe company's 2006 net income was $64.4 million
Niwot-based Crocs Inc. made big bucks off its brightly colored shoes last year while it also began to diversify with more traditional styles.
The company, which went public a year ago, reported 2006 revenue of $354.7 million, more than triple its 2005 sales of $108.6 million. Crocs reported 2006 net income of $64.4 million, or $1.61 per share, compared with $16.7 million, or 51 cents per share, in 2005.
In a Tuesday conference call with analysts, Chief Executive Officer Ron Snyder attributed the bigger-than-expected sales jump in large part to growth in the company's international markets, along with robust U.S. demand.
"There isn't one market that hasn't embraced the Crocs brand and performed at or above expectations," he said.
Crocs has increased production and has the capacity to churn out 4.2 million pairs per month, he said.
For the fourth quarter, Crocs reported sales of $112.9 million, up from $33.6 million in the year-ago quarter, while net income rose to $20.1 million, or 51 cents per share, from $4.1 million, or 12 cents per share.
Crocs also announced another sports licensing deal, with several NASCAR racing teams, including Dale Earnhardt Inc. and Hendrick Motorsports. The deal follows similar agreements with the National Football League and National Hockey League to create shoes in team colors and logos.
Crocs also is the title sponsor of the Crocs AVP Volleyball tour, and it has deals with Disney, Nickelodeon and DC Comics to create shoes around a host of animated characters.
The company, which grew fast with its basic, brightly colored holey sandals, today boasts almost 30 different styles and expects to end the year with about 50, including a 10-style fall line it hasn't unveiled publicly.
"We now have some shoes that look more like traditional shoes, although maybe in keeping with our multicolored products," Snyder said in an interview after the conference call.
The company's shoes incorporate its proprietary Croslite resin, but many newer styles are fashion forward and use other materials.
This fall shoppers will find a closed clog with a larger heel, he said, as well as a Crocs slipper and a child's snow boot.
Summer has traditionally been the company's busy season, and one goal with releasing seasonal items in spring and fall is to mitigate the seasonality.
With 11,000 retailers in 80 countries, more stores outside the United States are selling Crocs than inside, where there are 10,000, Snyder said.
"There's a lot of demand and support outside the U.S.," said Angelique Dab, an analyst at San Francisco-based Nollenberger Capital Partners who rates the stock "buy."
Crocs Inc.
CROX: Nasdaq
$56
+83 cents

Hermosa Beach's AVP tournament to charge admission
The California Coastal Commission granted the association a permit to charge admission to virtually all at this year's Hermosa Beach Open.
SHAWN PRICE
Register columnist
ON THE WATER
sprice@ocregister.com
Beach volleyball narrowly cleared one hurdle last week that smacked it right up to another.
What seems on one hand a logical and necessary step for the Assn. of Volleyball Professionals, might come as a slap in the face to some fans.
The AVP was granted a rare permit by the Coastal Commission on Thursday to charge admission to virtually everyone for this year's Hermosa Beach Open. The event, like other Southern California events in Manhattan Beach and Huntington Beach, historically has been free.
"Certainly it's a landmark decision," Association CEO Leonard Armato said. "It paves the way for the AVP/Crocs tour to be viable and for its future growth."
The AVP has come a long way from its roots. Beach volleyball is now an international and Olympic sport. The league is a publicly traded company, with a healthy TV contract and is reaching for its first profitable season. Despite arriving on the world stage with the 1996 Atlanta Olympics, the AVP was a financial and organizational train wreck for years after.
"The sport of beach volleyball represents our state as much as our beaches do," said Commissioner Dr. William A. Burke of the vote. "The AVP has taken this sport, which is our icon of our beaches and has exposed it around the world... . I don't think we should penalize them for that."
All other AVP events across the country have admission charges. Except here, where the sport was born. And there is the other potential hurdle: Selling the most entrenched fans in the country on the argument that the AVP deserves to make money just like everybody else.
"The ruling applies to the Hermosa beach event," Armato said, declaring caution. "We must be sensitive to the climate at each event, but we need to access new revenue streams. There are certain people who have a sense of entitlement. But if someone is truly an AVP fan, they can support us and pony up. It's the same model that exits in every other sport."
There has been some admission at local events for the last few years. Certain premium center court seats have carried an admission, and last summer's Santa Barbara Open was the first event that had a general admission. The crowds were still big.
"The concern of a lot of the opponents is beach access," said San Clemente's Karch Kiraly, who attended the meeting and spoke in support of the permit. "When the tournament is taking place in Hermosa Beach, it's taking up about 6 percent of the sandy beach, by Sunday is down to about 3 percent. Most of that is recreational volleyball courts anyway. Nobody parks their chair on the volleyball courts."
And Kiraly remembers the lean years better than anyone still on the tour.
"There's a great tradition of watching it for free. Change is sometimes hard. Getting to watch all of the U.S.'s best players all day is a bargain," he said.
"The vote could have easily gone the other way. It probably would have meant less California events, but none of the players wanted that to happen."

Manhattan Beach will keep most matches free at event
The city rejects a proposal to allow the Assn. of Volleyball Professionals (AVP) to charge admission to all of its matches.
By Peter Yoon, Times Staff Writer
4:43 PM PST, February 21, 2007
The city of Manhattan Beach has rejected a proposal to allow the Assn. of Volleyball Professionals (AVP) to charge admission to all of its matches during its tour stop.
By a 5-0 vote, the city council agreed to allow the tour to charge for 90% of the seats in its center court stadium. All the outer courts will remain free. The tour had been allowed to charge for only 25% of the stadium seats, but the vote was still considered a setback for the AVP, which was hoping that a decision by the California Coastal Commission last week regarding its Hermosa Beach event would pave the way for it to charge admission for nearly all seats at its Southern California stops.
The AVP currently has tour stops at public beaches at Hermosa, Manhattan, Huntington and Santa Barbara. The Manhattan Beach agreement still must be approved by the state commission, a process that could take up to six months, so the change will not be in effect for the tour stop in August this year.
AVP executives say they need to generate more revenue to keep the tour coming to Southern California.

Paid seating at MB volleyball events gains momentum
Association may be able to charge 90 percent of spectators at beach tournaments pending final approval.
By Andrea Sudano
STAFF WRITER
It took years of complaints of lost revenue and threats to bail out of South Bay tournaments, but the Association of Volleyball Professionals scored its second victory in a week when Manhattan Beach opted Tuesday to loosen its regulations over paid seating at beach events.
About a week after the California Coastal Commission permitted the association to charge admission to 90 percent of spectators at its Hermosa Beach tournament, the Manhattan Beach City Council followed suit and unanimously voted to amend its Local Coastal Plan -- a set of guidelines for coastal development and use -- to allow a similar set-up at its annual tournament.
But the AVP shouldn't start printing tickets just yet.
The Coastal Commission first must approve the amendment change, and then the council will reconsider exactly how many spectators the association can charge at the Manhattan Beach Open. That probably won't happen in time for this summer's tournament.
But if the Coastal Commission is as generous with Manhattan as it was with Hermosa, the council would have the power to choose a paid admission figure anywhere up to 90 percent of attendees at future AVP events, Councilwoman Joyce Fahey said.
"What I'm interested in is the City Council taking control of the beach," she said. "I don't want the Coastal Commission to tell us how to run our beach. We're the ones who need to make that decision."
Councilman Mitch Ward, who is up for re-election next month, said he would never support the full 90 percent figure for paid seating.
The council also decided that admission fees would be charged only in the tournament's grandstand and not in outside courts, as Hermosa's deal allowed.
The AVP has long complained that both South Bay tournaments are financial stinkers, with officials reporting last year's Manhattan Beach Open losses at about $509,000.
Charging admission to 25 percent of spectators was not enough to keep the company solvent, the association argued.
While a public company, the AVP has continually been reluctant to reveal financial details, instead directing the public to view its filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission.
"We are only looking to lose less money," said Dave Williams, AVP's director of market development. "We don't even see profitability. We're trying to keep this tournament in Manhattan Beach and not hemorrhage."
But council members have required the association to prove its financial status to them in private before a decision is made about how many spectators can be charged admission fees.
Tuesday's discussion brought a drove of people, including several professional players on the AVP tour, to encourage the council to work with the association or risk the company leaving town.
"It doesn't have to be that Manhattan Beach is the epicenter of (beach volleyball)," professional player Carl Henkel said. "We need to embrace that."
A handful of people spoke against the amendment, arguing admission fees exploited the coastline and discouraged people from coming to the beach.
"Cash registers and beaches just don't go together, in my opinion," Manhattan Beach resident Bill Victor said.
Regardless of what figure the council chooses, any changes will not likely go into effect until next year's tournament, Director of Community Development Richard Thompson said.
The Coastal Commission likely won't weigh in on Manhattan Beach's proposal until September, about a month after the tournament has vacated the city's sands.

Pros ready to serve up clinic
By Brad E. Ruszala
Reporter
The build up to the Marianas Cup Beach Volleyball Festival is over as players from throughout the region make their final preparations for the biggest two-on-two action in the Marianas.
Top players from the Association of Volleyball Professionals are already on island and were welcomed back to Saipan with open arms at the home of the event-the Pacific Islands Club.
After catching lunch at the hotel, some of the top men and women entered in this weekend's competition were treated to a two-hour bike tour courtesy of Marianas Trekking where they were able to catch a glimpse of Saipan's natural beauty before making pretty plays in the tournament.
After touching down on Saipan early in the morning, Paul Baxter, Adam Roberts, Angie Akers, and Brooke Niles Hanson were ready to head out onto the roads yesterday afternoon for a tour through Marpi. It's the first time to the CNMI for all but Baxter and Akers said that she is looking forward to playing in the Cup.
“I'm pretty excited to be here. It's all new so I'm ready for a new adventure,” she said.
While Niles Hanson is one heck of a player on the court she wasn't as sure of her abilities cruising down from Suicide Cliff to the Grotto on a mountain bike. While still getting used to the humidity, the pro said that she is looking forward to playing.
“Yeah, I'm excited. I'm still wondering how it's all going to work but it should be fun,” she said.
Roberts is no stranger to playing by the ocean and the Myrtle Beach native said that the Cup should be a good warm-up for April's first AVP Tour event in South Beach.
“It's nice. It's good to be in this hot weather before we head down to Florida for our first pro event. We're excited. It should be fun,” he said.
Baxter has been to Saipan a handful of times and the Cup veteran didn't mince words when describing his experience in the Marianas.
“It's good, I love coming here every year. As long as Jon (Cramer) will have me I'll be out here,” he said.
Confident both on and off the court, Baxter made his prediction and guaranteed his tournament partner a ticket to the championship match.
“We're going to beat the Japanese as always and I'll be in the finals,” he said.
The foursome represents the top men and women from the AVP Tour but they will be joined by Hitoshi Yamamoto and Taichi Morikawa, who are returning to the Cup from Japan.
The first activities get underway this evening when the pros put on a skills clinic followed by a pair of exhibitions at the PIC. The instructional session runs from 3pm to 5pm on the San Antonio sand followed by a spirited match between the top ladies at 6pm and the top men at 7pm.
After the exhibition, the pros will be raffled off to a lucky team and competitors will head home and get a good night's sleep before the Saturday morning action at the PIC.

Pros thrill in exhibition
By Brad E. Ruszala
Reporter
 The Marianas Cup Beach Volleyball Festival kicked off with a bang Friday night as the visiting professional players hosted a two-hour skills clinic followed by a thrilling exhibition of top notch ball at the Pacific Islands Club.
Angie Akers and Brooke Niles Hanson got the night started when they defeated Japanese stars Miho Makade and Sachie Oguri 21-13 and 21-16 in the women's match, but some of the real excitement came moments after when the pros were raffled off to the tournament participants.
Kelly Butcher and Mili Saiki leapt off of the sand when they won the raffle for Akers and Niles Hanson while Nikki Shyrack and Angie Mister were equally excited to win the Japanese duo.
On the men's side, Paul Baxter teamed up with fellow AVP Tour pro Adam Roberts to play Japanese men from last year's Cup, Hitoshi Yamamoto and Taichi Morikawa. The foursome was still playing as of press time but their back and forth play captivated the crowd that surrounded the main court.
The action continues when the Cup starts this morning at 9am on the San Antonio sand with several courts open for play for the nearly 40 teams registered for the tournament as of press time.
As always the cost of admission is free and the Marianas Cup continues through tomorrow afternoon when time will tell if Baxter's guaranteed finals berth for his raffle teammate comes to pass.
 
Brazil Sweeps Challenge Series
Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, February 25, 2007 - Led by Larissa Franca, Brazil swept the 2007 Beach Volleyball Challenge Series with the United States here Sunday on Ipanema to increase the South American country’s record to 6-4 over their American rivals
Larissa, who gained a spot in the 2007 Brazil vs. United States Challenge Series by winning last week’s Queen of the Beach competition on Ipanema, and Juliana Felisberta Silva posted a 21-15 and 21-13 win over Americans Rachel Wacholder and Kerri Walsh to complete the swept.
A week earlier on Ipanema, Marcio Araujo and Fabio Magalhaes posted a 21-15 and 23-21 to give the South American country a 5-1 edge in the men’s Brazil vs. United States Challenge Series competition.  Fabio earned his spot in the Challenge Series by winning the Brazilian King of the Beach title February 11.
Larissa and Juliana’s win Sunday was the first for the Brazilian women in four matches with the Americans as the pair had dropped the 2005 Challenge Series match to Jen Kessy-Boss and Holly McPeak in two sets.  Walsh and Wacholder had posted wins in the 2004 and 2006 Brazil vs. USA Challenge Series, respectively, with different partners.
Including their two Challenge Series matches, Juliana and Larissa now have a 16-12 record against the Americans in international competition since 2004.  The two-time SWATCH-FIVB World Tour point’s champions, Juliana and Larissa posted a 7-1 record against teams from the United States in 2006.
The 2007 Brazil vs. United States Challenge Series was set up initially when Walsh and Rogers won the American Goddess and God titles last September in Las Vegas to earn their spots to represent the North American country with their chosen partner.
The next competition for Larissa and Juliana will be next month when the Brazilian domestic tour starts in Porto Alegre.  The 2007 SWATCH-FIVB World Tour begins the first of May in Shanghai, China, for the first qualifying event for the Beijing 2008 Olympic Games.
Brazil vs. USA Challenge
Men - Brazil leads 5-1
2007 - Marcio Araujo/Fabio Magalhaes, Brazil, def. Phil Dalhausser/Todd Rogers, 21-15, 23-21
2006 - Nalbert Bittencourt/Luizão Correa, Brazil def. Karch Kiraly/Mike Lambert, 21-19 and 21-19
2005 - Emanuel Rego/Ricardo Santos, Brazil def. Lambert/Stein Metzger, 2-1
2004 - Dain Blanton/Jeff Nygaard, USA, def. Emanuel/Ricardo, 2-1
2003 - Jorge Ferreira Terceiro/Luiz "Guto" Dulinski, Brazil def. Eric Fonoimoana/Dax Holdren, 2-1
2002 - Jose Loiola/Ricardo, Brazil def. Metzger/Wong, 2-0

Women – United States leads 3-1
2007 - Juliana/Larissa, Brazil def. Wacholder/Walsh, 21-15, 21-13.
2006 - Rachel Wacholder/Elaine Youngs, USA def. Shaylyn Bede/Agatha Bednarczuk, 20-22, 24-22 and 15-8
2005 - Jen Kessy-Boss/Holly McPeak, USA def. Juliana Felisberta Silva/Larissa Franca, 2-0
2004 - Misty May-Treanor/Kerri Walsh, USA def. Gerusa Costa/Vanilda "Val" Santos Leao, 2-0

Here is the 2007 Brazilian domestic schedule:
March 1-4 - Porto Alegre - RS, OPEN
March 8-11, Londrina - PR, OPEN
March 22-25 - Juiz de Fora - MG , OPEN
March 29-April 4 - Santos - SP, OPEN
April 12-15 - Campo Grande - MS, OPEN
April 19-22 - Brasília - DF, OPEN
May 17-20 - Palmas - TO, CHALLENGER
June 14-17 - São Luiz - MA, CHALLENGER
August 2-5 - Teresina - PI, CHALLENGER
August 23-26 - Aracajú - SE, CHALLENGER
September 13-16 - Salvador - BA , OPEN
October 11-14 - Vila Velha - ES, OPEN
October 18-21 - Niterói - RJ, OPEN
November 8-11 - Maceió - AL, OPEN
November 15-18 - João Pessoa - PB, OPEN
November 29-December 2 - Recife - PE, OPEN

Tickets Are Now On Sale for Opening Weekend in Miami
February 26, 2007

The AVP Miami Open will take place April 13 - 15 at Bicentenial Park in Miami. More details to follow.

Click Here To Purchase Tickets
To the AVP Miami Open
April 14 & 15, 2007

April 13th is the qualifier - Admission is free

Click here to buy tickets for Louisville and Cincinnati


 
AVP Pro Beach Volleyball Heads to Long Beach
March 1, 2007
Long Beach, Calif. - March 1, 2007 - AVP, Inc. (OTC Bulletin Board: AVPI), a lifestyle sports entertainment company focused on professional beach volleyball, announced today that the fast-growing AVP Crocs Tour is adding Long Beach as a new stop for the 2007 Tour. The event will be the debut of AVP women in Long Beach and will mark the return of the AVP men for the first time since 1985. The AVP Long Beach Open will be held on East Shoreline Drive over the weekend of July 19-22.
The event will be a homecoming for Olympic Gold Medalist Misty May-Treanor, who led Long Beach State to the National Championship and an undefeated record in 1998, earning her the NCAA Player of the Year award. The last time the AVP men competed in Long Beach was in 1985 when Mike Dodd and Tim Hovland defeated Rickki Luyties and Steve Obradovich in the championship match.
A press conference is scheduled at 3:00 p.m. PT today at Marina Green to formally kick off the event. It will feature several key business leaders and prominent members of the Long Beach community, including the Mayor of Long Beach Bob Foster and as well as the Executive Director of The Sea Festival Association of Long Beach, Christopher R. Pook. The AVP MVP May-Treanor, a native of Costa Mesa, Calif., and Leonard Armato, Tour CEO and Commissioner, will also be in attendance.
"Once again, people all over the country will see our city shine as NBC broadcasts the best men's and women's beach volleyball players battling it out in one of the most beautiful and exciting waterfront venues in the world," Mayor Foster said. "The City of Long Beach is extremely pleased to host this major sporting event."
"The AVP is excited about this new partnership and we look forward to the Tour's return to Long Beach," said Armato. "The sport of beach volleyball was born on the beaches of Southern California. We are thrilled to introduce Long Beach as an additional Tour stop. The 2007 season will bring beach volleyball to even more California cities and introduce many new fans to our exciting and fast-growing sport."
More than 150 of the top professional beach volleyball athletes in the world, including Olympic Gold medalists Kerri Walsh and May-Treanor, will compete in the tournament, which will be televised nationally on NBC.
The AVP Long Beach Open will kick off on Thursday, July 19, and continue through the weekend with the men's and women's finals held on Sunday, July 22.
Tickets can be purchased online through http://www.avp.com.
Prices are $20 for General Admission tickets, $40 for Courtside Box Seats, with special discounts for students, children and seniors, as well as discounted all-session ticket packages. The Thursday qualifying round is free of charge.
Sponsorship packages offering significant national and regional exposure along with unique client hospitality opportunities are currently available. For updated 2007 event information, including sponsorships, hospitality, tickets, schedules and general announcements throughout the year, visit http://www.avp.com.

AVP Crocs Pro Beach Volleyball Adding LB To 2007 Tour, July 19-22
(March 1, 2007) -- AVP Crocs Professional Beach Volleyball is adding Long Beach as the newest stop on its 18-city 2007 U.S. tour during the weekend of July 19-22.
The announcement was made by LB Sea Festival Executive Director Chris Pook at a March 1 press event on LB's Marina Green attended by LB Mayor Bob Foster, Olympic Gold Medalist Misty May-Treanor and (not visible in photo) Councilwoman Suja Lowenthal and AVP Tour Commissioner/CEO Leonard Armato.
The AVP Long Beach Open events will be televised nationwide on NBC and will take place in stadium/volleyball facilities to be placed just off East Shoreline Drive [map below provided with City of LB release], organizers said.
Leonard Armato: For four years we've been trying to come to this beautiful city, and Chris [Pook] I know has been working on it diligently for that long period of time, so thank you Chris for...not giving up and doing everything you could to bring us here, you finally made it happen. And I know a lot of city officials worked along the way to help Chris. [Parks & Recd Director] Phil Hester, I know you worked on this. I know City Manager Jerry Miller worked on this. I know Reggie Harrison, all the city staff. [Councilwoman] Suja Lowenthal, I know you were involved as well, and the city really made this a team effort, and of course we couldn't do it without the Mayor, Bob Foster.
This city is incredibly progressive, look around you you see what happened last weekend, the Amgen [cycling] Tour of California...and now you've finally made it to the big time, you've got the AVP Crocs Tour! [applause]
...We've gone from seven events to eighteen events in major markets all over the country in the span of just a few years and we're super-proud to be here in Long Beach...
Misty May-Treanor: ...I guarantee this will be one of the bigger tournaments of the year, if not the biggest, because it's going to pull from different cities, everybody's going to want to come here to Long Beach, and I think they're going to find out what a fantastic city it is and be jealous that they don't live here like we do.
Mayor Bob Foster: ...This is going to be a world class event, we're looking forward to it. Long Beach has been a city now with big events. We've got the Grand Prix. We've got the Marathon which draws 17,000 people. We had the Olympics in 84, the Olympic Trials in 2004. We actually are in competition now for the 2016 Olympics for about ten or eleven events here in Long Beach, and the AVP will fit right in...As part of Sea Fest, this will be a just a tremendous addition to that...AVP pro beach volleyball tour is a big plus for us. It's going continue to position Long Beach and put us in an excellent destination for sports in southern California. Our mutual friends at NBC are going to love being here. This is a really fantastic city. It is a city that's reinventing itself and it's in a real rebirth and everybody seems to really enjoy being here. It's going to put a huge spotlight on our backyard...Long Beach is looking forward to this.
Councilwoman Suja Lowenthal:...We are very excited here...We in Long Beach have been building our events dossier...Look at our beach. Our beach is beautiful...It's the best backdrop...We are a great city for this. This is about vitality and energy and health in this city. Last week's Amgen [cycling] Tour proved that and when we have the volleyball players here we will continue on that trend...
General Admission to the Friday-Sunday events will be $20...with $40 charged for Courtside Box Seats and discounts for students, children and seniors. (A Thursday qualifying round will be free of charge.)
The events will be incorporated into LB's Sea Festival, which the City Council voted in 2003 to put under the direction of a privately-run Sea Festival Association headed by Mr. Pook amid promises to bring larger summertime events to LB.
AVP Tour Commissioner/CEO Leonard Armato credited Mr. Pook and multiple members of LB city management, plus Mayor Bob Foster and 2nd district Councilwoman Suja Lowenthal for their efforts in bringing the AVP pro volleyball tour to LB.
Among those attending the press event were City Manager Jerry Miller, Deputy City Manager Reggie Harrison, Parks and Rec Chief Phil Hester, Special Events Office Director Dave Ashman, LB Gas & Oil Director Chris Garner, Police Chief Anthony Batts and Assistant City Auditor Alex Cherin.

L.B. digs pro volleyball
Tour adds to L.B.'s reputation as venue for major sporting events.
By Samantha Gonzaga, Staff writer
Article Launched: 03/01/2007 10:40:24 PM PST
Misty May-Treanor, a former Long Beach State volleyball star, and AVP Chief Executive Leonard Armato announce that the AVP Pro Beach Volleyball tour will be making a stop in Long Beach during the 2007 season during a press conference in Long Beach on Thursday. (Steven Georges / Press-Telegram)LONG BEACH - Olympic gold medalist and Cal State Long Beach alumna Misty May-Treanor greeted the news that AVP Crocs Pro Beach Volleyball will make a stop in Long Beach this summer with one word: "Finally."
For one weekend in July, the city will host the professional volleyball circuit, city officials announced Thursday.
"I'm so excited to be able to come down here, and hopefully we can showcase some volleyball," said May-Treanor, who is expected to compete in the event.
She joined representatives of the tour and city officials Thursday afternoon at a news conference announcing the volleyball event would be part of the city's Sea Festival schedule.
"It's going to put a huge spotlight on our backyard," said Mayor Bob Foster.
Scheduled for July 19-22, the AVP tournament in Long Beach will be nationally televised on NBC, with about 150 professional athletes competing for titles.
Beachside volleyball courts and a stadium accommodating up to 7,500 spectators will be constructed along East Shoreline Drive for the event, said Chris Pook, executive director of the Sea Festival Association of Long Beach.
Long Beach's inclusion in the 18-city tour is the latest development
in the city's bid to build its image as a friendly venue for large athletic events.
"It's a great brand fit," said Leonard Armato, chief executive of AVP Pro Beach Volleyball Tour. "The city of Long Beach stands for active lifestyles."
The three-year agreement with AVP - a work four years in the making - is the culmination of intense competition with other major cities gunning to be the tour's new stop, Pook said.
"This is about vitality, energy and health in this city," said 2nd District Councilwoman Suja Lowenthal.
General admission tickets are $20 and courtside box seats are $40, with discounts for students, children and seniors. Thursday qualifying rounds are free.
Tickets can be purchased online at www.avp.com.

Volleyball Vacations coming to Grand Cayman

Friday, March 2, 2007
During a recent one-day stop in Grand Cayman, Volleyball Vacations founder Albert Hannemann took time out from his adult volleyball clinics to run a kids clinic for year three and four students at Montessori by the Sea.
The youngsters received professional instruction from the 14-year Association of Volleyball Professionals (AVP) veteran and past tour event champion.
The students also got to watch one of their teachers, Wanda Brenton, play a game with Mr Hannemann against two members of the Cayman Islands Beach Volleyball Committee.
Afterwards, Mrs Brenton said it had been a great day for the kids to discover a sport they may have not been exposed to before. “Albert is great with kids. His ability to keep them all involved and interested throughout the clinic was unbelievable. The kids and parents were talking about how much they enjoyed the clinic for days,” she enthused.
Mr Hannemann is no stranger to working with kids, he is currently Vice President of the Dig for Kids Foundation which was founded in January 2000 by his cousin, Olympic Gold Medalist Eric Fonoimoana.
The purpose of the foundation is to provide academic mentoring and athletic training to kids in disadvantaged communities. Through the foundation, more than 9500 children have been taught the basic skills of volleyball and twelve Excellence in Volleyball and Academics Scholarships have been awarded to high school seniors.
Mr Hannemann is currently working with the Cayman Islands Volleyball Federation (CIVF) on plans to return to the Cayman Islands in early 2008 with his Volleyball Vacations Company.
Volleyball Vacations will bring 100 guests to the island for a weeklong visit, during which they play volleyball and learn more about the sport from top AVP players.
Mr Hannemann said he is excited at the prospect of coming back to Grand Cayman. “This was my second trip to Cayman and the Volleyball Federation here has been extremely helpful in making this our signature annual event,” he explained. Adding that he plans to arrive, with other professional players, a few days early for the 2008 event and conduct further clinics for local kids.
The CIVF say they are very proud to be able to bring a professional level programme such as Volleyball Vacations to Grand Cayman and expect the trip to generate further interest in the sport.
For more information on Volleyball Vacations visit www.volleyballvacations.com.


Kiraly likely to announce retirement
Beach volleyball legend is expected to give it up after this season.
By SHAWN PRICE
The Orange County Register
Karch Kiraly, one of the greatest beach volleyball players in the sport's history, is expected to announce his retirement at an informal news conference in Huntington Beach on March 13. But he hasn't left the sand just yet.
The three-time Olympic gold medalist and longtime San Clemente resident is expected to play in several events during the AVP season, including the Huntington Beach Open scheduled for May, before leaving the professional ranks in September. During the news conference, he also is expected to talk about his involvement in a new grassroots beach volleyball event in Southern California.
Still a marvel of fitness and competitive fire at 46, Kiraly (pronounced keer-EYE) is a towering figure in the game. He has won more tournaments (148), more money ($3 million plus) and more professional accolades than any other player on the sand over a 29-year career.
Kiraly's first pro year on the beach was 1978. The length of his career has stretched out so long that Kiraly was already a top player when his most recent partner, Larry Witt, was in diapers.
As an indoor player, Kiraly starred as well. He was a four-time All-American at UCLA, where he led the team to three national championships. Two of the seasons, 1979 and 1982, the Bruins were undefeated. In 1992, his jersey was retired, and he was inducted into the school's hall of fame.
He won his first two Olympic gold medals with the U.S. indoor team, before returning to the beach for good, where he won the gold with then-partner Kent Steffes in the sport's Olympic debut in Atlanta in 1996. Kiraly was also the AVP's most valuable player six times.

AVP CROCS TOUR ANNOUNCES 2007 SCHEDULE
March 5, 2007

LOS ANGELES - March 5, 2007 - AVP, Inc. (OTC Bulletin Board: AVPI), a lifestyle sports entertainment company focused on professional beach volleyball, today announced its 2007 AVP Crocs Tour schedule. It includes an unprecedented 18 tour stops, up from 16 in 2006, and a record $4 million in prize money. The prize money, split equally between the men and women, represents a 14% increase from last year's $3.5 million.


The 2007 AVP Crocs Tour includes nine new additions - Miami, FL; Dallas, TX; Glendale, AZ; Louisville, KY; Tampa, FL; Charleston, SC; Long Beach, CA; Boston, MA; and San Francisco, CA. Tickets to all 2007 Tour events will be available at http://www.avp.com.


AVP 2007 Schedule


April 13-15 - Miami, FL
April 19-22 - Dallas, TX
May 3-6 - Huntington Beach, CA
May 10-13 - Glendale, AZ
May 17-20 - Hermosa Beach, CA
May 24-27 - Louisville, KY
May 31-Jun. 3 - Tampa, FL
June 7-10 - Atlanta, GA
June 14-17 - Charleston, SC
July 5-8 - Seaside Heights, NJ
July 19-22 - Long Beach, CA
Aug. 2-5 - Chicago, IL
Aug. 9-12 - Manhattan Beach, CA
Aug. 16-19 - Boston, MA
Aug. 23-26 - Brooklyn, NY
Aug. 30-Sept. 2 - Cincinnati, OH
Sept. 6-8 - Las Vegas, NV
Sept. 14-16 - San Francisco, CA


All events will be televised on NBC and/or FOX Sports Net (FSN).


For the first time, fans can also view all of the finals live on http://www.avp.com. A detailed broadcast schedule will be released soon.


In addition, AVP has continued its development of several promoter relationships to help bring the action of the AVP to additional cities throughout the United States. Local organizers are responsible for promoting events at the local level, including tickets, hospitality, concessions and sponsorships. Event cities with local partners announced to date include: Dallas (Hicks Sports Marketing Group), San Francisco (Giants Enterprises), Glendale (Ellman Companies), Atlanta (Atlanta Sports Council), Las Vegas (Harrah's), Charleston (Family Circle Cup), Brooklyn (Nets Basketball/Forest City Ratner Companies), Louisville (SFX Worldwide and Reach Event Marketing), Seaside Heights (Positive Impact Partners) and Cincinnati (Reach Event Marketing). AVP's strategic alliances with top local promoters allows the tour to gain a stronger presence in event markets as well as year-round local marketing and outreach for each event.


"We are pleased to announce our 2007 tour schedule, which includes our classic tour stops and several new ones this year," said Leonard Armato, CEO and tour commissioner. "Through a number of successful promoter alliances, we are able to bring the excitement of beach volleyball to more cities throughout the country than ever before, increasing the exposure of beach volleyball and reaching a larger audience. With a growing fan base, increased sponsorship and a growing Tour schedule, we are excited to commence the 2007 tour season in Miami this April."

At the Lake: AVP Tour not returning to Tahoe
Provided by the Tahoe Daily Tribune
March 6, 2007
AVP Tour players are accustomed to playing on picture-postcard days and before packed stadiums.
That didn’t happen at MontBleu Resort Casino & Spa last September and, consequently, the tour won’t return to Stateline in 2007.
The Stateline venue wasn’t one of nine venues retained for the 18-stop 2007 AVP Crocs Tour schedule that was released on Monday.
“The weather wasn’t that good and the event didn’t do that well,” said Paul Reder, president of PR Entertainment Inc., which provides all of the entertainment and sports for MontBleu.
“It was a great experience to be associated with AVP, a good alignment for our brand, but we struggled with some of the midweek events. The market was too small to support the midweek events.”
Unfortunately, the AVP Tour rolled into town just as the area was receiving an early dose of winter. Cold rain, swirling winds and overnight temperatures near freezing kept spectators away from the makeshift beach behind MontBleu. Tickets were affordable, ranging from $20 to $75.
Reder, however, hasn’t given up hope on bringing back the AVP to Lake Tahoe in some form.
“We’re looking at other opportunities to align ourselves with them,” Reder said. “We’re thinking about doing some qualifying events. There might be some opportunity this summer. We’re seeing what makes sense for the community. If it was a two-day event, it would be great. It’s hard to draw people midweek.”
Before last year’s Sept. 14-16 tournament, players such as Kerri Walsh and husband Casey Jennings were excited about the Tahoe venue because the location was ideal for family and friends.
“There’s no greater place for me. This is where I learned to play beach volleyball,” said Jennings, a four-time winner on the AVP Tour. “You are gonna have a lot of people come out of the woodwork who are excited to watch it, and hopefully we’ll get some new fans out of Reno and Carson City who will come.”
They didn’t. Remaining California venues for 2007 tour include mainstays Manhattan Beach, Hermosa Beach and Huntington Beach along with new stops at Long Beach and San Francisco. Other new venues for 2007 include Miami; Dallas, Glendale, Ariz.; Louisville, Ky.; Tampa, Fla.; Charleston, S.C.; and Boston.
“Through a number of successful promoter alliances, we are able to bring the excitement of beach volleyball to more cities throughout the country than ever before, increasing the exposure of beach volleyball and reaching a larger audience,” said Leonard Armato, tour commissioner and chief executive officer.

Welcome to the new AVP.com!
New online home of AVP kicks off for 2007 season
By Mark Newman / Special to AVP.com
You have a new partner this season.
The kind of partner you can rely on to go horizontal for a dig with three inches of air to spare over Manhattan Beach sand. The kind you can rely on to be as equally motivated as you at 15-15 in the third game. The kind you can rely on for the kill when you've just floated your best set of the day and a fat purse is on the line.
Welcome to the bigger, better and badder AVP.com, which has just been relaunched expressly for a soaring fan base that is about to greet a bigger, better and badder AVP Crocs Tour. Opening Day of the 2007 season is set for April 13 with the AVP Cuervo Gold Crown Miami Open, so get to know your new partner in the meantime by playing with some hot technology. Order upcoming courtside tickets and a pair of those comfy gold or black AVP-logo Crocs, and get ready for more.
"We are thrilled with the new AVP.com knowing that Beach Volleyball fans across the world will experience AVP Pro Beach Volleyball like never before," said Leonard Armato, CEO and Commissioner of the AVP.
"AVP.com is the most comprehensive and most visited volleyball site on the net. The new site will offer a combination of deeper content, rich media, community functionality and a more complete statistical package that will clearly enhance the user experience and make AVP.com a daily destination for AVP fans."
The AVP Crocs Tour is coming off a year in which its fan base saw more than a 50-percent increase, and this time around it will feature two additional events (18 total), nine new cities, and a record $4 million in prize money to be split equally between the women and men. All events will be televised on NBC and FOX Sports Net, and for the first time, fans with broadband connections will be able to watch live weekend video during the season on AVP.com. Major League Baseball Advanced Media is powering the new AVP.com, and the same award-winning technology that lets out-of-market baseball fans view up to six live games with MLB.com Mosaic will allow AVP fans to watch multiple games simultaneously this season.
Your new partner will be mesmerizing that way at times, and always informative, helpful 24/7 and ready to grow the overall Beach Volleyball community to more extreme heights. The many key features of the new AVP.com include:
One-stop-shop for AVP ticketing. Tickets for select events are now available. You can print your AVP Cuervo Gold Crown Miami tickets right there at home or at the office after you've ordered them here. "All Session Passes" are available for the Louisville and Cincinnati events. The main ticketing page offers plenty of convenience including links to all of the event details you need.
Tour event pages. Your new partner is everywhere on the court. Each AVP Crocs Tour stop has its own area complete with a Gameday Central featuring preview, live scores, stats, recap and multimedia, as well as ticketing and venue info and a history of that event. Just click any event on the master schedule page. Each of those tour pages will be a hub throughout the season and no place will have more intense AVP coverage.
Expanded player profiles. This sport has grown hotter and hotter since the 2004 Summer Olympics in Athens, and it is going to keep growing in popularity. That is mainly because of the elite athletes who hold such a grip on fans with their raw appeal and fluid games. Study up on the tour stars like historically predominate partners Misty May-Treanor and Kerri Walsh, as well as the newer kids on the block. Player profiles will be teeming with video clips, pics, headlines, season/career stats and bio data.
Monster multimedia. Look for The Natural, the Hawaiian Curtain, The Turtle, Steino and all those Gods and Goddesses of the Beach on the main video page. It already is chock-full of clips and they will keep coming like a 26-24 dramafest opener. Take a look at the new photo galleries. Right now is a good time to do that, reliving the bods on the beach from 2006 and whetting the appetite for the tour just ahead.
Volleyball Nation. Here's one of the best reasons to have a partner: It helps you find even more friends. Start your own leagues; post messages; win prizes on the AVP E-Team; sign up for VN newsletters to get an edge on other fans; and be on the lookout for a gradual rollout of more community features that will let you generate your own content and grow networks of like-minded fans and participants. This will be the mecca for those who play Beach Volleyball and those who watch Beach Volleyball. That myspace page you've been living on for a while now? You're probably going to want to use that fun-readable page to promote your main AVP.com presence this summer.
When asked recently what she liked to focus on during training, AVP Crocs Tour member Rachel Wacholder said: "Focus on getting stronger and getting myself in the best position to maintain throughout the season, because it's a really long season. I think that's the key -- being able to make it through lots and lots of tournaments in a row."
We think of the new AVP.com site kind of the same way. It's a long season, and you're going to want a partner who's up for it, who's always there, who's got your back and is loaded with pleasant surprises for some major breakthroughs. So go ahead and get ready for that first stop in South Florida. Practice a little while. Get those tickets, and show those new video clips and pics to your friends.
Your new AVP partner is here.

Set up guideposts for beach events
Contentious debate over paid admission at the popular AVP tournaments at Hermosa and Manhattan Beach has gone on for more than a decade. It's time to settle this issue.
Daily Breeze editorial
The contentious debate over paid admission at the popular Association of Volleyball Professionals tournaments at Hermosa and Manhattan Beach has gone on for more than a decade, pitting the California Coastal Commission, local governments, volleyball promoters and those concerned with public access to the beaches.
It's time to settle this issue. No matter which side of the question one may be on, it's not sensible to continually bicker over how these annual beach events are organized. Local government officials, supporters and critics of these events need to have some clear guidelines on what is permissible and what is not.
And maybe recent Coastal Commission actions will finally accomplish that goal. Last month, commissioners voted 6-5 to allow the owners of the Hermosa Beach Open to charge 90 percent of those attending its annual tournament paid admission. Previously, the commission set a threshold of about 25 percent, but AVP officials have complained that such limits on paid seating hurt the tour's bottom line. And AVP has previously threatened to pull out of the South Bay tournaments altogether.
The prospect of losing such home-grown tournaments should force all sides to come to a consensus. Although beach cities might not be inclined to raise the threshold all the way up to 90 percent, we would hope the Coastal Commission's latest ruling would become part of a template for local governments to set rules for an array of beach events.
Certainly, local approvals for beach events will occasionally face appeals to the Coastal Commission, but the commission should not continue to micromanage the details of individual beach events. The commission should concentrate on broader criteria for beach events that recognize expectations of public access.
In other words, the commission should put in place the guardrails to guide promoters and local governments on what's acceptable. But leave the specific details of how these events are organized to local officials who are accountable to residents of beach cities.

AVP Announces Partnership With HEAT Group Enterprises
Organizations to Jointly Stage AVP Cuervo Gold Crown Miami Open, April
13-15, in Miami, the Kick-Off Event of the 2007 AVP Crocs Tour Season
MIAMI, March 9 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/ -- AVP, Inc. (OTC Bulletin Board:
AVPI), a lifestyle sports entertainment company focused on professional
beach volleyball, today announced a multi-year partnership with HEAT Group
Enterprises, a division of the HEAT Group responsible for promoting,
presenting and producing events inside and outside the AmericanAirlines
Arena, to bring professional beach volleyball back to the beaches of Miami
with the AVP Cuervo Gold Crown Miami Open.
The AVP Cuervo Gold Crown Miami Open, to be held April 13-15 at
Bicentennial Park, adjacent to AmericanAirlines Arena, marks the inaugural
event of the 2007 AVP Crocs Tour. The AVP last visited Miami in 1997 when
the Tour consisted of men only. Jose Loiola and Kent Steffes took home the
title that year, one of Steffes' 13 single season victories in 1997. The
2007 event will be the Miami debut for the female stars of the AVP.
As part of the new integrated partnership, HEAT Group Enterprises will
actively assist with the promotion and presentation of the 2007 event, as
well as assist in selling all local revenue for the tournament, including
tickets, concessions, sponsorships and hospitality, with AVP maintaining
control over all of its assets. In 2008, the partnership will expand to a
full local promoter's role in connection with the AVP.
Attendees at a March 9 news conference included Mike Walker, executive
vice president, of HEAT Group Enterprises, Bruce Binkow, AVP chief
marketing officer, AVP Most Valuable Player Misty May-Treanor and HEAT
Forward Jason Kapono.
"We are very excited to work alongside HEAT Group Enterprises to bring
the excitement and competition of the AVP Crocs Tour back to our many fans
in South Florida," said Binkow. "By bringing the AVP to a great sports city
like Miami -- host of Super Bowl XLI and home of the defending NBA champion
Heat -- we will work as a team toward our ultimate goal of growing the
sport of professional beach volleyball in South Florida, and across the
country."
"Beach volleyball games are ever present along the sandy beaches of
South Florida thanks to our warm and sunny climate," said Walker. "And
therefore we think there's enormous potential for an event like the AVP
Cuervo Gold Crown Miami Open to develop a large and loyal audience in our
community. We are pleased to be assisting AVP with this year's event and
looking forward to taking an expanded role in the promotion and marketing
of the 2008 Open."
The 2007 AVP Cuervo Gold Crown Miami Open begins with an open qualifier
on Friday, April 13 and continues with main draw play through the weekend.
The men's and women's finals will take place on Sunday, April 15. More than
150 of the world's top men's and women's beach volleyball professionals
will compete in the tournament, televised on Sun Sports, the regional
station of Fox Sports Net.
Tickets are available for purchase on the official AVP website,
http://www.avp.com. Streaming video of the event is also available on http://www.avp.com.
About the AVP, Inc.
AVP Pro Beach Volleyball Tour, Inc. is a leading lifestyle sports
entertainment company focused on the production, marketing and distribution
of professional beach volleyball events worldwide. AVP operates the
industry's most prominent national touring series, the AVP Pro Beach
Volleyball Tour, which was organized in 1983. Featuring more than 150 of
the top American men and women competitors in the sport, AVP is set to
stage 18 events throughout the United States in 2007. In 2004, AVP athletes
successfully represented the United States during the Olympics in Athens,
Greece, winning gold and bronze medals, the first medals won by U.S. women
in professional beach volleyball. For more information, please visit
http://www.avp.com.'
About HEAT Group Enterprises
HEAT Group Enterprises is responsible for the presenting, promoting or
producing all the non-basketball events at the AmericanAirlines Arena --
South Florida's Waterfront Showplace and proud home of the 2006 NBA
Champion Miami HEAT. The state-of-the-art facility has presented concerts
of world renowned artists such as Madonna, U2, Mariah Carey, Rolling
Stones, Luis Miguel, Bruce Springstein, Paul McCartney and Shakira, and
recurring productions of family shows including the Circus, Disney on Ice,
the Wiggles and the Harlem Globetrotters. The Arena has also played host to
several live televised mega events including the 2004 and 2005 MTV Video
Music Awards and continues to showcase popular Latin productions including
Amor a la Musica, Premio Nuestro and the Latin Grammy Awards. The
AmericanAirlines Arena also has an intimate setting, the Waterfront
Theatre, a 3,000-5600 seat venue that can also be used for private
performances, dinner theatre or general session. For more information,
please visit AAArena.com.

Raising the Hawaiian Curtain
AVP star Lambert talks about life on, off court
By Matt Zuvela / AVP.com
Mike Lambert had his most successful season ever in 2006. With his partner, Stein Metzger, Lambert won five titles and reached all but one of the AVP Tour semifinals during the season. He also earned the most money of his career during 2006, which is good because he has another mouth to feed at his table. Lambert had his second child during the offseason.

Your offseason must look a little different than it used to now with two kids.
I still find time to hit the waves and go surfing or play a little guitar. Just kind of kick back but still be a family guy. I guess, actually, I feel all grown up. I work in the yard and do little projects around the house, and spend my time with our two kids.

You must have taken to being a father pretty well, because you have had two children within two years of each other.
Yeah, four at a table make a family, you know? It is cool for our daughter to have a brother and our son to have a sister. People say, "Just wait until you have kids -- it's the best" and it is totally true. It's the simple things -- just trying to make them laugh and smile -- that is the purpose of my life.

Your wife is Italian. Are you raising the children to be bilingual?
Yeah, she speaks Italian and I speak English.

The race for the Olympics officially begins this season. How will that change things for you out on the beach?
Not much. We've got a good game plan in place and we've got a good coach. I've got a good partner, and we're all on the same page with what we want to do, so we're just going to keep refining our game. This was a great offseason for us to work on the things that we want to work on.

The three American teams that have done well on the FIVB -- Jake [Gibb] and Sean [Rosenthal], Todd [Rogers] and Phil [Dalhausser], and us -- we're all right there with the best teams in the world. That's a really exciting thing for the American teams, to know that we have a legitimate shot at getting a medal. So if we keep working hard, good things will happen.
Is it difficult to stay focused on the Olympics even though they are over a year and a half away?
Stein and I haven't won an FIVB event, so that will be our goal this year, to get on the podium as much as possible and win an event. You don't want to go into the Olympics without having won an event.

What kind of things did you focus on in the offseason to stay sharp for 2007?
I'm trying to be like Karch [Kiraly] and not get out of shape. Soon as the offseason started, I'm in the gym lifting weights and getting strong. I work on my jump serve and some ball control stuff.
 
It's good to be the Boss
Veteran AVP Pro Jennifer Boss gets fresh start
By Colleen Murray / AVP.com
"She's bossy!" AVP announcer Christopher "Geeter" McGee would sing out whenever Jennifer Boss would hit the sand in center court last summer. This season, Boss is feeling the pressure to live up to her last name. When Boss and Keao Burdine, who is spending the off-season playing in Puerto Rico, were talking about a partnership, Boss decided to take matters into her own hand.
"I just said, 'I'm gonna go to Puerto Rico,'" Boss recalled.
After the two practiced together, the partnership was solidified, starting a new phase of Boss' volleyball career.
Boss began last season playing with Nancy Mason, but became partners with Rachel Wacholder late in the year. The pair never finished below fifth place and even took second at the Best of the Beach tournament, but Wacholder decided not to continue the partnership for 2007. This left Boss searching within herself to see what the problem could be.
"You can only look at other people so much," Boss said. "I ask myself, 'Why did this happen? What do I need to change in me to be a better player?' These are the things that I can do."
A big aspect for Boss was the mental side of the game. She realized that you can only work on technique so much. As she realized that she knew what to do and how to do it, she saw the importance of practicing mentally as well.
"I've been working on my mental game a lot, doing a lot of imagery stuff, a lot of visualization, 20 to 40 minutes a day. You're picturing each skill that you're doing. You picture yourself setting good balls, for example," Boss said.
The mental preparation was necessary for the new role Boss was about to play. Boss' previous partners included Holly McPeak, Barbara Fontana, Mason and Wachholder. All of these women were older and more experienced than Boss, meaning she spent her time, basically, under their tutelage.
"They're the veterans, so you pretty much listen to what they say. This year, being the older player, I have to be the role model," Boss said.
Boss is entering her sixth year on the tour, while Burdine is entering her third. Boss is excited to step into a teaching and leadership role.
"Now I have to plan practices, it's a totally different role for me. I kinda like to be in control anyway," Boss said.
Now that Boss is developed as a player, she is taking all of what she learned from her previous partners and establishing her own playing identity.
"You change as a player, I now can be the player that I am," Boss said.
For example, Boss will be playing defense for the first time this year. With this adjustment, as well as the overall shift in getting used to a new partner, the distance has made it even more challenging for the two.
"It's hard. It's also a four-hour time difference, we talk mostly through texting and emailing," Boss said.
When Boss went out to Puerto Rico for the first time, Burdine endured a draining schedule for the practices. She would make a two-hour drive to San Juan, where she and Boss would practice in the mornings with a 20-something Puerto Rican men's team. In the evenings, Burdine would drive back two hours to practice or play with her own Puerto Rican team.
"She's being a total champ," Boss, who also used to play in Puerto Rico, said.
The partners have a connection other than their histories in the Central American country; they are both USC grads.
"It's just such a strong Trojan feel. I watched her and (Keao's former partner) April (Ross) play a bunch. I was really excited to see them out. I love the way she has an attitude on the court. It's something a lot of USC girls have and I love that about them," Boss said.
The two hope the USC connection will fuel them to do well in 2007. Boss knows what she is getting into.
"It's kinda scary at first because it's all on my shoulders," Boss said.
But if Geeter's introduction is anywhere near correct, Boss should be able to take charge and handle the pressure.
Colleen Murray is a regular AVP reporter

8 Titles Short: Buddy System
Questions about how to find the right partner
By Hans Stolfus / AVP.com
The most common e-mail from readers over the last two months has been: "How do I find the right partner?" Thank you Bill, John and Greg... your devout readership will not go unnoticed.
Anyway, what I wouldn't give for that answer.
Considering our wonderful game is played by two tremendous athletes on each side of the court, one could easily argue that, "You are only as good as your partner." Think about it. If your partner can't pass, they'll get served and you won't sideout. If your partner can't set, you'll get served and you won't sideout. If your partner can't touch above eight feet with an approach jump, it doesn't matter, you will never sideout.
Kind of an important choice to be made huh? Especially when you add in finances and livelihoods...
Oh, that just reminded me of a great conversation I had with Kevin Ces from France while competing last December in New Caledonia. The two of us happened to be polishing off a breakfast buffet before being shuttled off to compete against each other in the tournament quarterfinals.
-- On another note, I really enjoy that part of the game... the part where two competitors, only hours away from battling it out, can sit down and have a decent conversation about their individual takes on the sport. For some reason, I just don't feel like pro football players from different teams enjoy lunch together before their Sunday afternoon playoff game, call me crazy. --
Anyway, Kevin and I were discussing the differences between playing on the AVP in the U.S. and playing on the FIVB for his native country of France; and he brought up more than one great point.
1. He loves the fact that the AVP doesn't require its players to wear a sponsored jersey. I told him that I had no idea what he was talking about and asked him if he had any extra tank tops he wouldn't mind selling me...
2. He loves the number of players currently competing in the United States and subsequently how many partner options it creates.
3. He loves the idea of consistently competing on home soil. His best finish of '06 was in Marseille, France where he placed 5th.
We're going to key in on #2 for the time being; perhaps because this column is about: "How to find that one great partner," and from other countries' perspectives, we have optimum selection right here in the U.S.
-- Keep that in mind next time you go through the entry points list and vocally discharge your disgust with how there are never any players available who truly compliment your game. --
So, I've got an idea. An idea that will hopefully aid in my explanation of what goes through a beach volleyball player's mind when they are making the most important decision of the year... who to bunk up with on the road. Figuratively, of course. Our sport doesn't produce enough groupies for that sentence to have multiple meanings. My idea is to demonstrate the decision making process from two different perspectives: 1) From 2006 MVP Todd Rogers, 2) From his ex-partner, 2004/05 Most Improved Player, Sean Scott.
Why these two, you ask? Well, they each individually made two of the biggest moves over the last two years, literally. And frankly, they're just really well known. Why don't we get started and find out more...

Todd Rogers-
Todd is arguably the greatest defender to ever play the sport of beach volleyball. He's a bit of a midget in today's oversized, gargantuan game, but he makes up for it by jumping way higher than his body looks like it would ever allow.
Now, it's the end of '05 and I (Todd Rogers) have just won the last three opens with my long-term partner Sean Scott. The season has come around nicely and I have just earned a whopping $50,000 over the last four weeks. After taking into consideration that at the start of the season I was playing opens with Reid Priddy and taking 17ths (due to my conflicting UCSB coaching schedule), I would say that things have come full circle and that Sean and I are playing as well or better than anyone else on tour. So, after a long debate within my own head, I have decided to end my tenured relationship with Sean and seek out a new partnership with a semi-untested giant named Phil Dalhausser. I know, I know, I know... that sounds more than a little crazy but my goal at this stage in my career is one thing and one thing only, Olympic Gold; which, if read correctly, may make my decision sound even crazier. In my defense, I only offer you this; the international game is nothing more than a mine field full of colossal monsters; 6'7" - 6'10" ex-basketball players are now a dime a dozen on the FIVB. Granted, Sean is possibly the greatest 6'5" blocker of all time but sometimes those inches really start to add up during late stages of a tournament. So, Phil Dalhausser it is. What is he, 6'10"? That will work perfectly. He sets well, he's got great ball control, he might have one of the best jump serves on the sand if he is allowed the freedom to go back and crack it, and he reaches three and a half feet over the net each and every time he blocks... yeah, I would say that he's a gamble worth taking. I'm a little nervous going into Florida but I think things will work themselves out. And Sean is playing with my good old friend, Dax Holdren, so I plan on seeing those two when it matters most, late Sunday afternoon.

Sean Scott -
Like I said in my Todd Rogers monologue, Sean is, without a doubt in anyone's mind, the best 6'5" designated blocker to ever play the game of beach volleyball. With that being said, his decision to play defense this season behind Matt Fuerbringer's massive block is what makes his story so compelling.
Now, it's the end of '06 and I (Sean Scott) have just finished a successful, yet somewhat tumultuous season with Dax Holdren. I blocked full time, while enduring a couple of injuries to my ankle and fingers, but still managed to pull out three finals appearances. The question is, of course, what now? How do I battle with the three teams currently dominating the AVP rankings and potentially take over one of two spots on the Airbus to Beijing? Well, Phil is busy being 7'2" with no hair, Lambo is a long-armed and broad shouldered 6'6", and Jake Gibb is no less than 6'7" on a short day... there's only one answer, I've got to get a big guy and start digging balls. Who's available? Casey and Matt just ended their run so Fuerby is my first call and if all goes well, he's definitely my guy. I'll switch to the right side, dig as many balls as I can run down and transition everything in sight... this will be a breeze. And before you know it, no one will even remember that I spent the last eight years of my career stuffing angle hits like it was my job. (I guess it was kind of my job, really) Is it somewhat of a gamble? I guess you could say that, but the upside is what I am counting on... literally. I will never be on a team that is outsized during international competition ever again. And hopefully, that is the difference I have been looking for. On to 2007 ...
Todd's fate has already been determined; we know how his decision turned out. Sean Scott's, on the other hand, is still up in the air. Could they be a great team? Of course. Any time you pair two great players on the same side of the court you have the potential to create a great team, but nothing is ever for certain. The moral of the story is, of course, go big or go home. I mean, I've already stated this fact twice but I'll say it again, SEAN SCOTT IS THE BEST 6'5" BLOCKER EVER! And he is going out to get himself a blocker? ARE YOU KIDDING ME!? Is finding the biggest partner you can the only way to play the game anymore? Is that really the answer? For crying out loud, how many big guys are there? I'm 6'5" and I'm considered small? Perhaps that has more to do with my 135 lb weight, straight out of a hot tub, fully clothed; but who's counting? In order to better serve the volleyball playing population, I think I have a great plan; why don't we all take a deep breath (or just me), list the guys who fit the bill and talk about how high their stock has soared during this time of immediate crisis...

Phil Dalhausser - Currently redefining every aspect of the game. He gets over the net better than anybody else on tour and absolutely seals off his side of the court.

Mike Lambert - Carried Karch to wins at the age of 58. Lambo recognizes different hitter's traits on tour better than anybody and possesses the intellect at the net to transfer that information into blocks.

Jake Gibb - My own personal worst nightmare at the net. Jake is the master of misdirection with his block. My advice, close eyes and pray.

Matt Fuerbringer - Huge moves with impeccable timing. Fuerby has the quickness of a small guy combined with the size of a big man.

Jeff Nygaard - Spread blocks, seals the net, throws shots... he's got it all. And he's got the experience to be doing it successfully for a long time to come. How long is he in Turkey?

Kevin Wong - Great hand placement, throws shots and spread blocks as well as anyone on tour - even Nygaard. He takes away my line spike as well... which is more than disappointing.

Mark Williams - First true season as a full time blocker so we're all going to see. Dynamic moves into the low angle and back into the line; Mark is very effective with showing the hitter one look and then taking it away.

Fred Souza - Best jump serve on the beach when he gets it going and is able to run to the net every point. Literally a point scoring machine.

George Roumain - Huge force at the net when he can stay healthy. I've seen photos of him grabbing the hitter's ears over the net on the block. Okay, maybe I haven't... or maybe I have.

Larry Witt - Rumor has it that he doesn't want to block full time anymore but that could only be related to the Sean Scott syndrome. He blocked full time with Karch last season and was more than impressive. The key ingredient to this equation might be that there are just not enough big guys for him to try "D."

Brent Doble - I still remember that finals match in Huntington Beach with Karch, where Doble looked like the best blocker that had ever played the game. He's not 6'10" but his net skills are still more than formidable.

Brad Keenan - Huge, freakishly long arms and an uncanny ability to throw shots while also blocking the big hit. This kid has a scary future at the net.

Jeff Carlucci - Great hands, doesn't get tooled and is heavily experienced. Only a matter of time before he establishes himself with the elite.

Matt Prosser - Not too many indoor middles have been able to make an impact on tour over the years due to ball control issues but Matt has seen an enormous amount of success because of his net presence.

Ben Koski - Sick vertical, massive reach and uncanny knack for blocking balls when it matters. Also spends a lot of time at the gym working on his lats.

Austin Restor - Jumps well, sets well and blocks big. With a great partner pick up this season, Austin's potential is limitless.

AJ Mihalic - I've witnessed AJ dominate above the tape and I've also seen him channel the hard driven ball directly onto the forearms of his defender. And he's president of the "Kinda Good" team.

Ed Ratlidge - I don't know what he does or how he does it... but he somehow gets it done. And he is the mayor of Tempe. Thank God we're not going there anymore.

Chad Turner - Sat out '06, but the word is that he's back and training with ex-Olympic Gold Medalists. He's real big and has the ability to change things around at the net in a hurry.

Scott Lane - Long arms with huge hands usually equals vast presence above the tape; Scotty is no exception.

Mike Morrison - Throws the high line better than even the guys at the top. If you don't believe me, just take a look at that photo of him essentially spiking Karch's spike from Santa Barbara '06.

Scott Hill - This guy works full time and practices nights at the Santa Monica Pier so his training time frame might not fit a lot of guys out there looking, but trust me, he blocks balls; he just does.

Billy Strickland - Real tall and great ball control usually don't go hand in hand but this kid has got it. Working on completing the rest of his game but if he does, things could get interesting for him in '07/'08.

So what now, you ask? How does this list fit into my "How to find a great partner" bit? Well, I guess I'm basically succumbing to the notion that the game has grown well outside the confines of any reasonably sized box. The only hope for success seems to be: pick up one of the guys listed above and pray that you both go to the same church... or setting academy, whatever. If you don't know any of these guys, or live on the East Coast, then I would suggest getting hold of Jason Ring's plyometric guy so you can work on your hops and possibly take over at the net yourself.

My own personal response to the limited number of gigantours? Split block and absolutely spader jump serves at all costs. You've just got to go with the theory that the big guys will crumble when a certain level of pressure is applied. I have yet to see it, but I'm sure it's only a matter of time. And of course, sideout like a God. Who needs more than two real points a game anyway if your team is siding out at .900? And when battling those big guys that seem to take up the line and angle all at once, just swing for the stands and hope it catches a finger on its way... but always plead for the touch even before you land.

Gregory finds new challenges
Coaching provides champion with challenges
By Monique Moyal / AVP.com
After completely dominating an entire era of beach volleyball, what else is left to conquer?
For Kathy Gregory, that answer is simple: step completely out of your comfort zone, guide the future stars of the AVP indoors at the college level and shatter records along the way.
With a personal role model like former-Lakers superstar Wilt Chamberlain, it's easy to see why Gregory so quickly embraced such a feat, as Chamberlain transitioned from basketball to beach volleyball with ease. He also coached his own beach volleyball team, Wilt's Little Dippers.
"When they thought [Chamberlain] wasn't able to play, he went down to the beach and was running and also coaching our team. He was very inspirational and he always came to my college games, and so I could talk to him about anything even though he was in a different sport where he was the best," Gregory said. "Most people don't have that kind of confidence, to take a chance in something else -- so I respected him for doing that. People need to take more chances in life. We all fail sometimes, but you've got to try."
In her professional beach volleyball career, Gregory won 50 titles from 1968 to 1990, which places her sixth on the all-time list. She also has amassed 38 second-place finishes, and as a result, Gregory was inducted into the Volleyball Hall of Fame in the height of her reign as "Queen of the Beach" in 1989.
In those 23 seasons, she toured with 24 partners and won with 11 of them. Ranking on the top of her list of personal accomplishments came in 1968, when she won the Pismo Beach World Championships. In 1996, Gregory became the oldest player in the United States to win a AAA beach rating, the best a player can receive on the beach. Later that year, she won the Santa Barbara Bud Light Tournament (where Gregory leads all women with seven victories) and was named to the United States Volleyball Association's All-American list, in the same year she celebrated her 50th birthday.
The following year, Gregory received the honor of being the 12th female inducted into the USVBA's Hall of Fame. In 2003, she was named to the USVBA's All-Era team from 1949 to 1979.
"I think that what separated me from some other players is that I love the game of volleyball, so I loved to play. It was not uncommon for me to go down to the beach and play for six or seven hours," Gregory said. "When someone says I have burnout, I have to say it was something I never experienced in my career as a player or even as a coach. So I think what made me strong was my will to win, [along with my] competitiveness and passion."
And for Gregory, her personal intensity and drive reflected on her own NCAA squad, as she has spent the last 32 years as the only coach at the helm of the UC Santa Barbara women's volleyball team.
Since the program's inception, Gregory has guided the Gauchos to a record of 765-316 and was named the Big West Coach of the Year six different times during that tenure. Her other coaching awards included four AVCA West Regional Coach of the Year and 1993 AVCA National Coach of the Year honors.
Since the women's volleyball NCAA Tournament began, Santa Barbara has only been one of three select teams to make all 25 tourneys. Only Stanford and Penn State can claim the same.
"I want my girls to be accountable; I want them to have the work ethic and I want them to be mentally tough and push themselves," Gregory said. "Sometimes that's hard, but people say I'm a tough coach. But I don't think you get the best unless you demand the best of yourself and you never back down to anyone. Nothing can break you; I shouldn't be able to break you, the game shouldn't."
Since leaving the AVP tour in 1990, Gregory has helped mold a few notable AVP stars such as Brooke Niles Hanson and Brooke Rundle. Currently, Gregory says that she is working to train three of her players within the rules of the NCAA to make the transition from indoor to beach volleyball.
Gregory said that she still checks in with Hanson on a regular basis and is available to give players on the tour advice as well as encouragement or suggestions about training. When asked if she could pair with any woman currently on the tour, she named Misty May-Treanor, since Gregory won the Laguna Open and played with her mother Barbara May in the 1970s.
"I see lots of [Barbara's] personality in Misty," Gregory said. "Misty I like, because she has the combination of one of the most serious players, but also one who's fun."
At the end of the day, Gregory says she is thankful for all she has encountered as a coach and a player on the AVP tour, even though gone are the days when she could jump in her car and take the weekend off of coaching to drive south for a tournament.
"I feel very fortunate when I look at the awards that I've received, and I appreciate them, but I also I think I appreciate that it's given me the life that I have," Gregory said. "I don't know how many years I'll continue to coach and teach, but I just look at it each day and I'm happy that I'm still able to do something and more importantly, still enjoy it."

Against all odds
Off-court issues not enough to stop career
By Keith Dobkowski / AVP.com
Angela Lewis is entering her fifth year on the beach and her third season as a main draw player. After two ninths in 2005 and two more ninths 2006, she is looking to continue her climb up the leaderboard in 2007. As the season is just around the corner, Lewis is spending four days a week in the sand and hitting the gym to work on strength and cardio. However, Lewis' story is not as routine as her current workouts.
Lewis grew up in Auburn, Calif., and upon graduating high school, accepted a scholarship to Sacramento State University to play indoor volleyball. Just two months into her freshman year Lewis began to suffer from intense headaches. After several tests with both a nutritionist and a chiropractor did not find anything, Lewis began to experience severe nauseau.
"I started throwing up for about two weeks before finding out I had a brain aneurysm," said Lewis.
After an MRI located the aneurysm, Lewis was taken from Sacramento to San Francisco for further evaluation.
"They had a team of specialists that take care of strokes and aneurysms. The location of aneurysm was [such] that they couldn't get into my brain. If they cut into my brain, they would have to dig in and I would have been brain-dead. At the time, the surgery was not approved by the FDA so it was still was an experimental-type thing. They went up through my femoral artery and fed platinum coils through my arteries up into my brain and clotted it into my aneurysm. They put a silicone balloon in front of the aneurysm so the blood could not have flowed there any more. They basically stroked me. At the time there was about 50 or so people with this procedure and a similar location and severity. There were five people that had this surgery. Two died and two were paralyzed. And I was the fifth person."
After defying odds and surviving the surgery, Lewis, having only missed her freshman year of volleyball, returned to Sacramento State to continue playing and to graduate.
"I just slowly came back and actually finished college in 4 1/2 years and never redshirted or anything. I was so fired up that I was alive and I could get back and get going."
Lewis finished her playing days in the fall of her senior year. She had overcome a traumatic brain ailment and survived a miraculous surgery to return to her team and more than that, return to normalcy. However, what appeared to be the long and tough road back from a near fatal aneurysm, was really just the beginning.
"At the end of my senior year, I had a cyst rupture on my ovary. I went to the emergency room. I didn't know what was going on, but was in a lot of pain. The emergency room doctor misdiagnosed me and sent me home. About 12 hours later my mom drove me back to the hospital and they admitted me. Twenty minutes later, they had me up in surgery and split me open. They found out that the cyst had ruptured on my ovary and I was bleeding internally. I lost over half of my blood capacity and it was in my stomach. Over 300 cc's were just chillin' in my stomach. Basically about another 20 minutes and I would have died."
After having the blood drained and returning home to recover, Lewis was back in the hospital six months later.
"Six months later, because of all the blood in my stomach, scar tissue had developed and an adhesion wrapped around my intestine. I was having extreme pain and I went back to the hospital. For 24 hours we did not know what was going on. Finally we fired the first doctor and hired another. The new doctor said he would help. I said, 'Do whatever you have to do.' I looked pregnant, but it was my stomach exploding inside. They cut off almost three feet of my intestine and reattached it."
Lewis is reminded of the ordeal on a daily basis from the 10 inch long scar spreading from the bottom her sternum to below her belly button as the result of 25 staples that looked like a railroad track running vertically across her stomach.
"I didn't think I was going to play volleyball anymore. It has now been about seven years, and for the first three years since the intestine surgery, I couldn't hold any energy. I could eat and my energy would just crash. I couldn't sustain."
The daily diet Lewis needs to maintain for energy becomes tougher with the schedule of a Pro Beach Volleyball Player. Lewis has become a vegetarian, and traveling across the United States over the summer months often makes it tough to keep to this strict diet.
"It has been difficult, especially in the middle of places that only have fast food," said Lewis. "I still have problems eating certain stuff. My energy collapses pretty fast if I don't watch what I eat. Last year I really found out that oatmeal is really good in the morning. I bring oatmeal with me. I bring little baggies for every morning and eat it in the hotel or I bring it and figure out how to eat it on-site. They have stuff at the site, but eating 800 million peanut butter and jelly sandwiches gets old. I have started talking to a nutritionist about taking certain supplements. Hopefully this year eating these supplements will help.
"If I watch what I eat and if I eat little meals every couple hours, it really helps. I don't get really full and put a lot of stress on my stomach. I always have to have some kind of granola bar or something just handy just in case. However, I found after long matches I just crash."
At just 28 years old, Lewis has faced death three times and lived to tell about it. Many would have taken the safer route and bypassed playing professional volleyball. But Lewis loves the sport and understands the risks involved.
"I love volleyball and I hate not being around it. It makes me happy."

Volleyball Legend Karch Kiraly Set to Compete In 11 Events on the 2007 AVP Crocs Tour
HUNTINGTON BEACH, Calif. (March 13, 2007) --- Volleyball legend and three-time Olympic Gold Medalist Karch Kiraly plans to compete in 11 events as part of his final year on the AVP Crocs Tour, it was announced today.
The winningest player in the history of professional beach volleyball, Kiraly plans to play in AVP events in Miami, Fla. (April 13-15); Dallas, Tex. (April 19-22); Huntington Beach, Calif. (May 3-6); Hermosa Beach, Calif. (May 17-20) and Louisville, Ky. (May 24-27).
In June Kiraly will play in Atlanta, Ga. (June 7-10) and Charleston, S.C. (June 14-17) before heading to Seaside Heights, N. J. for the AVP event on July 5-8.
Kiraly will close out his 2007 AVP season and his career on the professional beach volleyball circuit with three August tournaments, including events in Manhattan Beach, Calif. (August 9-12); Brooklyn, N.Y. (August 23-26) and Cincinnati, Ohio (August 30 – September 2).
Kiraly has not announced his playing partner for the 2007 season.
While Kiraly is slated to compete in 11 AVP events he is expected to be at all 18 AVP events and hopes to provide color commentary for the AVP television broadcasts throughout the season.
“As I begin my 28th season in professional beach volleyball I have reached that point where it is time for me to move on to a new phase in my career in this great sport,” Kiraly said.  “This is definitely not a retirement from volleyball in any way, but rather a shift in my focus to give something back to the sport and do what I can to grow the game of volleyball in the U.S. and around the globe."
Kiraly’s beach volleyball credentials are unmatched.  He has posted 148 tournament wins with 13 different partners and has won more than $3 million in prize money.  He has won at least one tournament in 24 of his 27 seasons in the sport.  Kiraly is the first volleyball player in Olympic history – and the only male -- to win three Gold medals, having played on the United States' Gold Medal indoor teams in 1984 and 1988, and winning the Gold Medal in beach volleyball at the 1996 Atlanta Olympic Games with Kent Steffes. When he was inducted into the Volleyball Hall of Fame in 2001, he was named the greatest men's volleyball player in the sport's first century.
“I have been fortunate to share the court with some of the greatest players in the history of beach volleyball,” Kiraly added.  “I plan to approach the 2007 season just as I have approached the past 27 with a commitment to win and a dedication to the great sport of volleyball.”
In 2007 Kiraly also will join with some of the greatest players in the history of volleyball to launch the Karch Kiraly Volleyball Academy.  Two camps will be held this summer with one at the American Sports Centers, the current training home of the U. S. Men’s National Team, in Anaheim, Calif. and a second camp held at the Virginia Beach Convention Center in Virginia Beach, Va.  Each five-day camp will be limited to 64 high school girls.

Volleyball legend Kiraly announces retirement
By SHAWN PRICE
The Orange County Register
Karch Kiraly put an end to speculation about an end date to his pro playing days, but not to his towering presence in the game he loves so much.
Kiraly, 46, of San Clemente, officially announced Tuesday during an informal lunchtime news conference in Huntington Beach he will retire from professional competition at the end of the AVP season in September.
Kiraly, routinely considered the greatest player the game has seen, is a three-time Olympic gold medalist who has won more contests (148), more money (over $3 million) and accolades than any other volleyball player. "I’ve been involved with beach volleyball for many, many, many, many … probably too many years," Kiraly chuckled.
"I will be playing one final year and not every single event." Despite not having a current partner his plan is to compete in 11 of 18 AVP tournaments this season, including all three Southern California events, with the presumed final event being the Cincinnati Open, Aug. 30-Sept. 2.
The Huntington Beach Open is scheduled for May 3-6. "I certainly have tons of memories and I’m really excited about competing here in Huntington Beach one more time, Hermosa Beach one more time and Manhattan Beach one more time,"
Kiraly said. He insisted, that despite leaving the competitive ranks, he would hardly be disappearing. "You don’t need to fit me for the Depends or a rocking chair yet, I’m going to be a busy guy," Kiraly said.
"I don’t think of this as a retirement in any sense. The last couple of weeks I’ve been busier than I’ve been in the last 15 or 20 years with all of these projects going on. I think of this more as a new phase."
The volleyball legend said he will use his name and his knowledge of the game to launch a massive amateur event in September called the U.S. Open of Beach Volleyball. Meanwhile, he will continue to be an analyst for AVP TV broadcasts and an assistant coach for his son’s varsity high school volleyball team.
He will also help promote U.S.A. Volleyball’s junior beach series, which feeds into September’s event in Huntington Beach.
"There was just a tiny smattering of junior tournaments when I was competing in 18 and under tournaments. To have a national championship or to qualify for the world championships in different age groups is a really exciting thing."
His first pro tournament was the Santa Barbara Open in 1976. He was 15 years old. On the hard court, Kiraly was a four-time All-American at UCLA where he led the team to three national championships.
He won his first two gold medals on the U.S. indoor team and won his third with former partner Kent Steffes in beach volleyball’s Olympic debut at Atlanta in 1996. Kiraly’s most recent victory was with former partner Mike Lambert in the 2005 Huntington Beach Open.

Beach party's almost over for volleyball star Kiraly
BERNIE WILSON
Associated Press
SAN DIEGO - Karch Kiraly's seemingly endless summers on the sand are just about over.
Kiraly, the man in the pink hat who happens to be the world's most decorated volleyball player, announced Tuesday that this season will be his last on the AVP Crocs Tour.
"I've gotten enough," the 46-year-old Kiraly said by phone from Huntington Beach, where he also announced plans for a grass-roots beach volleyball tournament in September. "I got to play so much more than I ever thought I would. It's been an incredible opportunity. I'm lucky to have done it this long."
Kiraly's farewell tour comes 28 years after his first beach tournament victory, with Sinjin Smith at Santa Cruz in 1979. The same year, they helped UCLA win the NCAA indoor volleyball title.
Life really has been a beach for Kiraly. He's won a record 148 tournaments, with 13 different partners, and earned more than $3.1 million.
He and Kent Steffes won the first Olympic beach volleyball gold medal at Atlanta in 1996. That went nicely with the Olympic gold medals Kiraly won with the U.S. indoor teams in 1984 and 1988.
Kiraly plans to play in 11 of the 18 AVP Crocs tournaments, starting in Miami in mid-April.
His final three tournaments will span the country in August, starting with his last competitive appearance in California at the Manhattan Beach Open Aug. 9-12. He'll also play in the Brooklyn Open at Coney Island Aug. 23-26, followed by his finale, in Cincinnati, of all places, Aug. 30-Sept. 2.
It might seem a little odd for a Southern California beach dude to end his career in the Midwest, but Kiraly said he needs to play as many tournaments as possible in order to attract a good partner. He said he hasn't decided on a partner yet.
While Kiraly won't be playing on the pro tour after this summer, he's certainly not walking away from the game. He said he's got so many projects going on that he doesn't have time for nostalgia.
"I'm about as busy as I've ever been," he said. "I'm really not thinking of it as retirement. So there's no need to get out the rocking chair or the Depends for me. I've got a lot of stuff going on. It's a fun new phase in a lifelong love with this sport of volleyball."
He's helping coach his two sons' high school team, he will launch the Karch Kiraly Volleyball Academy this summer and he's working with USA Volleyball to expand a junior beach tour. He's also launching the U.S. Open of Beach Volleyball on Sept. 21-23 at Huntington Beach, doing TV work and helping the top women's beach duo of Misty May-Treanor and Kerri Walsh.
"I'm enjoying the game through a different set of eyes," he said.
Kiraly is also scheduled to play in AVP tournaments in Dallas; Huntington Beach and Hermosa Beach, Calif.; Louisville, Ky.; Atlanta; Charleston, S.C.; and Seaside Heights, N.J.
"He still draws a huge crowd every time he plays," said Leonard Armato, the AVP's CEO and tour commissioner. "Everybody wants to see him play because he's been so good for so long. He'll be missed tremendously. I certainly hope everyone who loves the sport comes out to see him in his final season and pay respect for what he's meant.
"He can still compete with the very best players. It will be fun watching him one last time," Armato said.
Kiraly hit his peak in the early-to-mid 1990s. He had shoulder surgery after the 1996 season and struggled the following year.
"I thought that was going to be my last year," he said. "Here it is 10 years later and I still get to play. I've played so many years beyond what I thought I would get to play that I've just looked at all these years as icing on the cake."
His last win on tour was in 2005.
The most famous man in volleyball is never hard to find. Just look for the guy wearing a pink Speedo hat.
"It started as a superstition and it turned into a tradition and is now my curse," he said with a laugh. "I'm still waiting for pink to come back."
A pink hat was his lucky charm during a record-tying, 13-tournament winning streak in 1992, and it stuck.
"It was easy for my family to find me at tournaments," he said. "I was the only one with guts enough to wear hot pink."
ON THE NET
AVP Tour, http://www.avp.com
Karch Kiraly Volleyball Academy, http://www.karchacademy.com

Barbra Fontana Q&A
A tour veteran talks changes, family
Compiled by AVP.com
Barbra Fontana has been playing on the beach full-time since 1991. She has won twenty titles in her career, including the 2001 Manhattan Beach Open. After taking the 2005 season off to have her second child, Fontana returned to the beach in 2006. She finished in the top 10 in all fifteen of her starts, including two fifth-place finishes.
Fontana is one of the few players on tour who has been around long enough to witness the significant growth and change in women's beach volleyball over the years. She recently shared some of her thoughts about being back on the beach and how the game is different than it once was.

Was it nice to get back on the sand in 2006?
Definitely. I really enjoyed being back on the court. It's challenging to have a baby and then come back get all the way back in shape and get the strength you need to compete out there. I'm glad I did it and I'm happy with my decision.

How has the game changed since you started playing?
For me, it's the rule changes, and I think the biggest one is the scoring system. When they went from sideout to rally scoring, it changed a lot of the dynamics of the game. And then also the size of the court being changed has changed things for me.

What was the effect of merging the men's and women's tour?
I think that was a great decision. It was something that a lot of us believed in years before it was able to happen, and it makes all the difference in the world. The AVP has done a great job of bringing a first-class event. You get to come and watch men and women. It's a nice mix.

What do you hope to see 10 years down the road for the sport?
Ten years down the road, I would like to see everybody in the main draw making a great living.

What is your focus in the offseason?
My big focus is my family. When I'm not playing I'm one hundred percent mom and wife.

Kiraly still defying the sands of time
The ageless beach volleyball legend will patrol AVP Tour events one last season before shifting his focus to the sport's development.
By Phil Collin
Staff writer
He didn't walk into the room all stooped over, he didn't call anyone "Sonny,'' and he didn't respond to any questions with "eh?''
At 46, the athletic age equivalent of a Supreme Court justice, Karch Kiraly finally said it.
One more year.
The beach volleyball legend will hit the sand for his final 11 AVP Tour events this spring and summer, including the Southern California stops of Huntington Beach, Hermosa Beach and Manhattan Beach.
His final tournament, unless he qualifies for the season-ending "Best of the Beach'' event in San Francisco, will be in Cincinnati Aug. 30-Sept. 2.
And the fierce competitor has not lost his will to scramble for every point.
"You don't need to fit me for Depends or a rocking chair yet,'' Kiraly said Tuesday at a restaurant in Huntington Beach, overlooking the sand on which he trains.
The player who has won more tournaments than anyone (148), brought home three Olympic gold medals (two indoors) and earned more than $3 million in prize money will now shift his focus to the development of the sport around the country, launching the Karch Kiraly Volleyball Academy and working with USA Volleyball to hold the U.S. Open of Beach Volleyball that is expected to draw as many as 1,000 players in as many as 15 different divisions.
The U.S. Open will be the outdoor counterpart to the indoor nationals, and in addition to the backing of USA Volleyball, has picked up main sponsors Corona Extra and Spalding.
And Kiraly is coaching at the high school which sons Kristian and Kory attend.
"I'm so enjoying the look on a kid's face when he does something right for the first time,'' Kiraly said.
And he's so cringing when another kid mentions the time Kiraly ripped down a net in frustration at the close of a tournament in Rhode Island.
He flashes back to the lessons he learned on the beach in Santa Barbara, where he started playing at 6 years old. By 15, he was entering tournaments. By 16, reality was throwing sand in his face.
He recalled seeing Sinjin Smith, who would later join Kiraly to win 21 tournaments, for the first time in a tournament at Marine Avenue in Manhattan Beach.
Kiraly was partnered with Marco Ortega, and Smith with Mike Normand.
"His nickname was 'Stormin' Normand' ... and he was an absolute wacko on the court,'' Kiraly said. "I didn't know a whole lot about him, and unfortunately, I learned the hard way that one thing you don't say to him or call him is 'choke.' ''
After a smattering of errors from Normand, Kiraly did just that.
"And that was the beginning of the end for me,'' Kiraly said. "So he calls a timeout and says, 'What?' He's screaming across the whole beach. Mike said, 'What? Did you hear what the (expletive) punk kid called me? Choke?'
"So he goes on this tirade for about two minutes and by then I'm ready to be fitted for some Depends. He said, 'All right, I'll tell you what. If you beat us' ... and 'if we beat you, I'm going to beat the crap outta you.'
"Luckily, I didn't even know he was a Green Beret and probably killed guys with his bare hands in Vietnam or I definitely would have needed the Depends. So I called a timeout and walked down the beach and started crying and praying. I don't think we got another point.
"That's the one time I was completely discombobulated or flustered on the beach volleyball court.''
The next year, Kiraly and Ortega defeated Normand in a tournament en route to earning the sport's highest rating at the time, AAA.
And a career was born. In 1979, he joined with Smith to capture his first tournament title, the Santa Cruz Open. He has won 10 times at the sport's most prestigious event, the Manhattan Beach Open.
Kiraly became a four-year All-America pick at UCLA, helping the Bruins win three NCAA championships. He went to the U.S. national team, leading the Marv Dunphy-coached American squads to Olympic gold medals in 1984 and 1988. FIVB, the sport's international governing body, invented a "World's Best Player'' award in order to bestow it on Kiraly.
In 1996, in the first Olympic beach tournament, Kiraly and Kent Steffes won gold in Atlanta.
Kiraly then had a series of shoulder injuries but kept playing, and in 2004, he and Mike Lambert were the AVP's top team.
Kiraly said he will attend all 18 AVP events this summer, taking part in the television broadcasts when he is not playing. The tour opens April 13 in Miami, and he hasn't yet picked a partner for the season.
Whoever earns the spot beside him figures to have a memorable season.

 Kiraly to end legendary career
Titan of sport eyes bigger goals after 2007 season
By Mike Scarr / AVP.com
HUNTINGTON BEACH, Calif. -- It's not goodbye or even farewell, but the 2007 season will be Karch Kiraly's last.
Kiraly made it official Tuesday afternoon during a media luncheon at Duke's in the shadow of the famed Huntington Beach Pier that his career will turn from player to ambassador for the sport that he helped to make famous.
"You don't need to fit me for the Depends or the rocking chair, yet. I'm going to be a busy guy and I don't think this being my last year on the AVP Pro Beach Tour as a retirement in any sense," Kiraly said. "In fact just in the last couple of weeks I've probably been busier than I have in 15 or 20 years with all of these projects that are going on. I think this as more of a new phase."
That new phase includes the launching of the Karch Kiraly Volleyball Academy, which will feature a pair of five-day camps for high school girls, as well as the inaugural U.S. Open of Beach Volleyball, a grass-roots tournament sanctioned by USA Volleyball to be held here Sept. 21-23.
But up front this season for Kiraly will be a string of at least 11 events as he takes one last spin on the pro tour.
"This just seems to be the time," Kiraly said. "The time is right."
Kiraly will play in the season opener April 13-15 in Miami, and will play in the regular season finale in Cincinnati, Aug. 30-Sept. 2. He'll also make his final three Southern California appearances as a touring professional: two will be in May, Huntington Beach, May 3-6, and Hermosa Beach, May 17-20, and another will be later in the summer in Manhattan Beach, Aug. 9-12.
The remaining scheduled events on Kiraly's 2007 season include Dallas, Louisville, Ky., Atlanta, Charleston, S.C., Seaside Heights, N.J. and Brooklyn, N.Y.
The final two tournaments on the AVP calendar, Las Vegas and San Francisco in September, are postseason events and participation will be based on performance, but Kiraly said that if he qualified, he would extend his season and play.
Unknown as of Tuesday was who will be his partner for the season, but Kiraly said he is in negotiations. Kiraly had been practicing with Mark Williams, who has since left to pair up with Casey Jennings.
He made it clear, though, that his presence will be felt throughout the season. Kiraly said he will attend all 18 events on the AVP schedule this year, providing color commentary on some of the television broadcasts.
"I'm sure I'll get nostalgic near the end as these tournaments wind down and it is near my last or it is my last," Kiraly said of a career that began in 1976 in his hometown of Santa Barbara, Calif. "Right now I'm too busy to be looking back."
Kiraly's resume in the sport is impeccable and his reputation is legendary.
He's notched 148 tournament victories while playing with 13 different partners and earning in excess of $3 million as he enters his 28th year as a pro. Kiraly has at least one tournament win in 24 of his previous 27 seasons, and became the first volleyball player to win three gold medals in the Olympic Games and remains the only male to do so.
As a member of the U.S. National team, Kiraly won indoor gold in both the 1984 and 1988 Olympics and again in 1996 in the inaugural beach volleyball competition in Atlanta when he teamed with Kent Steffes. Kiraly was inducted in the Volleyball Hall of Fame in 2001, earning the additional honor as the greatest men's volleyball player in the sport's first century.
Through the upcoming summer Kiraly said he will conduct clinics and help to organize junior events in conjunction with USA Volleyball while also assisting the top women's team of Misty May and Kerri Walsh.
For Kiraly, retirement is merely a word as he takes another step in a remarkable career.

AVP Announces Management Changes
Posted on : Thu, 15 Mar 2007 11:32:01 GMT | Author : AVP, Inc.
News Category : PressRelease  
LOS ANGELES, March 15 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/ -- AVP, Inc. (BULLETIN BOARD: AVPI) , a lifestyle sports entertainment company focused on professional beach volleyball, today announced the appointment of William J. Chardavoyne as its Interim Chief Financial Officer, succeeding Andrew Reif, who will be stepping down to pursue a new outside opportunity, but will continue to work with the company temporarily to assist in the transition. William J. Chardavoyne joined the Company's Board of Directors in May 2006, and will remain a director.
Mr. Chardavoyne brings AVP more than 30 years of finance and management experience, most recently serving as CFO from 2000 through 2006 for Activision, a global publisher for interactive entertainment software products. He has also served as CFO for Movietown.com, a development stage Internet Company, and has held several senior financial management positions for Sony Pictures Entertainment and MTV Networks. He began his career as a CPA at Ernst & Young. Mr. Chardavoyne received a BBA in accounting from Hofstra University.
"We are very excited to have someone of Bill's caliber to fulfill the role of CFO until the company retains a full time one," said Leonard Armato, President and Chief Executive Officer. "We have begun a search and hope to announce something in the near future."
"This is a unique and exciting opportunity for me. I have enjoyed my role on the Board of Directors and I am pleased to be able to come on in a consulting capacity and fulfill the company's current need for a chief financial officer," said William Chardavoyne. William Chardavoyne will become a consultant of AVP to fulfill the role of Interim Chief Financial Officer, effective March 31, 2007. Andrew Reif will resign his position as Chief Operating Officer and Chief Financial Officer, effective March 31, 2007 to pursue an opportunity outside the company.
"We are obviously disappointed to lose Andy who has been with the company since current management acquired the tour in 2001. He was instrumental in the rebuilding of the AVP Tour, and leaves us in a strong position as we look to continue on our growth path. I will be taking over Andy's operational role for the foreseeable future. We all wish him the best of luck in his future endeavors," concluded Leonard Armato, President and Chief Executive Officer.
Andrew Reif commented, "I have thoroughly enjoyed working with Leonard and the AVP team over the past 6 years. We have put in place a strong platform for the future growth of the AVP Tour, and I am proud to say I am leaving the company in a much stronger position than when I started. I am committed to working closely with management to ensure a smooth transition."
About AVP, Inc.
All above-mentioned trademarks are the property of their respective owners.
Some of the information in this press release may contain projections or other forward-looking statements regarding future events or the future financial performance of the Company. We wish to caution you that these statements involve risks and uncertainties and actual results might differ materially from those in the forward-looking statements, if we receive less sponsorship and advertising revenue than anticipated, or if attendance is adversely affected by unfavorable weather. Event-related expenses, such as for the stadium, transportation and accommodations, or security might be greater than expected; or marketing or administrative costs might be increased by our hiring, not currently planned, of a particularly qualified prospect. Additional factors have been detailed in the Company's filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission, including our recent filings on Forms 10-K and 10-Q.
AVP, Inc.
 

2007 Jose Cuervo Gold Crown Offers $100,000 Bonus, Largest Purse in History of AVP Tour
'Cuervo Gold Crown Series' Includes First Three 2007 AVP Crocs Tour Events
in Miami, Dallas and Huntington Beach, Calif.

LOS ANGELES, March 15 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/ -- AVP, Inc. (OTC Bulletin
Board: AVPI), a lifestyle sports entertainment company focused on
professional beach volleyball, today announced that Jose Cuervo Tequila
will present the 2007 Cuervo Gold Crown Series.
Jose Cuervo re-launched the Cuervo Gold Crown on the 2006 AVP Crocs
Tour, a series of three prestigious tournaments. Last year was the first
year of a three-year sponsorship agreement following a ten-year hiatus as
an AVP sponsor. The series' prize this season, which will encompass the
first three events of 2007, will award a $100,000 bonus beyond the prize
money won at the individual tournaments.
"Jose Cuervo has a long, deep history as a supporter of the AVP," said
Bertha Gonzalez, Commercial Director, North America, Jose Cuervo
International. "With the Cuervo Gold Crown events coinciding with the first
three AVP Tour events this year, the energy Jose Cuervo brings to the
lifestyle of pro beach volleyball makes for a perfect season kick-off."
Jose Cuervo, the "Official Spirit of the AVP Tour," will kick-off the
Cuervo Gold Crown at the first event of the 2007 AVP season, the AVP Cuervo
Gold Crown Miami Open in Miami, Fla., April 13 - 15. The second Cuervo Gold
Crown event will take place in Dallas, Tex., April 19 - 22, and the third
and final Cuervo Gold Crown event will take place Cinco de Mayo weekend in
Huntington Beach, Calif., May 3 - 6. The three Cuervo Gold Crowns will air
on FOX Sports Net. Check local listings for times.
Also returning this year will be the Cuervo Cabana, which will be
present at all 18 AVP Tour events. Fans 21 and older can take a break from
the sun and enjoy a refreshing water in the Cuervo Cabanas, while watching
the matches which will be streamed live into the tent. Other entertainment
will include a live DJ and the beautiful Cuervo girls who will pose for
photo opportunities with the volleyball fans.
Vive Cuervo, Vive Responsibly

The Rachel and Tyra Show?
Wacholder hopes new partner, focus bring top spots
By Robert Falkoff / AVP.com
Suddenly, it's the Rachel & Tyra Show. Rachel Wacholder couldn't be more excited about the possibilities.
After filtering through two partners on the AVP Tour last year, Wacholder will team with Tyra Turner in 2007 in what both hope will be a long and profitable tenure. If all goes according to plan, Wacholder and Turner could end being a combination that's as agreeable as bacon and eggs.
"I think it's going to take a little time, but we get better every day and I think we have a lot of potential," Wacholder said. "We communicate well and we get along well."
Wacholder, who has firmly established herself as one of the top players on the Tour, started the 2006 season with Elaine Youngs as her partner. Following a mid-season split, Wacholder paired with Jen Boss and made the final four in four of their five tournaments together.
"It's not ideal to basically jump into a tournament without having played together," Wacholder said. "But it ended up working as well as I could have hoped for. Jen and I, in AVP, did real well. We had a good time and I enjoyed it."
With Turner as her partner, Wacholder sees a huge upside over the long term. The pair will debut in Miami for the opening AVP Crocs Tour event April 13-15. Ironically, Turner will be heading back to her home state. She was formerly a standout player at the University of Central Florida.
But Wacholder cautions against expecting too much, too soon.
"I'm not expecting us to be perfect from the beginning," Wacholder said. "When you start competing, you get to know things a partner likes and doesn't like. Once we're into the actual competitions, we're going to learn a lot.
"Our goal is to build as the season progresses and get better with each event. It's just a matter of Tyra and I getting experience as a team."
Wacholder, who has won five AVP events over the past two seasons, dreams of competing in the 2008 Olympics at Beijing. Those dreams don't seem far-fetched.
"I just want to feel that I gave 100 percent, whether I make it or not," Wacholder said. "I would hate to think I gave a half-effort. I want to feel I had this opportunity and I gave it everything. Then I'll be happy with whatever happens because I'll know I couldn't have anything more."
If the chemistry kicks in for Wacholder/Turner, fans on the AVP Tour will wonder if the tandem can eventually challenge the Kerri Walsh/Misty May-Treanor dynasty. Wacholder knows what it's like to topple that unit. She accomplished the feat while paired with Youngs.
"I think it would be great for the sport to have some variety," Wacholder said. "I hope we're the team to do that. I never beat them without Elaine, and Elaine never beat them without me. So, we'll see how we each do with other people."
Wacholder, who turns 32 in June, resides in Redondo Beach, Calif.. Her boyfriend, Sean Scott, is also an AVP competitor and the couple share a love for volleyball.
"It's just a big part of our lives and we can help each other," Wacholder said. "He has actually been helping Tyra and I one day a week, kind of coaching us and trying to give us little pointers.
"We film our practices and we'll sit together and watch his practice and then my practice. I'll tell him what I think and he'll tell me what he thinks."
Wacholder is described by Wikipedia as "a model and beach volleyball player." She chuckles while emphasizing she's a volleyball player, first and foremost.
"I barely did any modeling ever," she said. "It's funny that it evens says that. I would never have called myself a model, although I did a few things when they came up. I've done well enough as a beach volleyball player to be called one. I didn't do well enough as a model to be called one. But in LA, anybody can say they are a model."
Wacholder has used the offseason and preseason to strengthen herself for the long grind ahead. She's planning on being involved with each event on the Crocs Tour as well as maintaining a hectic international schedule.
"We spend a lot of time in airplanes, airports, hotels and restaurants," she said. "It's hard, but it's also very rewarding and not something you can do forever. You just want to make the most of it while you can."
Another month of practice and a new AVP chapter begins for Wacholder and her new partner.
The Rachel and Tyra combo? Maybe they'll indeed go together like bacon with eggs.

Bruins and the beach
UCLA grads have not met in men's game since 2002
By Keith Dobkowski / AVP.com
"Special that all of us were Bruins? No. Bruins expect to be in the finals," said Jeff Nygaard of the all-UCLA Alumnus finals pairing in 2002's Hermosa Beach Open.
Those 2002 finals pitted Jeff Nygaard and Albert Hannemann against Stein Metzger and Kevin Wong. Combined, the four players won eight national championships at UCLA. Their success with the Bruins indoor has clearly translated to the beach, as Nygaard, Hannemann, Metzger and Wong have combined for 29 Open wins.
But that 2002 Hermosa finals was special. Hannemann and Nygaard defeated their fellow Bruins in three thrilling games -- 18-21, 29-27 and 27-25. For Hannemann, who is entering his 15th year on the beach, Hermosa is his lone win in 191 career starts on the AVP, which includes 61 top-10 finishes.
The 2002 Hermosa Beach Open was just the 10th start of Nygaard's career, and the victory was Nygaard's first, making him just one of three players to win a title since 1986 in one of his first 10 events.
When asked about his first win, Nygaard responded, "[It was] fun. I felt that things were at a great level of volleyball, the crowd in Hermosa was absolutely awesome, there was a buzz in the air about it, and being a part of it was a career highlight."
The AVP landscape has been filled by UCLA Bruins for years. The winningest male and female players in AVP history, Karch Kiraly and Holly McPeak, are Bruins. As are Sinjin Smith, Elaine Youngs, Jenny Johnson Jordan, Annett Davis, Randy Stoklos, Ed Ratledge and Mark Williams, to name just a few.
Even with the AVP sands full of Bruins, the 2002 Hermosa Beach finals was the first time that four UCLA alums appeared in the final match since 1993, when Karch Kiraly-Kent Steffes played Sinjin Smith-Randy Stoklos in the first three finals of the year. Kiraly-Steffes won the first two events in Hawaii and New York, while Smith-Stoklos got their revenge in the third event, in Fort Myers, Fla.
Traditionalists may argue that the 1993 matchup did not truly include four alums, as Steffes never played a game for the UCLA volleyball team, though he did graduate from UCLA in 1995. After transferring from Stanford to UCLA, Steffes was redshirted. During his redshirt season, Steffes opted out of his scholarship in order the play Pro Beach Volleyball full-time.
The AVP women have seen six matches since the 2002 Hermosa Beach finals that featured all UCLA alums. Each time, the final match featured Holly McPeak-Elaine Youngs against Jenny Johnson Jordan-Annett Davis, with McPeak and Youngs leading the series, 4-2.
As for the four men in the Hermosa Beach final in 2002, their ties to UCLA are all part of the record books. Hannemann won a national championship his freshman year (1989) with the Bruins before transferring to Hawaii.
Nygaard, one of UCLA's most storied volleyball players, ended his career as UCLA's all-time leader in aces (123) and ranked second in blocks (650), kills (1,805) and hitting percentage (.427). Nygaard led the Bruins to two national championships (1993, 1995). He earned postseason honors all four years at UCLA, including first-team recognition for three years (1993-95). He was college volleyball's top freshman in 1992 and MVP in 1994 and '95.
Metzger and Wong combined to win five national titles at UCLA. Wong, a three time All-American, won the national title in 1993 and 1995. Metzger was a three-time national champion at UCLA (1993, 1995, 1996), where he earned All-American honors for three consecutive seasons and won the 1996 NCAA MVP and William G. Morgan Award for most outstanding player.
Entering 2007, it looks like another season will pass without an all-Bruins final for both the men and women. Johnson-Jordan and Davis are the only team on either the men's or women's side to boast two UCLA players and at least one AVP title.
As for the four men from the 2002 Hermosa Beach Open finals, two have announced their intentions and two are playing major roles in the annual rumor mill.
Nygaard is set to play with Dax Holdren, a Santa Barbara City College Alumni, while Metzger is playing with Mike Lambert, a Stanford alum. Hannemann is rumored to be playing with Ratledge, which would give UCLA one men's duo on the beach. Meanwhile, Wong, whose name is at the center of the 2007 rumor mill, may play with Canyon Ceman, a Stanford man, Nick Lucena, a Florida State grad, or Ty Loomis, a University of California at Irvine alumnus.
 
Ageless Youngs not slowing down
2002 Tour MVP eyes Olympics, Tour dominance
By Robert Falkoff / AVP.com
Elaine Youngs can't envision herself building a longevity resume in beach volleyball that would match Karch Kiraly's.
Would Youngs, 37, hang in there until age 46 as Kiraly is doing in this, his farewell season on the AVP Tour?
"That's a good one," Youngs said with a chuckle. "Uh, no."
Still, there's a good chance that Youngs will be continuing to serve powerful aces as she approaches her 40th birthday. She's in great shape, hungry for another Olympic medal and looking forward to playing with newest partner Nicole Branagh, who was hampered by an ankle injury after the duo joined forces in the latter portion of the 2006 schedule.
"On the court, I don't think you could tell whether I'm 28 or 37," Youngs said. "I'm making the big push here for the next couple of years leading toward Beijing. Most likely, I'd still have one year left after that. Be done around 39."
Whenever she decides to leave the sport, Youngs will be able to reflect on a sparkling career. But this isn't the time for wistful nostalgia. Youngs is confident there are many more highlights to come as she and Branagh develop a comfort zone.
"We'll probably be the toughest serving team on Tour with two jump-servers," said the six-foot Youngs, who is preparing for the AVP Crocs Tour season-opening event in Miami April 13-15. "Nicole is tall, about [6-foot-1] or [6-foot-2]. We're both really good athletes and we're going to be a tall team. We're a team that's going to put pressure on Kerri [Walsh] and Misty [May-Treanor], I think."
While paired with Rachel Wacholder in 2005, Youngs was part of a team that ended a 50-match win streak by Walsh and May-Treanor. Youngs is hopeful that the Youngs/Branagh unit and other combos will slow the Walsh/May-Treanor victory parade in 2007 and create more drama on the Tour.
"I'd hate to see the fans being bored with women's beach volleyball because Kerri and Misty are winning all the time," Youngs said. "I really do think Nicole and I match up very well with them. We're going to be able to side-out pretty well against them, being that we're big. I think our serving puts pressure on them.
"That's what I have always felt when I played against Kerri and Misty. If I have an unbelievable serving match, then we have a good shot at winning. But if my serve isn't killing them, then I've got Nicole, who has a serve that could be."
Youngs points out that it's not just about one team beating Walsh/May-Treanor in head-to-head competition. The overall tournament field has to be such that Walsh/May-Treanor experience a fatigue factor in working their way through.
"You can't have them just walking into finals and being fresh all the time," Youngs said. "They play a limited number of matches every weekend and a limited number of points because teams aren't making them work. It's definitely a mental battle when you play them because they are so darned good and you just wonder how they make the plays that they do. You just have to put some pressure on them and hope you can keep the game tight and pull out some wins."
After gaining the Bronze Medal at the 2004 Olympics while paired with Holly McPeak, Youngs would love to grab another medal in Beijing.
"Being able to get that medal in Athens was a dream come true," she said. "I remember it like it was yesterday. I feel like I've got another run in me and I'm hungry for a Gold Medal."
Youngs led the 2006 AVP Tour in aces (1.06 per game) and ranked sixth in blocks (.87 per game), second in kill percentage (.606) and fourth in hitting percentage (.473). She was the AVP's Most Valuable Player in 2002.
When "EY" is serving, the fans always take special notice.
"I'm a consistent server," Youngs said. "I don't miss a lot. I'm able to pinpoint where I want to go. I think that just comes with years of playing. And with Nicole, who's one of the best servers on tour, it's a very important asset because we might give up a little bit defensively."
Youngs spends about nine months a year in southern California. Her offseasons take her to Durango, Colo., where she can relax in the open spaces, enjoy the mountain scenery and recharge her competitive battery.
The formula has worked so well that Youngs is still a major force on tour at 37. Maybe she won't go on as long as Kiraly, but there's plenty of quality and quantity associated with her career.
"For Karch to still be doing what he's doing at 46 is unbelievable," Youngs said. "He's amazing."
The fans of the AVP women's Tour will tell you Youngs is amazing, too.

AVP hits St. Pete, May 31-June 2
Pro beach volleyball tournament featuring Misty May-Treanor and Kerri Walsh will take place on Arena Grounds; Esurance announced as title sponsor of Event
AVP.com
LOS ANGELES, March 21, 2007 -- AVP, Inc., a lifestyle sports entertainment company focused on professional beach volleyball, today announced an agreement with the St. Pete Times Forum and the National Hockey League's Tampa Bay Lighting to bring the fast-growing AVP Crocs Tour to the Bay Area. Esurance, a direct-to-consumer auto insurance company, has been named as the title sponsor of the Tampa Bay event.
The AVP Esurance Tampa Open marks the debut of AVP professional beach volleyball in Tampa. At a press conference today, Tampa Bay Lightning and St. Pete Times Forum President Ron Campbell, AVP Representative Gabby Roe, and AVP Professional Beach Volleyball stars Phil Dalhausser and Jen Kessy-Boss announced the agreement.
The new AVP Tour stop in Tampa is one of 18 nationwide events that make up the 2007 AVP Crocs Tour. The Tampa tournament will take place May 31-June 3 on the grounds of the St. Pete Times Forum, home of the Tampa Bay Lightning. As part of the new integrated partnership, the St. Pete Times Forum and the Tampa Bay Lighting will actively assist with the promotion and presentation of the Tampa AVP event, as well as assist in selling all local revenue for the tournament, including tickets, concessions, sponsorships and hospitality.
"The AVP is thrilled to bring professional beach volleyball to Tampa and we look forward to working with the Tampa Bay Lightning on this endeavor," said AVP General Manager Gabby Roe. "Florida has always embraced the growing sport of professional beach volleyball and we can't wait to bring the excitement and action of the AVP Crocs Tour to fans in another part of the state."
"We are excited to welcome this tournament to the grounds of the St. Pete Times Forum", said Ron Campbell, President of the Tampa Bay Lightning and the St. Pete Times Forum. "This event is a first for Tampa, and we look forward to it as we continue to aggressively pursue bringing the best sports and entertainment events in the nation to the Bay Area", he continued.
Gary Tolman, Esurance's CEO stated, "Esurance is very proud to support the AVP in Tampa. The associates at our Tampa office look forward to watching the pros take it to the net. Because we offer our auto insurance online, supporting healthy competition that 'takes it to the net' seems rather fitting."
The AVP Esurance Tampa Open will kick off with an open qualifier on Thursday, May 31 and continue with the main draw throughout the weekend, culminating with the men's and women's finals on Sunday, June 3. More than 150 of the country's top beach volleyball players, including Olympic Gold medalists Kerri Walsh and Misty May-Treanor will compete in the tournament, which will be televised on Fox Sports Net.
About the AVP, Inc.
AVP Pro Beach Volleyball Tour, Inc. is a leading lifestyle sports entertainment company focused on the production, marketing and distribution of professional beach volleyball events worldwide. AVP operates the industry's most prominent national touring series, the AVP Pro Beach Volleyball Tour, which was organized in 1983. Featuring more than 150 of the top American men and women competitors in the sport, AVP is set to stage 18 events throughout the United States in 2007. In 2004, AVP athletes successfully represented the United States during the Olympics in Athens, Greece, winning gold and bronze medals, the first medals won by U.S. women in professional beach volleyball. For more information, please visit www.AVP.com.
About Esurance
Esurance, a subsidiary of White Mountains Insurance Group, Ltd. (NYSE: WTM), provides personal auto insurance direct to consumers online and through select online agents. Esurance is dedicated to constantly improving the way people shop for, buy, and manage their auto insurance. Esurance is one of the fastest growing auto insurance companies in America. By combining the best of technology with industry know-how, Esurance is able to offer hassle-free coverage with 24/7 customer service and claims handling at competitive prices. Through Esurance's Web site, www.esurance.com, customers can get instant quotes, view comparison quotes, buy an Esurance policy, and print their proof of insurance card --all in minutes. Esurance also offers policyholders the ability to make policy changes and file claims instantly online, demonstrating its commitment to improving the entire insurance process from quote to claim.
About the Tampa Bay Lightning and the St. Pete Times Forum
The St. Pete Times Forum, located in downtown Tampa in the Channelside District, is a state-of-the-art sports and entertainment venue, with a capacity of up to 21,500. It is the home of the 2004 Stanley Cup Champion Tampa Bay Lightning hockey club and the former World Champion Tampa Bay Storm arena football team, and hosts more than 200 events annually. Such events include: concerts from top performers around the world, ice shows, circuses, rodeos, wrestling and sporting events such as basketball, soccer, boxing, tennis and many others. From NHL hockey and arena football to Kenny Chesney and the Rolling Stones, the St. Pete Times Forum has something for everyone.
Tickets for the AVP Esurance Tampa Open will go on sale Saturday, March 24 at 10am at the McDonald's Box Office at the St. Pete Times Forum and all Ticketmaster Outlets. To order tickets by phone, call Ticketmaster at 813.287.8844 or 727.898.2100. Day passes are available at the following prices: Limited reserved courtside seats are $44.75, general admission seating is $24.75, children under 18 and college students with identification are $13.75. Prices do not include service charges. For more information please call 813.301.2500 or visit www.stpetetimesforum.com or

'All Smoke and Mirrors'
AVP star Scott turns defensive for '07 season
By Keith Dobkowski / AVP.com
"Sean [Scott] is, without a doubt in anyone's mind, the best 6'5" designated blocker to ever play the game of beach volleyball," said Hans Stolfus in his latest 8 Titles Short piece on AVP.com. Yet fans will find Scott playing defense in 2007 behind the big block of Matt Fuerbringer.
Scott's offseason has been spent making the transition from net to backcourt. Lucky for Scott, he has had the help of two of the AVP best defensive players in making the change: Todd Rogers and Rachel Wacholder.
From 2002-05, Scott partnered with Todd Rogers. Rogers, the 2006 AVP MVP, is the three-time reigning Best Defensive Player Award winner. Together, Rogers and Scott won four titles, including the last three team events of 2005; coincidentally, the last three events of their playing partnership. In 2006, as Rogers made his way to the final of the individual God of the Beach tournament in Las Vegas, he selected Scott as his partner, and together they were victorious once again.
After making the switch to the backcourt, one of Scott's first calls was to his former partner Rogers, who humorously explained defense as, "all smoke and mirrors."
"I have actually have picked up a lot of things from Todd. Both volleyball in general and working on the defensive end. I played with him for four years. I would say the biggest thing is that he does defensively that a lot of guys don't do is he works on the basic movement patterns."
Scott points to Rogers' footwork as being different from most defenders on the Tour, and it allows him to reach balls others cannot get to.
"I will basically try to imitate him [in 2007]," said Scott.
Scott's longtime girlfriend is AVP Star Wacholder. Wacholder, winner of five titles over the past two seasons, won the 2005 Best Defensive Player award.
"I hit her up for tips all the time," said Scott. "The biggest thing she does for me -- not so much defensively, but overall -- she will call me out when I have a bad attitude or when I am not playing as well as I should be. She is my biggest fan and she is my biggest critic. And I appreciate that."
Ultimately, though, the transition to defender falls on Scott. To be successful in the backcourt, Scott says he must improve his ability to dig the hard-driven ball. For practice, Scott has turned back the clock to his indoor days by using a digging machine. The machine fires balls repeatedly at high speeds, forcing Scott to get low and pop the ball up.
Fuerbringer and Scott have also been working with Long Beach State's assistant volleyball coach, Mike D'Alessandro. D'Alessandro played on the AVP Tour from 1984-89, was a five-time USA Volleyball All-American and a three-time USA Volleyball National Champion (1979, 1993, 2000). D'Alessandro has been helping the duo with control, as well as helping Scott move from the right side to the left side.
Even with so much change for Scott in 2007, he expects good results.
"Looking at us on paper, I would say that we would get better the longer that we play together, just because we are a new team. But we both said our season will have some ups and we will have some downs because we are going to have a lot of things we are going to need to work out. But hopefully in two years we will be peaking."
As one of the tallest teams on the beach, Scott and Fuerbringer will be a hefty challenge for all opposing teams as their sideout percentage will surely rank near the top of the Tour.
"I think we are going to have to serve tough and sideout. Hopefully, we can block some balls at the net. And defensively, we are going to have to continue to learn, take baby steps. If we can get a few digs here and there, we will be able to compete with anyone," Scott said.
What remains to be seen is whether the towering duo will enter the record books with an AVP first, the double block.
"We haven't worked on it yet, but maybe I will bring it up in practice this week."

AVP Announces Three-Year Extension of Sponsorship Deal With Nature Valley Granola Bars
 ~ Nature Valley Granola Bars Become the 'Official Natural Energy Source of
the AVP' Through 2009 and Product Packaging to Feature AVP Athletes
LOS ANGELES, March 27 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/ -- AVP, Inc. (OTC Bulletin
Board: AVPI), a lifestyle sports entertainment company focused on
professional beach volleyball, today announced a three-year extension to
its sponsorship agreement with Nature Valley Granola Bars, making it the
"Official Natural Energy Source of the AVP Tour" through 2009.
    Nature Valley Granola Bars has been a sponsor of the AVP Pro Beach
Volleyball Tour since 2003. The brand, which encourages a healthy, active,
outdoor lifestyle through its products, shares the AVP's commitment to
world-class athletic competition.
    "We are thrilled to extend our successful relationship with Nature
Valley," said Leonard Armato, CEO and commissioner of the AVP. "Nature
Valley has been a great partner of the AVP Tour since 2003 and through the
company's active and robust marketing and retail campaigns, they have
helped us to reach a larger audience and created even more excitement about
the events. We not only appreciate Nature Valley's involvement to date, but
enthusiastically look forward to continuing our mutually beneficial
relationship over the next three years."
    "We are excited to continue our partnership with AVP," said Robin
Karkowski-Schelar, Marketing Associate, Nature Valley Granola Bars. "Nature
Valley is committed to helping make nature enjoyable and accessible for
everyone. The AVP's unique on-beach experience aligns well with our core
consumers active lifestyle."
    Other highlights of the deal include:
    *  Three year deal exclusivity as the "Official Natural Energy Source of
       the AVP" in the category of all grain, cereal and energy bars
    *  AVP-themed packaging of Granola Bar Boxes to feature AVP Athletes and
       the '07 Tour scheduled to hit retails stores before July
    *  Television presence, including commercial units during network and
       cable television
    *  Player likeness and AVP logo usage rights in "Where's Your's" campaign
    *  Promotions with retail partners
    *  Sampling booth in Sponsor Village at each Tour location
    The sponsorship deal will also include integrated activation and
marketing programs that incorporates AVP imagery throughout national
outlets.
    About the AVP, Inc.
    AVP Pro Beach Volleyball Tour, Inc. is a leading lifestyle sports
entertainment company focused on the production, marketing and distribution
of professional beach volleyball events worldwide. AVP operates the
industry's most prominent national touring series, the AVP Pro Beach
Volleyball Tour, which was organized in 1983. Featuring more than 150 of
the top American men and women competitors in the sport, AVP is set to
stage 18 events throughout the United States in 2007. In 2004, AVP athletes
successfully represented the United States during the Olympics in Athens,
Greece, winning gold and bronze medals, the first medals won by U.S. women
in professional beach volleyball. For more information, please visit
http://www.avp.com.
    About Nature Valley Granola Bars
    Since 1975, Nature Valley Granola Bars has used wholesome ingredients
to make the best tasting granola bars around. Featuring 7 different types
of products, including cereal, Nature Valley provides snacks for people who
want to enjoy a healthy, active, outdoor lifestyle. For more information,
please visit http://www.naturevalley.com.

AVP Reports Record 2006 Revenue Up 38%; 2006 Gross Profit Up 80% Year-Over-Year
~ 2006 Gross Profit Margin Grows to 32%

    LOS ANGELES, March 28 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/ -- AVP, Inc. (OTC Bulletin
Board: AVPI), a lifestyle sports entertainment company focused on
professional beach volleyball, today announced record financial results for
its full year ended December 31, 2006. AVP generated record revenue of
$21.5 million in 2006, an increase of 38% year-over-year.
    2006 Milestones:

    *  Record annual revenue of $21.5 million, a 38% increase from
       $15.6 million in 2005.
    *  Gross Profit up 80% year-over-year
    *  Sponsorship/advertising revenues up 37% year-over year.
    *  Gross profit margin increased to 32% compared to 24% in 2005.
    *  Net Loss decreased to $(0.34) million compared to $(8.96) million in
       2005.
    *  Local Promoter Fees and Local Revenue increased 72% to $2.48 million,
       compared to $1.44 million in 2005.
    "As we close a very successful 2006 season, we are excited to report
substantial improvements across several financial measurements, including
record annual revenue and gross profit margins," said Leonard Armato, Chief
Executive Officer of AVP, Inc. "We accomplished a number of key objectives
this year, generating a 37% increase in advertising and sponsorship revenue
over the prior year, as well as increased attendance, tickets sales and
media coverage. We continue to grow our tour, adding new stops each season.
We held 16 events in 2006 (compared to 14 in 2005) and have 18 events
scheduled for the 2007 Crocs AVP season. We also continue to make solid
progress attracting new sponsors and advertisers and renewing and extending
our existing agreements. Recent sponsorship announcements include
agreements with McDonald's, Hilton, Schick, Nature Valley and Banana Boat."
    "In addition, throughout 2006 we continued to successfully transition
to a promoter based operating model, with 8 of our 16 events having local
promoters. This promoter-based model contributed to a 72% increase in local
promoter fees and local revenue and helped improve our 2006 gross profit
margin to 32% compared to 24% in 2005. Looking to 2007, 10 of our 18 events
will be produced using promoter arrangements, which will include deals with
pre-eminent sports promoters such as the Brooklyn Sports & Entertainment
Group, Hicks Sports Marketing Group, Miami Heat Enterprises, San
Francisco's Giant Group Enterprises and Tampa Bay Lightening, to name a
few. The transition to a promoter model is reducing our expenses,
generating higher ticket sales and local revenues, and enabling us to
better extend our brand into the local communities."
    "Going forward, we remain diligently focused on managing our expenses
and achieving profitability as we continue to grow our advertising and
sponsorship base. We look forward to increasing our brand's extension
throughout the United States and anticipate conducting indoor wintertime
events in the fourth quarter of 2007 and first quarter of 2008. We were
pleased with the success of the tour in 2006 and are confident that our
focus and dedication to growth and profitability will provide us the
groundwork to achieve even greater success in 2007," Mr. Armato concluded.
    2006 Financial Results
    Total revenue for 2006 reached a record $21.5 million, a 38% increase
over total revenue of $15.6 million for 2005. During the course of the
entire year, the majority of AVP's revenues are derived from sponsorship
and advertising contracts with national and local sponsors and advertisers
along with local event revenue and ancillary revenue. AVP recognizes
sponsorship and advertising revenue as well as event costs during the tour,
as events occur. The Company's 2006 beach volleyball tournament season
began in early April and continued through late September and as a result,
the majority of AVP's revenues were recognized in the second and third
quarters of the calendar year.
    The Company's net loss, excluding deemed dividend, in 2006 was $(0.34)
million, or $(0.02) per share, compared to a net loss of $(8.96) million,
or $(1.03) per share, for 2005.
    Total event costs for 2006 were $14.7 million for sixteen events,
compared to $11.8 million in the same period last year, which included
fourteen events. The average event cost during 2006 was $0.9 million, up 9%
from $0.8 million in 2005. The cost increase is primarily attributable to
increases in the number of events from 14 to 16 and in the size and scope
of events to accommodate and entertain a larger fan base.
    Total operating expenses for 2006 were $7.4 million, a substantial
improvement from the $12.7 million reported in 2005. Total operating
expenses for 2006, excluding stock based expenses, were $7.0 million. The
company had $5.1 million in cash and cash equivalents on December 31, 2006.
    Business Outlook and Financial Guidance
    AVP will give 2007 guidance on our first quarter 2007 conference call.

    Conference Call
    AVP Inc., will host a conference call and webcast on Thursday, March
29th at 10:00 a.m. Pacific Time (1:00 pm Eastern Time) to discuss its 2006
financial results. Those wishing to participate in the live call should
dial (800) 262-2143 and give the Company name "AVP." A phone replay of the
call will be available for one week beginning approximately one hour after
the call's conclusion by dialing (800) 405-2236 and entering 11086925
followed by the "#" sign when prompted for a code. To access the live or
archived webcast of the call, go to the Investor Relations section of AVP's
website at http://www.avp.com.
    About the AVP, Inc.
    AVP Pro Beach Volleyball Tour, Inc. is a leading lifestyle sports
entertainment company focused on the production, marketing and distribution
of professional beach volleyball events worldwide. AVP operates the
industry's most prominent national touring series, the AVP Pro Beach
Volleyball Tour, which was organized in 1983. Featuring more than 150 of
the top American men and women competitors in the sport, AVP is set to
stage 18 events throughout the United States in 2007. In 2004, AVP athletes
successfully represented the United States during the Olympics in Athens,
Greece, winning gold and bronze medals, the first medals won by U.S. women
in professional beach volleyball. For more information, please visit
http://www.avp.com.
    All above-mentioned trademarks are the property of their respective
owners.
    Some of the information in this press release may contain projections
or other forward-looking statements regarding future events or the future
financial performance of the Company. We wish to caution you that these
statements involve risks and uncertainties and actual results might differ
materially from those in the forward-looking statements, if we receive less
sponsorship and advertising revenue than anticipated, or if attendance is
adversely affected by unfavorable weather. Event-related expenses, such as
for the stadium, transportation and accommodations, or security might be
greater than expected; or marketing or administrative costs might be
increased by our hiring, not currently planned, of a particularly qualified
prospect. Additional factors have been detailed in the Company's filings
with the Securities and Exchange Commission, including our recent filings
on Forms 10-K and 10-Q.
                        - Financial tables to follow -
                                AVP, INC
                         CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS

                                                December 31,      December 31,
                                                    2006              2005

    ASSETS
    CURRENT ASSETS
      Cash and cash equivalents                  $5,052,636        $1,143,345
      Accounts receivable, net of
       allowance for doubtful accounts of
       $25,193 and $49,232                        2,653,473           484,770
      Prepaid expenses                              242,007           158,054
      Other current assets - current
       portion                                      301,477           145,768
      TOTAL CURRENT ASSETS                        8,249,593         1,931,937

    PROPERTY AND EQUIPMENT, net                     340,054           288,409

    OTHER ASSETS                                    105,373           455,192

      TOTAL ASSETS                               $8,695,020        $2,675,538

    LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDERS' EQUITY
     (DEFICIENCY)
    CURRENT LIABILITIES
      Notes payable                                     $--          $600,071
      Accounts payable                              529,331           711,303
      Accrued expenses                            1,049,439         1,702,424
      Deferred revenue                            1,056,960           116,000
      TOTAL CURRENT LIABILITIES                   2,635,730         3,129,798

    NON-CURRENT LIABILITIES                         190,766           150,000

      TOTAL LIABILITIES                           2,826,496         3,279,798

    COMMITMENTS AND CONTINGENCIES

    STOCKHOLDERS' EQUITY (DEFICIENCY)

      Preferred stock, 2,000,000 shares
       authorized:

      Series A convertible preferred
       stock, $.001 par value, 1,000,000
       shares authorized, no shares issued and
       outstanding                                       --                --

      Series B convertible preferred
       stock, $.001 par value, 250,000
       shares authorized, 69,548 and 94,488
       shares issued and outstanding                     70                94

      Common stock, $.001 par value,
       80,000,000 shares authorized,
       19,751,838 and 11,669,931 shares
       issued and outstanding                        19,752            11,670

      Additional paid-in capital                 39,077,065        32,183,810

      Accumulated deficit                       (33,228,363)      (32,799,834)

      TOTAL STOCKHOLDERS' EQUITY
       (DEFICIENCY)                               5,868,524          (604,260)

      TOTAL LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDERS'
       EQUITY (DEFICIENCY)                       $8,695,020        $2,675,538



                                   AVP, INC
                    CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS

                                                   Year Ended December 31,
                                                   2006               2005

    REVENUE
        Sponsorships/Advertising (1)           $17,388,458        $12,718,471
        Other                                    4,083,622          2,862,811
        TOTAL REVENUE                           21,472,080         15,581,282


    EVENT COSTS (2)                             14,665,430         11,800,710
        GROSS PROFIT                             6,806,650          3,780,572

    OPERATING EXPENSES
        Sales and Marketing (3)                  2,959,216          2,159,603
        Administrative (4)                       4,451,576         10,528,296
        TOTAL OPERATING EXPENSES                 7,410,792         12,687,899

        OPERATING LOSS                            (604,142)        (8,907,327)

    OTHER INCOME (EXPENSE)
        Interest expense                           (23,659)          (167,859)
        Interest income                            181,003            112,030
        Gain on warrant derivative                 111,042                 --
        TOTAL OTHER INCOME (EXPENSE)               268,386            (55,829)

        LOSS BEFORE INCOME TAXES                  (335,756)        (8,963,156)

    INCOME TAXES                                      (800)              (800)

        NET LOSS                                  (336,556)        (8,963,956)


    Deemed dividend to Series B
    Preferred Stock Shareholders                    91,973                 --

    Net Loss Available to
    Common Shareholders                          $(428,529)       $(8,963,956)

    Loss per common share:
        Basic                                       $(0.03)            $(1.03)
        Diluted                                     $(0.03)            $(1.03)

    Shares used in computing loss per
     share:
        Basic                                   16,918,490          8,681,388
        Diluted                                 16,918,490          8,681,388


    (1) Sponsorship/Advertising includes $252,842 and $0 in stock based
        contra-revenue for the years ended December 31, 2006 and 2005,
        respectively.

    (2) Event costs include stock based expenses of $1,000,000 and $0 for the
        years ended December 31, 2006 and 2005, respectively.

    (2) Sales and marketing expenses include stock based expenses of $119,942
        and $0 for the years ended December 31, 2006 and 2005, respectively.

    (3) Administrative expenses include stock based expenses of $293,190 and
        $5,640,132 for the years ended December 31, 2006 and 2005,
        respectively.
SOURCE AVP, Inc.

AVP.com, the Most Visited Volleyball Site on the Net, Re-Launches for the 2007 AVP Pro Beach Volleyball Season
AVP Pro Beach Volleyball Tour's website, AVP.com, will offer volleyball fans across the world the most comprehensive volleyball information on the world wide web.
(PRWEB) March 29, 2007 -- AVP Pro Beach Volleyball Tour is thrilled to announce the re-launch of AVP.com, the most comprehensive volleyball website on the net. With deeper content, live streaming video, video archives, community functionality, robust statistics, message boards, player blogs and fantasy games, AVP.com is the fan's online destination for everything volleyball.
"We are thrilled with the new AVP.com, knowing that Beach Volleyball fans across the world will experience AVP Pro Beach Volleyball like never before," said Leonard Armato, CEO and Commissioner of the AVP. "The new site will offer a combination of deeper content, rich media, community functionality and a more complete statistical package that will clearly enhance the user experience and make AVP.com a daily destination for AVP fans."
The AVP's re-launch of their website comes in conjunction with the start of the 2007 AVP Crocs Tour, an 18-stop professional beach volleyball tour. As the fan base of the AVP and the sport of beach volleyball continues to grow, the new AVP.com will serve as a portal to enhance the fan experience.
Key features of the new AVP.com include:
Live Streaming Video -- Fans can watch action from every AVP Crocs Tour event live on AVP.com
One-stop-shop for AVP Ticketing -- Tickets for all events will be available online and can be ordered and printed directly from the website. The main ticketing page includes links to event details for each stop on the AVP Crocs Tour.
Tour Event Pages -- Every stop on the AVP Crocs Tour has its own area complete with a Gameday Central featuring previews, live scores, stats, recaps, multimedia features, as well as ticketing and venue information.
Expanded Player Profiles -- Fans can study the statistics of Tour veterans like three-time Olympic Gold medalist Karch Kiraly, Gold medalist Misty May-Treanor, Gold medalists Kerri Walsh, and Olympic Bronze medalist Holly McPeak, in addition to Tour newcomers like 2006 AVP Rookies of the Year April Ross and Logan Tom. Player profiles will feature video clips, pictures, headlines, season/career statistics and biography data.
New Multimedia Features -- New multimedia features include a main video page updated regularly with new clips and videos and expansive photo galleries.
Volleyball Nation -- The New AVP.com will help beach volleyball fans connect with friends, start your own leagues, post messages, win prizes on the AVP E-Team, and sign-up for Volleyball Nation newsletters. Additional community features will be added that allow fans to generate their own content and grow networks of like-minded fans and participants.
The AVP Crocs Tour gets under way April 14 and 15 in Miami, Florida, at Bicentennial Park. The AVP Cuervo Gold Crown Miami Open is the first of three Cuervo Gold Crown events. The second will take place in Dallas April 19 - 22 and the final in Huntington Beach May 3 - 6, where the largest check in AVP history, $100,000, will be awarded.
For more information and tickets, log on to the brand new AVP.com today.

HB AVP Open fees won't change this year
But volleyball event's dates are moving -- to May -- and permit to add more paid seating was just for July.
By Andrea Sudano
STAFF WRITER
South Bay beach volleyball fans can count on another year of mostly free admission to the Hermosa Beach Open after all.
The tournament's owners will continue charging admission to a quarter of spectators at this year's tournament, rather than the 90 percent of fans approved last month by the California Coastal Commission, said Dave Williams, market director for the Association of Volleyball Professionals.
But the freer policy is more of a technicality than charity on the AVP's part.
The AVP has agreed to charge 25 percent of spectators admission in exchange for moving Hermosa Beach's tournament up a couple of months, said Teresa Henry, South Coast District manager for the Coastal Commission.
Traditionally a July event, this year's tournament is now scheduled for May 17-20 to accommodate a recently added tournament stop in Long Beach.
In February, when a divided Coastal Commission unexpectedly granted the AVP permission to charge 90 percent of spectators admission to Hermosa Beach tournaments for five years, that extended to the tournament scheduled for July only, Henry said.
To charge almost all spectators admission at a May event, the AVP would have to apply for an entirely new permit, and appear before the Coastal Commission again, possibly jeopardizing its new 90 percent seating ratio, Henry said.
Instead, it was agreed that the event could move to May but would stick with last year's admission ratio.
This is the latest development in an ongoing battle for the AVP to charge more spectators admission fees at its California tournaments. Association executives have long argued South Bay tournament stops were the biggest financial duds of all tournaments.
But the AVP has faced fierce opposition from local government, environmentalists, free-access advocates and the Coastal Commission -- at least until February, that is.
Hermosa Beach resident Dennis "Duke" Noor has been one of the AVP's loudest critics in recent months, and said a cheaper tournament this year is fine by him. "Hopefully, that will be a sign of the times, a sign for the future that that's the way it should be," he said of the higher ratio of free seating. "... It's good news for me."
But it likely won't last forever. The AVP has two years to activate a permit, and plans to charge 90 percent of spectators at Hermosa Beach's 2008 tournament. Also, the Manhattan Beach City Council opted last month to loosen its admission restrictions. The Coastal Commission will weigh in on that decision, then the council will settle on an admission ratio, likely in time for next year's tournament.
The paid seating includes a mix of ticket prices from $20 to $40, depending on where the spectator sits.

AVP Media Day kicks off '07 season
18 tour stops and new online home highlight new season
By Mike Scarr / AVP.com
BEVERLY HILLS, Calif. -- The AVP Crocs Tour was looking for a splash and got it with the AVP's annual media day Thursday afternoon.
Lounging poolside at the Beverly Hilton, AVP Commissioner Leonard Armato and company delivered the message that the tour is ready to embark again with the 2007 version featuring a junket of 18 U.S. stops.
"Starting with new cities like Boston and venturing into the heart of America in Cincinnati to familiar sites like Las Vegas and the Southern California events, we think this year's tour will be exciting," Armato said.
Joining Armato on the dais were Ron Snyder, Crocs chief executive, Matt Hart, president and COO of Hilton Hotels and Bob Bowman, president and chief executive, MLB Advanced Media.
With an increase in prize money from $3.5 to $4 million for the upcoming season that is split evenly between the men's and women's teams, Crocs renewed its support of the AVP Tour. Snyder was also quick to recognize an opportunity when he saw a barefoot Phil Dalhausser take the stage. Snyder brought him a pair of Crocs.
"The reason we're the title sponsor is we want to sell more shoes," Snyder said. "While that may seem to be the only reason, what we want to do is build our brand. This is the fastest growing sports property right now. As we help grow the tour we can help grow the sport in other countries."
That growth will also be given a broader platform this season and the increased exposure is what brought Bowman to town. With the Internet muscle of MLBAM, which produces MLB.com, Bowman has partnered with the tour to re-launch AVP.com.
The site has been given a new look and with that will come live streaming video from as many as four courts per event.
"This is a great and exciting sport," Bowman said. "There are only six exciting sports and this, along with baseball, is one of them."
Bowman helped build MLB.com into one of the most visited sports sites on the Internet. That is due in part to the popularity of the national pastime, but also through a multiple tier of media products. The hope for 2007 is to do the same for professional beach volleyball.
"These athletes are phenomenal," Bowman said. "In the digital world, what makes the difference is authenticity and that is what we want to bring to AVP.com."
But Thursday's affair was far from corporate boardroom dull. The quick introductory speeches gave way to player introductions by emcee and AVP announcer Chris "Geeter" McGee and a brief fashion show, featuring this season's on-court player apparel.
Most of the top players were present for the event, including legend Karch Kiraly, who was making his final appearance at a media day as a player on the AVP Tour. Kiraly announced that his new partner for 2007 will be Kevin Wong, a fellow UCLA Bruin.
Kiraly was quick to point out where his sentiments will lie this weekend.
"We're pulling for UCLA. No. 100 this weekend," Kiraly said, referring to the men's basketball team that has a berth in the NCAA Final Four and will play Florida on Saturday. A championship Monday night would be the school's 100th, an NCAA record.
While earning All-America honors all four years at the school, Kiraly also helped to contribute three titles as UCLA won volleyball championships in 1979, 1981 and 1982.
Kiraly is not the only player that will be sharing the sand with a new partner this season. On the men's side, the new teams are: Casey Jennings and Mark Williams; Matt Fuerbringer and Sean Scott; Dax Holden and Jeff Nygaard; Eric Fonoimoana and Chad Turner; and Dain Blanton and Scotty Lane.
The new women's teams are: Rachel Wacholder and Tyra Turner; Jennifer Boss and Keao Burdine; Nancy Mason and April Ross; Dianne DeNecochea and Barbra Fontana; and Tatiana Minello and Carrie Dodd.
Holly McPeak will essentially be breaking in a new partner. She and Logan Tom teamed up in two events last year, and while McPeak knows there will be a period of adjustment, she is excited about the season.
"She is a phenomenal athlete," McPeak said of Tom. "We're aiming for the top."
Misty May-Treanor, the two-time reigning women's MVP, will be looking to eclipse McPeak's record of 68 victories on tour. After leading the tour in victories in three of the last four years, May-Treanor also realizes that she and partner Kerri Walsh will be targets for the competition but mostly her excitement was directed toward the upcoming season.
"Beach volleyball in Boston," May-Treanor said. "It's great that these cities want to see us play."
It's a national story that was kicked off in pure L.A. style.

May-Treanor, Walsh fix what's not broken
The Golden Girls, irked that they might have plateaued, turn to a new coach as another AVP beach volleyball season approaches.
By Phil Collin
Staff writer
Is this even fair?
The team that wins every single tournament, the one that wins the Olympic gold medal, the one with two two-time MVPs, has some perception of doubt so it turns to volleyball's greatest player for advice?
It seems like overkill for Misty May-Treanor and Kerri Walsh to solicit tips from Karch Kiraly, but when the goal is utter dominance, well, May-Treanor and Walsh have a pretty good idea how to attain it.
Once again the Golden Girls will be the focal point when the Association of Volleyball Professionals tour begins in two weeks in Miami. But never before has the laid-back sport of beach volleyball been more serious.
The AVP has a grind of 18 tournaments in which the players will chase more than $4 million in prize money. But 2007 also represents a key year for qualifying for the 2008 Beijing Olympics. This means a nice, tidy commute to Europe as many as four times from June through October.
Naturally, it's expected that May-Treanor and Walsh, who captured 16 tournament titles a year ago, will be on top at the end. Yet even that is not considered momentum to them when their own expectations are as high or higher than anyone else could dream up.
So the dominant team fired its coach, Dane Selznick.
"We were with Dane for so long, and we liked Dane, but it was just time to try something new,'' May-Treanor said Thursday at the AVP launch party.
"It's like anything when you've been together for a while, and we were kind of ... I wouldn't say plateauing, but you have to find things because we don't want to break up, we don't want to go our separate ways, so what's the other thing we can do and try to spice up our game?''
That brought a startled "Um, excuse me, the best team in the world considered splitting?'' into the conversation.
"No, no, no,'' May-Treanor said. "We never brought it up. We never thought about that, but we were both frustrated with the plateau we were stuck on and it's like what do you do? And the only thing was to try to ask somebody else, 'What can you see in our game that could be different? What can we try?' So that was our solution.''
Kiraly coached, coaxed and mentored May-Treanor and Walsh, then arranged for former Pepperdine, U.S. national team and beach standout Troy Tanner to ease into the equation as the duo's new coach.
"Dane got us to the level where we were, and maybe there was someone else that maybe has different insight that can maybe get us to the next level and then the next level,'' May-Treanor said. "You're always changing it up and moving.''
Their challenge domestically will come from a cast of rearranged teams, for the most part. Elaine Youngs will continue with Nicole Branagh after they teamed up last year at midseason. Rachel Wacholder is now playing with Tyra Turner, Holly McPeak with Logan Tom and '05 Rookie of the Year April Ross is joining Nancy Mason.
The top three teams on the men's side return intact, with Mike Lambert and Stein Metzger (five wins in '06), and Phil Dalhausser and Todd Rogers (eight wins) being the early favorites to capture the two U.S. Olympic team spots.
Sean Rosenthal and Jake Gibb, who opened last season with a win in Fort Lauderdale and closed it with a win in Acapulco, Mexico, remain a threat.
The longtime team of Casey Jennings and Matt Fuerbringer has parted, with Jennings turning to former UCLA standout Mark Williams and the 6-foot-7 Fuerbringer hooking up with 6-5 Sean Scott as the beach's new twin towers.
The tour is a common opponent. In addition to criss-crossing the U.S., there are four FIVB tournaments in a five-week span in June and July. Last year, Lambert and Metzger had 19 consecutive weeks of action. This year they face a 21-week run.
"Once that season hits, you come home Monday, take care of your body on Tuesday, go to the gym, see your therapist or your (masseur) or your chiropractor, Wednesday you practice and Thursday you travel. ... It's a grind,'' Lambert said. "You have to get out there and it's so competitive you always have to find that fire.''
 
Mariano trains with the best
Ryan Mariano uses fitness to build on 2006
By Jackie Chiuchiarelli / AVP.com
This offseason, there is no rest for many AVP athletes. While some players spent it playing indoor volleyball overseas, others stayed closer to home, braving the beach fog every morning to train. Ryan Mariano, who just came off of his best season ever, has big goals for the 2007 season. He hopes to be more of a consistent Sunday player with partner Larry Witt and win that first big paycheck. To help him achieve these goals, he decided to stick with the offseason regimen he began the year before. He spent six weeks training at Athlete's Performance in Tempe, Ariz., with some of the most dynamic young athletes in the world.
Mariano describes his training this off-season as "completely off the charts -- best training I have ever had." Timing it to coincide with the NFL Combine training program, Mariano arrived at the Tempe facility to find 70 first-day projected NFL draft picks getting themselves ready for the biggest try-out of their lives. Training with an array of athletes from quarterback Jamarcus Russell from LSU, the projected top pick in April's draft, to Major League Baseball players Jason Schmidt, Brian Roberts and Kevin Youkilis, elevated Mariano's game physically and mentally.
Mariano credits some of his off-season training success to his company of future and pro athletes in the weight room.  He was amazed by the amount they could lift, how fast they were, and their intense plyometric training.
"It really pushed me to work out harder because you are working out next to Jamarcus Russell, who is most likely going to be the No. 1 draft pick. You watch him throwing weight around and you can't wait to start working out.  It was a full-time job. From eight in the morning to five at night, I was at this facility. Two-a-day work outs, eating and training with these superstars -- it was unreal, top-of-the-line experience."
Outside the weight room, Mariano enjoyed watching Jamarcus Russell throw the football.
"The field in Arizona was exactly 100 yards, no end zone. Jamarcus was playing catch and the guys were actually relaying the ball back to him.  It looked like someone was hitting a golf ball. It was unbelievable to watch him."
The other athletes reciprocated Mariano's admiration.
"They all admired my job as a volleyball player. One commented, 'You get to go to the beach everyday. That is your job. Your office is on the sand.'"
Three-time MLB all-star pitcher Jason Schmidt has attended the Manhattan Beach Open and was amazed by George Roumain and Misty May.  He could not understand how "that large of a human being as George can jump that much and survive."
For Mariano, "It was neat to talk to superstar athletes about how amazed they were by the AVP athletes because we do the same thing with them. It is like a mutual admiration."
Of course, no conversation about the AVP would be complete without reference to the beautiful girls that attend the events.  Many of the football guys wanted to know about the girls.
One commented, "In your job, you must come around a lot of chicks. They are all over the place around the beach."
Mariano enjoyed spending his downtime talking to other athletes about anything and everything.
"Not only were they killer athletes, they were super nice people. It was an unbelievable experience."
While many of the athletes Mariano trained with will be enjoying their last few Sunday's with their families and friends before the NFL Draft or the 162-game baseball season, Mariano will be out in the sand with partner Larry Witt battling to get to Sunday play. His hard work and offseason dedication should leave him very confident to compete in many more given Sundays.
 
Beach volleyball coming to L.B.
May-Treanor and Davis will play in July 19-22 event.
By Kirby Lee, Special to the Press-Telegram
Article Launched: 03/30/2007 04:08:24 AM PDT
BEVERLY HILLS - It will be a homecoming for St. Anthony High graduate Annett Davis when the AVP Pro Beach Volleyball Tour makes a stop in Long Beach in July. For Long Beach State Athletic Hall of Famer Misty May-Treanor, it will be just like home.
Davis and May-Treanor expressed their enthusiasm at a Tour Launch part party at the Beverly Hilton on Thursday night where Long Beach was announced among nine new cities for the record 18-tournament schedule.
The Long Beach event on July 19-22 will be among the most sentimental events for May-Treanor, the 2004 Olympic gold medalist and wife of Florida Marlins catcher Matt Treanor. The couple splits time between residences in Long Beach and Florida.
May-Treanor, the co-most valuable player on Long Beach State's undefeated 1998 NCAA championship team, had closely followed former Long Beach mayor Beverly O'Neill's efforts to bring the AVP to Long Beach over the years.
"It finally happened," said May-Treanor, 29. "Long Beach State has always been a dynasty in volleyball but this is really going to put Long Beach on the map for beach volleyball."
One of the biggest challenges of May-Treanor and her partner Kerri Walsh could come from Davis and Jenny
Johnson-Jordan, who ended May-Treanor and Walsh's record 89-match win streak in 2004.
For Davis and Jordan, former UCLA teammates who have played on the beach together since 1997, the accomplishment was particularly satisfying after both giving birth to children in 2001. They also sat out the 2005 season because of pregnancy of their second children.
"When both had our second kids and cut back on our play, we both said that we weren't finished yet," said Davis, 33.

Fuerbringer swaps partners
By MATT SZABO
Estancia High graduate Matt Fuerbringer has made quite a career of playing beach volleyball.
Fuerbringer, 33, who now lives in Redondo Beach, ended last year ranked fourth in the AVP with partner Casey Jennings. It was the first time in their four seasons together that they had finished lower than third.
But they decided to move on in the offseason and the 6-foot-7 Fuerbringer will now pair with Sean Scott, when the season opens April 13-16 with the Miami Open.
At Thursday's AVP Tour launch party at the Beverly Hilton Hotel, Fuerbringer said deciding to part with Jennings was strictly a business move.
"I think we ended on a good note," Fuerbringer said. "He's still one of my good friends. It's like the first girlfriend. We accomplished a lot of stuff. We had our first tournament win together, we won four tournaments, only three teams won last year and we were one of them. We were a great team."
But both players longed to be ranked No. 1 and decided to move on. Fuerbringer said he is excited about pairing with Scott. Like Fuerbringer, Scott usually has played blocker, which Fuerbringer said will add a measure of versatility to their partnership.
"If I'm blocking and we're not scoring points, I can send him up there with full confidence," Fuerbringer said. "It just gives us another look, another option. If things are going great, you don't need it, but if you start to struggle it helps to have another option to change it up."
Fuerbringer, a four-time All-American at Stanford and a member of the school's 1997 National Championship team, won the Seaside Heights Open last July for his only 2006 AVP Tour victory. Coincidentally, he and Jennings beat Scott and his former teammate Dax Holdren in a close championship match, 16-21, 21-12, 17-15.
FUERBRINGER IN TOUCH
Fuerbringer remains in touch with his Estancia ties, even if he was more known for basketball in those days. He said he still talks regularly to former basketball coach Tim O'Brien, who coached Fuerbringer on the Eagles' 1990-91 CIF Division III state championship team.
O'Brien now coaches at Northwood High in Irvine, where his son, Chris, was a senior who averaged a team-high 19.6 points per game last season for the Timberwolves.
"I went to watch a game," Fuerbringer said. "[Chris] was a baby when I was a sophomore in high school. It put me in my place with how old I'm getting."
ROSS REMEMBERS WHEN
For Newport Harbor High graduate April Ross, last year was a season of adjustment.
Ross, who helped Newport Harbor High to back-to-back CIF Division I state championships, went on to help USC to back-to-back NCAA Championships in 2002 and '03. In 2003, she was the NCAA Player of the Year.
But Ross, 24, is now on the AVP Tour. And, even though she earned Rookie of the Year honors last year and had two ninth-place finishes with teammate Keo Burdine, she said it was a very tough adjustment from indoor volleyball to beach volleyball.
"I'd say it was harder than I thought it would be," said the 6-1 Ross, who will team with tour veteran Nancy Mason this year. "I was really frustrated when I first came out, and I felt like I couldn't do anything. It took me about half the season to actually feel comfortable in the sand, and I'm still getting more and more comfortable."
But Ross credited Newport Harbor Coach Dan Glenn for first getting her into beach volleyball. The Sailors still have a beach court on campus, and Ross recalled Glenn making the team work out on the sand.
"Of course, I hated it then, but I think it benefited me in the long run," said Ross, who resides in Diamond Bar. "Having Dan Glenn as a coach was really crucial for me and the success I've achieved so far. He made sure I was an all-around player."
LAMBERT HAS EXPERIENCE
Mike Lambert, by contrast, is already at the top of the game. The Costa Mesa resident who grew up in Hawaii was part of the AVP Team of the Year last year with Stein Metzger, and won five different events.
Lambert, who teamed with legendary partner Karch Kiraly in 2004 and was named AVP Most Valuable Player, said sticking with Metzger this year was an easy choice.
"It's nice when you can play with the same partner a few years in a row," said Lambert, 32. "This offseason we got to work on a bunch of different stuff, that'll hopefully make us better and more dynamic. It's really important to be on the same page and nail the game plan down."
He said he's looking forward to the FIVB World Championships, to be held in Switzerland on July 25-29. The event is worth triple points for qualifying for the 2008 Olympics.
"If you can get a medal in the World Championships, with triple points, you're putting yourself in a great position to qualify and be one of the two teams representing the U.S. in the Olympics," Lambert said. "Come talk to us at the end of July, and we'll be smiling or we'll be pouting."
NICE TIMING LAMBERT
Lambert had a son, Jack, who was born last October, coinciding nicely with the end of the volleyball season.
But during the season he has little time to do much of anything but play volleyball. He said this was shown after the AVP Chicago Open last July, which he and Metzger won. They then had a quick turnaround to an FIVB event in France.
"Last year, we played in the final in Chicago, and then showered at the site with a hose and a bar of soap," Lambert said. "Then, I threw on my running shoes, jumped in a cab and I'm eating potato chips, because it was the only food I could get before my 12-hour flight to Europe. As soon as you get off the plane in Europe, you're jet-lagged, but you've got to practice and play the next day. It's just doing things on the fly."
GIBB EYES STRONG START
Jake Gibb, a Costa Mesa resident, hopes to get over the hump this year with partner Sean Rosenthal.
Last season, Gibb and Rosenthal won the season-opening event in Fort Lauderdale and went to five other championship matches. But they finished second each time, three of the losses coming to Lambert and Metzger.
However, they rebounded to win the season-ending FIVB event in Acapulco, Mexico.
"Taking second, that's tough to swallow, but there are also 24 other positions," said Gibb, 31. "You can take a 25th. We were putting ourselves in a position to win the event. That's all you can ask to do, get yourself there and close out the deal. We just had a little trouble with the closing out."
MARK THOSE CALENDARS
The AVP comes to Huntington Beach May 3-6 and will make its first stop in Long Beach July 19-22.

Rogers a mental giant
The AVP MVP gets by on his brains
By Robert Falkoff
Todd Rogers isn't the tallest player on the AVP Crocs Tour. He isn't the quickest or the strongest, either.
So why is Rogers the reigning Most Valuable Player? Chalk one up for the cerebral approach of the Tour's consummate thinking man.
"I think it's an apt description that I'm a thinking man out on the volleyball court," Rogers said. "It's kind of how I was always taught when I first started playing the game. My coaches always said: 'Hey, you can go a lot further if you think it through.'"
Anticipation over sheer athleticism — it's a concept that Rogers has fully embraced.
"Fortunately, this isn't just a straight athletic game," said the 33-year-old Rogers, who has won three consecutive Best Defensive Player awards. "There's a component of intelligence and thinking about what you are doing. For me, I have a special talent where I can watch someone play and pick up on what they do well, what they do poorly or what they want to do during the game.
"In order to compete, I have to get the opponent out of their comfort zone. I'm not Mike Lambert or Phil Dalhausser, or one of these big guys who can just bring the noise every time and get away with it because of being big and strong."
The cerebral approach has indeed been a golden approach for Rogers, who teamed with Dalhausser to win eight AVP events in 2006. It's a tough act to follow, but the Rogers-Dalhausser combo will give its best shot, beginning with the season-opening event April 13-15 in Miami.
"It was a tremendous year for Phil and me as a team and for me personally," Rogers said. "We want to keep getting better as a team and as individuals. But at the same time, you have to temper the thinking a bit because we recognize that there are some very good teams out there. We'll have to play at least as good if not better to win our fair share of the tournaments this year."
When Rogers reflects on the highlights from the 2006 Tour, three tournaments come to mind. Rogers claimed the God of the Beach title in Las Vegas, celebrated victory at the tradition-rich Manhattan Beach event and got over the hump with a win in his hometown of Santa Barbara.
"I had four second-place finishes there over the last several years, so there was a lot of frustration involved in playing at home in Santa Barbara," Rogers said. "To finally win there was really gratifying. My daughter (Hannah) and wife (Melissa) came running out and gave me a big hug. It was a really special moment for me.
"Winning the God of the Beach title in Vegas shows you are a top player and Manhattan Beach is the granddaddy of them all. Certainly, I was happy to get my name up on the pier."
As they continue to build chemistry, Rogers and Dalhausser have the 2008 Beijing Olympics in mind. They could set themselves up nicely if they achieve the ambitious goal of qualifying this year.
"We'd like to take the path that Kerri (Walsh) and Misty (May-Treanor) had for the last Olympics," Rogers said. "They qualified in 2003 and then in 2004 they could kind of pick and choose which FIVB tournaments they wanted to play in. They were able to set their own course on honing their skills at the international level while limiting travel and focusing on peaking for the Olympics. Hopefully, Phil and I can be in that boat as well. But it's going to be very difficult because the level of play for the men going for the Olympics is exceptionally high."
Rogers expects there will be an added level of excitement on the Tour this year at the 11 events that Karch Kiraly will participate in as he makes his farewell appearances. Kiraly has announced this will be his last year on the Tour.
"I would imagine a lot of beach volleyball fans over the years will try to make sure they hit at least one tournament in their area," Rogers said. "I know he has touched a lot of lives. I'm sure a lot of people he played before when he was in his 20s probably have grown kids now and they'll want to go. Karch probably hears all the time from current young adults who say 'Hey, I saw you play when I was 5 years old.'"
Whether Rogers can repeat as MVP remains to be seen. But it's almost certain that nobody will out-think him.
"A lot of it stems from the fact that I love to coach," Rogers said. "I've been coaching in some form or fashion since I graduated from high school. When you watch that much volleyball, you pick up on things. I know that has been a big factor in the success that I've been able to have."

AVP Enters Into Agreement to Be Acquired by Affiliates of Shamrock Holdings
LOS ANGELES, April 5 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/ -- AVP, Inc. (OTC Bulletin
Board: AVPI) ("AVP"), a lifestyle sports entertainment company focused on
professional beach volleyball, announced today that it has entered into an
Agreement and Plan of Merger (the "Merger Agreement") with AVP Holdings,
Inc. and AVP Acquisition Corp., affiliates of Shamrock Holdings
("Shamrock"). Under the terms of the Merger Agreement, AVP Acquisition
Corp. will be merged with and into AVP, with AVP continuing as the
surviving corporation. Upon consummation of the merger, each outstanding
share of AVP common stock will be cancelled and converted into the right to
receive $1.23, and AVP will become a wholly owned subsidiary of AVP
Holdings, Inc. The total value of the transaction is approximately $36.9
million. The Company's senior management team will retain their current
positions in the surviving corporation and are expected to receive options
to purchase common stock of AVP Holdings, Inc. Immediately prior to the
merger, Leonard Armato, the chairman and chief executive officer of AVP,
will contribute to AVP Holdings, Inc. all of the shares of AVP common stock
that he owns and an additional amount of cash, in exchange for shares of
capital stock of AVP Holdings, Inc.
    The transaction, which is expected to close in the summer of 2007, is
subject to certain customary terms and conditions, including stockholder
approval, but is not subject to any financing condition. Upon completion of
this transaction, AVP will become a privately held company and its common
stock will no longer be traded on the OTC Bulletin Board.
    AVP entered into the Merger Agreement based on the unanimous
recommendation by a special committee comprised of independent directors of
AVP's board and the unanimous consent of its full board of directors.
Pursuant to the Merger Agreement, AVP has 45 days from April 5 to solicit
offers from other interested buyers.
    "We see this agreement as the right step in the evolution of the
Company," said Leonard Armato, who will continue as AVP's Chief Executive
Officer. "This transaction with Shamrock allows us to streamline our
business operation and focus AVP's precious resources on building the
business rather than public company compliance and raising capital. We are
at an inflection point in the evolution of the company and Shamrock
provides direct access to capital that will accelerate the opportunity for
AVP to grow and enable us to take the tour to the next level."
    "The Shamrock Capital Growth Fund II looks for exceptional
opportunities among domestic media, entertainment and communications
companies," stated Robert F. Perille, a Managing Director with Shamrock.
"Lifestyle-based sports entertainment is seeing unprecedented growth due to
the unique interactive experience it provides attendees, sponsors and
licensees. Leonard Armato, the AVP team and the AVP athletes have created a
unique brand and following in the marketplace. We look forward to
facilitating continued growth in beach volleyball with AVP."
    Jefferies & Co. acted as financial advisor to the special committee of
AVP's board of directors in connection with the transaction and provided an
opinion to the special committee and the board of directors of AVP that the
transaction consideration is fair to AVP stockholders from a financial
point of view.
    About Shamrock Holdings
    Shamrock Holdings, Inc., founded in 1978 by Roy E. Disney and Stanley
P. Gold, today manages approximately $2.0 billion of alternative assets on
behalf of institutional investors through five separate funds. Shamrock has
invested over $550 million in media, entertainment and communications
businesses in the United States and is currently investing through the
Shamrock Capital Growth Fund II, a $311 million private equity fund focused
on media, entertainment and communications investments.
    About AVP, Inc.
    AVP/Crocs Pro Beach Volleyball Tour, Inc. is a leading lifestyle sports
entertainment company focused on the production, marketing and distribution
of professional beach volleyball events worldwide. AVP operates the
industry's most prominent national touring series, the AVP/Crocs Pro Beach
Volleyball Tour, which was organized in 1983. Featuring more than 150 of
the top American men and women competitors in the sport, AVP is set to
stage 18 events throughout the United States in 2007. In 2004, AVP athletes
successfully represented the United States during the Olympics in Athens,
Greece, winning gold and bronze medals, the first medals won by U.S. women
in professional beach volleyball.
    All above-mentioned trademarks are the property of their respective
owners.
    Some of the information in this press release may contain projections
or other forward-looking statements regarding future events or the future
financial performance of the Company. We wish to caution you that these
statements involve risks and uncertainties and actual results might differ
materially from those in the forward-looking statements, if we receive less
sponsorship and advertising revenue than anticipated, or if attendance is
adversely affected by unfavorable weather. Event-related expenses, such as
for the stadium, transportation and accommodations, or security might be
greater than expected; or marketing or administrative costs might be
increased by our hiring, not currently planned, of a particularly qualified
prospect. Additional factors have been detailed in the Company's filings
with the Securities and Exchange Commission, including our recent filings
on Forms 10-KSB and 10-QSB.

Rogers optimistic about upcoming season
By Kristyn Peterson // usolympicteam.com // April 5, 2007
Visit USA Volleyball
Last year, Todd Rogers garnered the AVP’s most valuable player award, making him the best player in pro-beach volleyball. In addition, he’s also won the best defensive player award three years in a row. With the AVP season beginning mid-April, the 33-year-old hopes to repeat his performance and grow in the upcoming year. In addition, he hopes to better his chances of competing at the Beijing Olympic Games with teammate Phil Dalhausser.
Rogers recently took a few minutes to speak with usolympicteam.com about the upcoming season, his family and playing with Dalhausser.

Q1: What are you looking forward to in the upcoming season?
What am I looking forward to in the upcoming season? Well, let’s see. Trying to do maybe a little bit better in the international circuits. We were either really good or really bad. Being a little bit more consistent and staying up in the top in all the tournaments rather than out of the six tournaments we played in we got a first, a second and a third, and then we got a ninth, a thirteenth and a seventeenth. So we were kind of either hit or miss. Looking towards that consistency.
Just playing volleyball on the beach is something to look forward to in my opinion, as well. It’s a pretty fun sport to play. You are out on the beach in your bathing suit jumping around on the sand, so it’s pretty cool in and of itself. Just playing another season and seeing how we stack up, basically.

Q2: Have you set any specific goals for yourselves?
It’s funny you mention that. We are actually going over our goals as we speak right now. Phil just emailed me his goals. We did this last year where we just email each other back and forth our goals for the year. And we do it in three specific categories. One that we should definitely reach, shouldn’t be a problem. Two that would be tough, shouldn’t be out of the imagination and three that’s going to be really, really hard to do, that would be an amazing year kind of thing. We have set a bunch of goals. Staying in the top three or better domestically, the top five or better internationally, which goes along with looking forward to doing better on the international circuit, as well as just a bunch of other personal goals.

Q3: Where would you guys like to be in terms of development when the 2008 Olympic Games roll around?
I would say we would want to be at our peak. For me that means staying in great shape, not getting injured as I get a little bit older. I think Phil should just continue to get better with his experience and seeing all the other teams out there that we will be competing against. That will just continue to improve.
Certainly we want to be peaking. I guess we want to be the best possible place we can be. Hopefully if we are good enough this year we can qualify for the Olympics. And then therefore totally 2008 would be a focus on the Olympics. Everything, weightlifting, ply metrics, volleyball, can be focused on peaking during that month of August. That would be optimal.

Q4: You mentioned Phil’s development a little bit. You haven’t been playing together very long. What does he bring that other players you’ve played with haven’t brought to the partnership?
He just brings physical capabilities that, in my opinion, no one else in the world possesses. He’s 6’9”. He jumps very well. He moves very well for a guy his size. His hand-eye coordination is exceptional. He’s a great setter as well as a great passer. Then you just take in to account that he is 6’9” and jumps well, he can get over the net really well. His ability to take things that I tell him and learn from them very, very quickly and put them into implementation--it’s pretty amazing how quickly he’s done so at a relatively speaking younger age. He’s 26 last year, just turned 27 this year.
His growth has just been amazing. I told him last year that I thought he was at 50 percent, 60 percent of his potential. By the end of the year, I would rank that up more in the 75-80 percentile of what I think he can reach. So he still has a ways to go whereas most of the other guys that we are competing against, I think most of them have reached their potential, or close to.

Q5: You mentioned his height. How else does his style of play differ from other players you played with in the past?
We’ll I’ve never played with anyone that big. Sean Scott was always a “smaller blocker” a small 6’5”, When Dax and I played together we were always smaller, 6’3” and 6’2” so neither of us was a dominating blocker. When I played with Dax it was the old school court, the bigger court which was more jump serve and ball control. Once it changed, I needed to move on, as did he. With Sean, even now, he’s become kind of a small, small blocker--technically very good. With Phil being 6’9” and jumping well, it’s what you need in this game, and the difference is obvious, other than him being a lot younger than those guys and inexperienced. The difference is four inches, and I don’t know, he touches almost 12 feet indoor, so probably almost a foot higher in jump touch.

Q6: How do your personality and Phil’s personality match up?
We are both very mellow guys. I’m more intense than he is, particularly when we get on the court. I know he wants to win very badly and he get’s pissed at himself. Both of us tend to blame ourselves more than the other person, which I think is pretty critical for our relationship to go forward. If I give him a bad pass, he gives me a bad set and then I make an error, I’m blaming myself ‘Gosh, I gave you a bad pass, which led to you making not as good of a set as you could, I need to keep that ball in play.’ Whereas he is saying, ‘Yeah, but I have to give you a good set. I have to better the ball.’ So that  dynamic makes it a lot easier to play with one another, because you aren’t blaming the other guy, which I think destroys a lot of relationships on the court, because it’s kind of like a marriage. So that dynamic, I think is our number one attribute.
And obviously he respects me being an older player. So that kind of older-younger player mentality also helps us.

Q7: What role does your family play in your career?
As far as my actual career, not a huge role. I mean my wife certainly plays a major role in the fact that she’s a single mom for a lot of the summer. She’s pretty much every single weekend a single mom. And then when I go internationally, weeks at a time, in the past even months at a time, which is difficult on her. So in that role, she’s been fantastic. I know it’s very frustrating for her to be a single parent for those long stretches of time and get very little of a break. In that perspective, she obviously plays a role.
It’s really great that my kids are almost six and eight and they can understand where I’m going, what I’m doing, what I’m trying to accomplish. They can look on a globe and go ‘Oh, daddy’s in Austria,’ or ‘daddy’s in Chicago.’ And point on the globe and know where it is. There was a period around 5-years-old for both my kids that they really struggled. They didn’t understand why I had to travel. Sharing that with then is really fun.
So I guess in those regards that’s something that my family shares in, and it’s fun for me to share with them.

Q8: If you weren’t playing volleyball, what would you be doing?
You know, I have a real inclination to coach. I coached at UCSB for six years, from ’99-2005. Even before that, while I was in college, I was a club coach for indoor volleyball, as well as a high school and junior high coach.
So, I’ve pretty much been a coach ever since I graduated high school, which was in ’91. This is the first time I haven’t coached a specific team, although my wife and I are helping out with a local high school. And, in a way, I’m coaching Phil. Certainly, last year, I did a lot of that just because he was so raw and inexperienced in a lot of phases of the game. So, that’s what I would definitely see myself doing. Some kind of coaching.

Q9: What’s a normal day like for you?
Pretty crowded, to be honest with you, even though I have a pretty mellow job, I don’t have a 9-5er, but with the kids, I try to help out as much as I can. I get them up, get them dressed, kind of get them breakfast, and get them going. My wife usually takes my daughter to school. My son doesn’t start school until about 10:30 a.m. So I stay with him, we usually hang out for a couple hours, which is cool. As soon as I do that I’m usually going down to the beach or the weight room or the track, trying to squeeze in all of that sometimes in one day. Also deep tissue massage. And then also being on the phone, making phone calls to sponsors, potential sponsors, trying to set up practices, those kind of things. Then I get back home around 2:30 p.m. If I can I try to pick up my kids from school. They get out at 2:30 p.m. and then, my son has baseball practice once a day a week. Like I said, we are helping out with the local high school, so that’s usually almost every day, Monday through Friday. We have three dogs. We try to get them out, go for walks or runs with the dogs.  Just try to fit all that stuff here and there. My day is looking pretty busy. And I tend to cook more than my wife. A lot more than my wife, actually, so I tend to plan the dinners and whatnot.

Q10: What’s the best advice you’ve ever received?
Probably the best single advice I’ve ever received was in a class in college. I believe it was called sports management. It was from the baseball coach at UCSB. I don’t know why he decided to tell everyone this and he must have gotten it from someone else, or maybe it was from personal experience. But he said ‘Everything can be going fantastic for you, and everything can be going hunky-dory, but if you aren’t happy at home you will never be happy in life.’ And I’ve found that to be exceptionally true. When I miss my kids, or if I’m fighting with my wife, or my kids are being (difficult) or whatever, then I could have great sponsors, and I could be winning tournaments and everything could be going hunky-dory, but things just don’t… they’re a little bit sour. That probably doesn’t really have anything to do with volleyball. It has more to do with life, but I would say it’s absolutely, 100 percent true.

Q11: Who are some of your role models?
Growing up as a little kid I used to idolize Magic Johnson. I just loved the way he was unselfish and a team player. He could do everything: score, he could pass, he could rebound, and just had such a great smile, and a team player so to speak.
From a volleyball perspective, once I got into volleyball in high school, Karch Kiraly was always one of my idols. Just the way he played the game, with such intensity. He wasn’t necessarily a dynamic player, but I always thought some of that, from some guys, not all guys, was a little fake.

A new season for Wong
The former Punahou star will open the AVP competition with a new partner
By Cindy Luis
cluis@starbulletin.com
Some jobs are just better than others.
Scott Wong has one of the best.
Professional beach volleyball player.
The 28-year-old heads into the AVP season with a new partner -- former University of Hawaii player Hans Stolfus -- new life in his hitting shoulder (after rehabbing from labrum surgery) and a new training regimen.
Wong's office may be the beach, but the Association of Volleyball Professionals circuit is serious business. There are still 'B's' of the sport, but where in the old days it was Babes and Beer, now it's Big Bucks.
"Maybe hanging out and drinking beer is what guys did back then, but that's the old image," said Wong, a prep standout at Punahou and three-time All-American at Pepperdine. "Now guys work really hard and are as professional as any sport out there. You go in and treat it like a job.
"I love every aspect of my job. It's awesome. I have a good time doing it, but I take it seriously."
In doing so, Wong has altered his lifestyle, helped in part by Tactical Strength & Conditioning, a sports performance business based in Honolulu.
"They've been a tremendous tool in getting me healthy and keeping me on the right track to be in the best shape I can be," said Wong, who has been with TSC since December. "They've been a huge help in the offseason, not only rehabbing (shoulder), but in pre-habbing to prepare my body to go through the extreme elements, the playing in 100-degree weather four days in a row."
As with other endurance sports, beach volleyball players need a nutritional balance, a diet that will help build muscle without adding fat. Healthy, but not extreme.
Wong says he doesn't keep track of calories, but focuses on the timing of his food, knowing when to replenish the expended energy. It's helped him maintain the 210 to 215 pounds on his 6-foot-5 frame.
Nutrition has become even more important for the 30-year-old Stolfus, the 2005 AVP Rookie of the Year. He's had trouble keeping weight on -- he's 6-5 and 180.
"What I eat, I expend," he said. "About four years ago, I stopped eating fast food and bad carbs. My diet is high in protein, which has been tricky since I'm lactose intolerant.
"I'm trying to make my pH (balance) more alkaline base than acid base."
While many beach tandems match smaller players (good passers) with taller players (good blockers and hitters), Wong and Stolfus are taking another approach. They're close in height and will split blocking duties.
"I think that will save on expending energy by one player," Stolfus said. "We'll both take serves, we'll both be blocking. I think in the later stages of a tournament we'll have the most energy. It's a long day out there."
Hawaii alum Hans Stolfus, above, will team with Punahou grad Scott Wong.
There's been many a long day during the offseason training. Wong said his typical workout includes 3 to 3 1/2 hours during the morning on the beach, working on various aspects of the game, with specific drills for defense (digging and blocking) and offense (serving and hitting).
Afternoons might include a workout on the track or at the TSC gym.
The pair will see how the work pays off beginning this weekend when they compete in a tournament in the Dominican Republic. They're using it as a warm-up for the AVP season opener next week, the Cuervo Gold Crown Miami Open.
Wong's older brother Kevin will start the season in Miami, partnered with Karch Karalyi. This is the farewell tour for the 46-year-old Kiralyi, a three-time Olympic gold medalist (indoor and beach) who has earned more than $3 million on the sand.
"I can't wait," Kevin Wong, 34, said. "We've been working hard here. To win on tour, it's half skills, half conditioning. You have to have both or you can't get to the top."

AVP to sell to Shamrock Holdings subsidiary for $36.9M
Los Angeles Business from bizjournals - 7:09 AM PDT Friday, April 6, 2007
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AVP Inc. has agreed to be sold to AVP Acquisition Corp., a subsidiary of Burbank's Shamrock Holdings, for about $36.9 million, or $1.23 a share, the company said Thursday.
Once the merger closes, the Los Angeles-based sports entertainment company will become a wholly owned subsidiary of AVP Holdings Inc. The deal, which will take AVP private, is expected to close in the summer of 2007.
AVP's senior management team will retain their current positions, AVP said in a release, and are expected to receive options to buy AVP Holdings Inc. common stock.
Los Angeles-based AVP Inc. (OTCBB: AVPI) is a sports entertainment company that produces, markets and distributes professional beach volleyball events worldwide.

Beijing beckons former Punahou stars
By Ann Miller
Advertiser Staff Writer
It is spring 2007 and, for Stein Metzger and Mike Lambert, beach volleyball and Beijing 2008 are in the air.
The 2006 AVP Crocs Tour Team of the Year is 16 months from the 2008 Olympics, and in the midst of qualifying. The domestic season starts this week in Miami and their first international event will be in June. The two American teams with the best eight international finishes between this May and next July will play on the beach in Beijing at the 2008 Games.
Lambert and Metzger, both Punahou graduates, have been to the Games before. They want to go back.
Metzger, 34, finished fifth on the beach at Athens with Dax Holdren. The three-time UCLA All-American has been the top-ranked player on the AVP tour the past two seasons, also earning Team of the Year honors with Jake Gibb in 2005.
The 6-foot-3 former setter can play with anyone and, apparently, win with everyone. Since capturing three NCAA championships, he has collected $658,000 on the beach, with 11 AVP titles and two overseas.
"It is his competitive fire," Lambert said. "He can just turn it on and become a competitive animal and want to win more than the other guy. He's been that way since I first met him in JV and varsity and Junior Olympics. He always found a way to win."
Lambert, 32 and probably the most imposing blocker on the AVP Tour, is the more mild-mannered mauler. The three-time Stanford All-American is 6-6 and has two previous Olympic appearances indoors (1996 and 2000).
"Mike is so physical and explosive he can take over games by himself," Metzger said. "That's something any defender is drawn to. You just have to sideout and do the job on your side and you have a guy who can come out of nowhere and demolish teams."
Lots has changed. Metzger swears when Lambert was Punahou's ballboy (the year after he transferred) "he could walk under the net without bending — he was that tiny."
And, until last year, the two Buffanblu alums only dreamed of playing together on the beach. Both believed a partnership would prosper, but their timing, and a series of great partners, kept getting in the way.
When Kevin Wong — another Punahou graduate — dropped Metzger, he hooked up with Holdren out of desperation. The match worked out astonishingly well. Then, in 2004, volleyball legend Karch Kiraly asked Lambert to be his partner. They were Team of the Year, with Lambert the tour's Best Offensive Player.
In 2005, Metzger had a window of opportunity to change partners, but Kiraly asked Lambert back for his 26th season on the beach. "You don't say no to Karch," Metzger said.
But at that year's King of the Beach event — the only week where players switch partners each match — Lambert and Metzger finally had a chance to play together again. They were convinced it could work and the deal was sealed when Kiraly advised Lambert to "find a younger partner."
Metzger made the difficult decision to drop Gibb and finally pursue the dream of going for the gold with his former ballboy. "I figured if I didn't do it now it would never happen," Metzger said. "So we made the decision to finally get together and go after a medal."
After a slow start, last year blossomed into a five-win season. They reached all but one semifinal, led the money list and established themselves, along with Gibb and Sean Rosenthal, and Phil Dalhausser and Todd Rogers, as legitimate medal threats. The U.S. men were shut out in Athens.
Lambert and Metzger are so serious this year they will play 21 straight weeks, mixing domestic events with seven European stops in places as varied as Berlin, Klagenfurt (Austria), Paris and Stavanger (Norway). World Championships are in Gstaad (Switzerland) in June.
"A lot will be determined this summer," Lambert said. "We need to do well, have good results at the World Championships and Grand Slams. You could even, potentially, lock in your berth as one of the two teams that go (to the Olympics) this summer.
"We're trying to peak in July. At the same time, the AVP season is important to us too — to defend and do well and win."
The life might sound exotic, but the grind — on the sand and across the world — is debilitating. Lambert and Metzger spent the past five months working with trainers and therapists.
There will be times the next six months that they spend more time with each other than their families (Lambert and his wife had their second child in the offseason). More than anything, that might be why this team works — as Metzger knew it would, even with the laid-back, guitar-strumming Lambert as his polar-opposite partner.
"In beach volleyball, you travel so much with your partner it's nice to have that chemistry and have fun," Lambert said. "You do a lot of waiting in airports, have meals together. If you don't enjoy it, the season would seem so long. With Stein, even if there was no tour we'd still be hanging out and surfing or whatever. It makes it easier, on top of the fact we're a good team on paper."
They have been a good team everywhere else, too. What they covet most now is an opportunity to play on the beach in Beijing.
OLYMPIC NOTES
Former Rainbow Wahine Karin Lundqvist is also on a quest to play on the beach at the Olympics — for Sweden. Her partner of choice is former Hawai'i All-American Angelica Ljungquist, the 1996 National Player of the Year. Lundqvist's original partner, Sara Uddstahl, was injured last year. Lundqvist and Uddstahl were 47th in the final 2006 Beach Volleyball World Rankings. For the past three months Lundqvist has been training in Brazil, with Brazilian coach Wesely Pinheiro, while Ljungquist plays professionally indoors in Japan. Lundqvist has been invited to play in a Brazilian tournament next week. She and Ljungquist will meet back in Sweden the beginning of next month to train for two weeks before their first tournament, in Singapore.
The U.S. Olympic Committee has re-appointed Punahou graduate Chris Duplanty to his position as Liaison from the Board of Directors to the U.S. Olympic Assembly. Duplanty was a three-time water polo Olympian (1988, 1992, 1996). He lives in Newport Beach, Calif.

Americans men Stolfus and Wong won the gold 
SANTO DOMINGO, Dominican Republic, April 8, 2007.- American  men’s pair of  Scott Wong and Hans Stolfus won the gold medal of the Boca Chica Tournament, the first leg of the 2007 NORCECA Beach Volleyball Circuit, with a 21-19, 21-10 victory over Marcelo Araya and Jonathan Guevara of Costa Rica.
Cuban Yunieski Ramirez and Yoendris Kindelán won the bronze medal in defeating Jorge Bolanos and Jose Gonzalez of Guatemala by 21-9, 21-14.
“The first set shows how good the Costa Ricans are,” said Stolfus after the match. “It was a tough battle, but we were able to put together a good streak in the second set.”
And Wong added: “We lacked consistency in the first set, but the we were able to focus and that was the difference.”
The USA team made to the finals with victories over Dominican Republic III (Edward Rogers-Alejandro Flores) 21-13, 21-11 and Cuba 21-8, 21-16. Costa Rica reached the gold medal match with triumphs over El Salvador (Geovanny Medrano-David Vargas) 21-19, 21-18 and Guatemala 21-14, 21-15.
Men’s results on Sunday:
Quarterfinals: CUB d. PUR II (21-14, 21-19); USA d. DOM III (21-13, 21-11); GUA d. PUR I (21-13, 21-9); Semi finals: USA d. CUB (21-8, 21-16); CRC d. GUA (21-14, 21-15). Bronze: CUB d. GUA (21-9, 21-14). Gold: USA d. CRC (21-19, 21-10).

Volleyball Legend Karch Kiraly Signs Season Sponsorship with Herbalife
Elaine Youngs Continues for Third Season
LOS ANGELES--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Volleyball legend Karch Kiraly has signed with Herbalife Ltd. (NYSE:HLF), a global direct selling nutrition company, for a season sponsorship as the company becomes his official nutrition and energy drink sponsor. Top-ranked Elaine Youngs will continue her sponsorship for the third year.
The players will be featured in various promotions for Herbalife and its Liftoff™ brand, which is the Official Energy Drink of the AVP Volleyball Tour through 2007. Additionally, Herbalife is the Official Health and Wellness Partner as well as the Official Nutritional Advisor of the AVP Pro Beach Volleyball Tour.
Kiraly, who is often called volleyball’s “winningest” athlete, is a three-time Olympic gold medallist whose career has defined the sport of beach volleyball. He has compiled 148 career open wins and won Olympic gold medals in both indoor and beach volleyball. He will partner with Kevin Wong for the 2007 AVP Crocs Tour season.
Former Olympic bronze medallist Elaine (EY) Youngs, who ranks fourth among U.S. women in international victories, has been representing Herbalife since the 2005 season. This season, EY will compete with Nicole Branagh.
The AVP Crocs Tour kicks off April 13-15 in Miami, Fla. and culminates with the AVP Cincinnati Open Presented by Herbalife, August 31 – September 2, where the Crocs Cup champions will be crowned. Two subsequent specialty events will be held in Las Vegas and San Francisco rounding out the Tour’s 18 events for the 2007 season. The AVP Crocs Tour is a national touring series that features more than 150 of the nation’s top male and female professional beach volleyball players. Herbalife will have a presence at all AVP Crocs Tour events with guaranteed rotational signage and static center court banners. Herbalife will also receive commercial units during AVP broadcasts on NBC and Fox Sports Net. Additionally, Herbalife independent distributors will sample several of the company’s brands at all events.
About Herbalife
Herbalife Ltd. (NYSE:HLF) is a global network marketing company that sells weight-management, nutritional supplements and personal care products intended to support a healthy lifestyle. Herbalife products are sold in 64 countries through a network of more than 1.5 million independent distributors. The company supports the Herbalife Family Foundation (http://www.herbalifefamilyfoundation.org) and its Casa Herbalife program to bring good nutrition to children. Please visit Herbalife Investor Relations (http://ir.herbalife.com) for additional financial information.

Banana Boat Signs as the Official Suncare of the AVP
Agreement Creates New King of the Court Tournament and Integrates Banana
Boat Throughout the 2007 AVP Pro Beach Volleyball Tour
LOS ANGELES, April 9 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/ -- AVP, Inc. (OTC Bulletin
Board: AVPI), a lifestyle sports entertainment company focused on
professional beach volleyball, today announced it has made Banana Boat the
Official Suncare of the 2007 AVP Tour.
    Vice President of Marketing for Banana Boat Suncare, Jean Fufidio,
stated, "We are very pleased to be sponsoring the 2007 AVP Tour featuring
top volleyball athletes playing outdoors. Volleyball is an exciting and
growing sport, enjoyed by thousands of consumers. Banana Boat is a perfect
partner with volleyball because of its Sport product with patented
AvoTriplex technology that provides powerful, long-lasting UVA and UVB
protection that doesn't quit."
    Banana Boat and the AVP will create the amateur "King of the Court"
volleyball tournament, a contest open to the public and held at nine Tour
events. Promoted via radio and on-site advertising, the tournament will
allow teams of two players the chance to compete for an all expenses paid
trip to Las Vegas (Sept. 7-9) for the "King of the Court" Finals. The
finals consist of nine teams who will compete for "King of the Court"
title.
    "The AVP is synonymous with the sun and the sand, which is precisely
why it's such a unique, fun sport," said Leonard Armato, CEO and
commissioner of the AVP. "Therefore, it only seems natural that the best
sunscreen on the beach -- Banana Boat -- would partner with the AVP to
heighten the already fan-friendly experience any AVP event provides. We are
extremely excited to announce this partnership with Banana Boat as the
Official Suncare of the 2007 AVP Tour."
    About the AVP, Inc.
    AVP Pro Beach Volleyball Tour, Inc. is a leading lifestyle sports
entertainment company focused on the production, marketing and distribution
of professional beach volleyball events worldwide. AVP operates the
industry's most prominent national touring series, the AVP Pro Beach
Volleyball Tour, which was organized in 1983. Featuring more than 150 of
the top American men and women competitors in the sport, AVP is set to
stage 18 events throughout the United States in 2007. In 2004, AVP athletes
successfully represented the United States during the Olympics in Athens,
Greece, winning gold and bronze medals, the first medals won by U.S. women
in professional beach volleyball. For more information, please visit
http://www.avp.com.
    About Banana Boat(R)
    Banana Boat is a registered trademark of Sun Pharmaceuticals Corp. a
subsidiary of Playtex Products, Inc. (NYSE: PYX). Banana Boat Sun Care
helps consumers worldwide safely enjoy the sun by creating and selling a
wide variety of skin care products including sunscreen for adults, children
and babies, sunless tanning lotions for a tan without the sun year round,
after-sun products to moisturize and soothe the skin, lip balms, and other
related products. Banana Boat high SPF sun protection products are
recommended by the Skin Cancer Foundation.
    About Playtex Products, Inc.
    Playtex Products, Inc. is a leading manufacturer and distributor of a
diversified portfolio of Feminine Care, Skin Care and Infant Care products,
including Playtex tampons, Banana Boat, Wet Ones, Playtex gloves, Playtex
infant feeding products, and Diaper Genie.

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Febuary13th 2007 AVP PRO BEACH VOLLEYBALL
TOYOTA CHALLENGE Times Union Cntr Albany,NY
  




                   Times Union Center

AVP PRO BEACH VOLLEYBALL
February 13th, 2007 @ 6:30PM

COME SEE THE KINGS & QUEENS OF THE BEACH...WHEN OUR US OLYMPIC MEDALISTS BRING THEIR TALENTS TO ALBANY!

Watch as America's Best Pro Beach Volleyball Players Compete for Prize Money & the "Best of the Beach" right here in Albany, NY!

This is the 1st Indoor Pro Beach Volleyball Event - EVER! Come see over 204 tons of beach sand, catch flying t-shirts & MORE!

Come in your swim suit, Hawaiian shirts, shorts and other crazy beach wardrobe...and you might be selected for great prize giveaways!

This Event will replicate the authentic beach party atmosphere featured at outdoor AVP Tour Events (i.e. Beach Volleyball Court, Top Players, EMCEE, DJ, Video Board, Sponsor Village, etc.) and will also include beach cabanas on the arena floor & hot tubs 'n' barbeques on the concourse!

There will be participation from top ranked AVP men’s and women’s Players (including 2004 Olympic Gold Medalist Kerri Walsh, 2004 Olympic Bronze Medalist Elaine Youngs, 2005 AVP Best Defensive Player and Most Improved Player Rachel Wacholder, 2005 AVP MVP Jake Gibb, 2003 AVP Best Defensive Player Casey Jennings, 2005 AVP Most Improved Player Sean Scott, etc.).

Ticket Prices: $25.00, $20.00 & $15.00.

Students ONLY $10.00.

TICKETS ON SALE at the Times Union Center Box Office, select Price Chopper Outlets, or charge by phone at 1-800-30-EVENT.


Event Dates
2007 AVP Tour Schedule
Date Event Prize Site Tickets Info
2007 AVP Schedule
April 13 - 15--Miami, FL
April 19 - 22--Dallas, TX
May 3 - 6--Huntington Beach, CA
May 10 - 13--Glendale, AZ
May 17 - 20--Hermosa Beach, CA
May 24 - 27--Louisville, KY
May 31-Jun 3--Tampa, FL
June 14 - 17--Charleston, SC
July 5 - 8--Seaside Heights, NJ
July 19 - 22--Long Beach, CA
Aug 2 - 5--Chicago, IL
Aug 9 - 12--Manhattan Beach, CA
Aug 16 - 19--Boston, MA
Aug 23 - 26--Brooklyn, NY
Aug 30-Sept 2--Cincinnati OH
Sept 6 - 8--Las Vegas, NV
Sept 14 - 16--San Francisco, CA

AVP Announces the Premiere of Indoor Beach Volleyball in Albany, NY
January 19, 2007

Click Here To Purchase Tickets


When: Tuesday, February 13th @ 6:30pm (will end around 10pm)

Where: Times Union Center, Albany, NY

Ticket Prices: $10 - $25
(Save $2 per ticket when purchasing for a group of 20 or more. Call (518) 487-2281 to purchase Group Tickets)

AVP Pros: Kerri Walsh, Todd Rogers, Rachel Wacholder, Jake Gibb, Casey Jennings, Jenny Johnson Jordan, Sean Scott and Elaine Youngs

Format: "God & Goddess of the Beach"

Albany, NEW YORK (January 19, 2007) -- AVP, Inc. (OTC Bulletin Board: AVPI), a lifestyle sports entertainment company focused on professional beach volleyball, today announced a partnership with Times Union Center and Siena College that will bring the sport of beach volleyball indoors to the Times Union Center in Albany, NY.
"We are pleased to be partnering with AVP and Siena College to bring such an exciting event to the Capital Region," said Bob Belber, General Manager of Times Union Center. "To bring beach volleyball indoors to Albany in the wintertime, along with the star power in players such as Kerri Walsh and Todd Rogers, is a unique and exciting opportunity for everyone in the area to enjoy."
The tournament is scheduled to take place on Tuesday, Feb 13 and will feature famed AVP stars Walsh, Rogers, Casey Jennings, Jake Gibb, Elaine Youngs as well as others. Tickets go on sale Saturday, Jan 20 at 10:00 a.m. and are priced at $25, $20 and $15 for adults and $10 for students. Tickets will be available at AVP.com, the center box office, select Price Chopper stores, charge by phone at 1-800-30-event or at www.timesunion.com.
"This is an exciting event to have in the Capital Region," said John D'Argenio, Siena College Athletic Director. "The AVP is bringing gold medalist caliber play to the area, and some of the best professionals the sport has to offer. Having someone the caliber of Olympic gold medalist Kerri Walsh in the playing group raises the profile of this event significantly and we're all looking forward to some great summer fun in the middle of winter."
"We are thrilled to announce this new partnership enabling us to bring the pro beach volleyball indoors in Albany, NY, for the first time," said Leonard Armato, CEO and Tour Commissioner. "And this opportunity to bring some summer to Albany in February is a great step forward for the sport."

COME SEE THE KINGS & QUEENS OF THE BEACH...WHEN OUR US OLYMPIC MEDALISTS BRING THEIR TALENTS TO ALBANY!
Watch as America's Best Pro Beach Volleyball Players Compete for Prize Money & the "Best of the Beach" right here in Albany, NY!
This is the 1st Indoor Pro Beach Volleyball Event - EVER! Come see over 204 tons of beach sand, catch flying t-shirts & MORE!
Come in your swim suit, Hawaiian shirts, shorts and other crazy beach wardrobe...and you might be selected for great prize giveaways!
This Event will replicate the authentic beach party atmosphere featured at outdoor AVP Tour Events (i.e. Beach Volleyball Court, Top Players, EMCEE, DJ, Video Board, Sponsor Village, etc.) and will also include beach cabanas on the arena floor & hot tubs 'n' barbeques on the concourse!
There will be participation from top ranked AVP men’s and women’s Players (including 2004 Olympic Gold Medalist Kerri Walsh, 2004 Olympic Bronze Medalist Elaine Youngs, 2005 AVP Best Defensive Player and Most Improved Player Rachel Wacholder, 2005 AVP MVP Jake Gibb, 2003 AVP Best Defensive Player Casey Jennings, 2005 AVP Most Improved Player Sean Scott, etc.).
Ticket Prices: $25.00, $20.00 & $15.00.
Students ONLY $10.00.
TICKETS ON SALE at the Times Union Center Box Office, select Price Chopper Outlets, or charge by phone at 1-800-30-EVENT.
This is a CENTER STAGE setup


AVP bringing beach volleyball indoors for Albany event
1/25/2007, 3:10 p.m. ET
The Associated Press   
ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) — Beach volleyball is moving from the sea shores to the indoors for a mid-February event featuring 200 tons of sand and Olympic gold medalist Kerri Walsh, the head of the U.S. professional tour said Thursday.
"I want you to be freezing in Albany and we'll come rolling into town and bring you a little slice of beach volleyball and take you back to what it's like in the idyllic months in the summer," said Leonard Armato, chief executive and commissioner of the Los Angeles-based Association of Volleyball Professionals.
Armato said the Feb. 13 Toyota Challenge at the Times Union Center in downtown Albany will include such AVP stars as Walsh, Todd Rogers, Casey Jennings, Jake Gibb and Elaine Youngs. Walsh and partner Misty May-Treanor won the beach volleyball gold medal at the 2004 Summer Olympic Games in Athens, while Youngs and Holly McPeak took the bronze.
The Albany event will be played using a "gods and goddesses of the beach" format, in which players are paired up with different partners for each match.
Arena officials said it will take more than 30 dump truck loads of sand to replicate one of the AVP's seaside tournaments. Armato said the event, the first of its kind since he acquired the AVP seven years ago, is an opportunity to expose more people to pro beach volleyball.
"If people want to wear their summer gear under their winter coats, that's fine too, because we're going to turn the heat up," he said.
The AVP's 2007 schedule of 18 tournaments will be released in February.

Albany arena being turned into indoor beach for AVP event
ALBANY, N.Y. Not everyone can get away to a sunny beach this time of year.
So the folks who run professional beach volleyball in the United States are bringing the beach to Albany.
Crews are dumping 200 tons of sand inside the Times Union Center for tomorrow night's A-V-P Toyota Challenge.
Some of the biggest names in the sport are scheduled to play in tomorrow's two-on-two matches, including 2004 Olympic beach volleyball gold medalist Kerri Walsh.
Leonard Armato -- president of the Los Angeles-based A-V-P -- says the Albany tournament is his organization's first indoor event. He says the A-V-P tour is bring a slice of summer to Albany in mid-February as part of the effort to expose more people to the sport of pro beach volleyball.
The A-V-P's 2007 schedule of 18 tournaments starts in April and runs into September.
On the Net:
http://www.avp.com

Webcast Video:
Click Here
Watch the AVP Live on AVP.com
Tuesday, February 13 @ 6:30pm (et)
Escape the Winter Blues and Catch some AVP Action this Tuesday, February 13 at 6:30pm (ET) Live from Albany, NY on AVP.com.
Catch the Top AVP Pros including Kerri Walsh, Elaine Youngs, Rachel Wacholder, Todd Rogers and Jake Gibb as they play in a "Gods and Goddesses of the Beach" format LIVE on AVP.com.

Men's AVP Pro Beach Volleyball Toyota Challenge
February 13, 2007 Albany, New York 
Finish Player Seed
  Todd Rogers 1
  Jake Gibb 2
  Casey Jennings 3
  Sean Scott  4

Men's AVP Pro Beach Volleyball Toyota Challenge
February 13, 2007 Albany, New York 

Pool A
Round 1
Match 1: Jake Gibb (2) / Sean Scott (4) def. Casey Jennings (3) / Todd Rogers (1) 15-13 (0:14)      
Match 2: Casey Jennings (3) / Sean Scott (4) def. Jake Gibb (2) / Todd Rogers (1) 15-11 (0:13)      
Match 3: Jake Gibb (2) / Casey Jennings (3) def. Todd Rogers (1) / Sean Scott (4) 15-10 (0:12)      

Finals
Match 4: Jake Gibb (2) / Todd Rogers (1) def. Casey Jennings (3) / Sean Scott (4) 21-16 (0:20)

Men's AVP 2007 Pro Beach Volleyball Toyota Challenge Champion:


         Jake Gibb     

Women's AVP Pro Beach Volleyball Toyota Challenge
February 13, 2007 Albany, New York 
Finish Player Seed
  Kerri Walsh 1
  Rachel Wacholder 2
  Elaine Youngs 3
  Jenny Johnson Jordan 4

Women's AVP Pro Beach Volleyball Toyota Challenge
February 13, 2007 Albany, New York 

Pool A
Round 1
Match 1: Kerri Walsh (1) / Elaine Youngs (3) def. Jenny Johnson Jordan (4) / Rachel Wacholder (2) 15-10 (0:14)      
Match 2: Jenny Johnson Jordan (4) / Kerri Walsh (1) def. Rachel Wacholder (2) / Elaine Youngs (3) 15-13 (0:13)      
Match 3: Jenny Johnson Jordan (4) / Elaine Youngs (3) def. Rachel Wacholder (2) / Kerri Walsh (1) 15-13 (0:10)      

Finals
Match 4: Rachel Wacholder (2) / Kerri Walsh (1) def. Jenny Johnson Jordan (4) / Elaine Youngs (3) 21-9 (0:20)       
 
Women's AVP 2007 Pro Beach Volleyball Toyota Challenge Champion:

            Kerri Walsh

Photos:


   
Rachel Wacholder goes line over Kerri Walsh                                                           AVP  BeachVolley at the Times Union Center Albany,NY


 
Articles 2007:

Where beach meets snow
Pros play volleyball in February on sand of Times Union Center 
By DAVID FILKINS, Staff writer
First published: Wednesday, February 14, 2007
The big screen on the roof of Times Union Center said it all. Thirteen degrees. That's how cold it was Tuesday night when fans, bundled up in insulated coats, wool hats and winter boots, ambled into the arena for the most ironic of sporting events.
It's mid-February, and in these parts that means it's cold. Really cold. There are no beaches here, no sand, no boardwalk and no surfboards. Sunblock won't be in demand for months, and the nearest ocean is almost three hours away. Basketball is the spectator sport of choice right now, because it's played indoors, where you don't need animal fur or a bonfire to keep from getting frostbitten.
Sometimes, though, the rules don't apply. We go crazy. We get cabin fever. We do wacky things. We play beach volleyball in the middle of winter.
The AVP Pro Beach Volleyball Tour came to downtown Albany on Tuesday, as eight of the world's best players put on an exhibition before a crowd of 2,700. It was the first time in the tour's 24-year history a match was played inside. Good thing, considering the frigid temperature and threat of a massive snowstorm.
"I had no idea what it was going to be like," 2004 Olympic gold medalist Kerri Walsh said after winning an early match. "It feels like February. My game feels as ugly as the weather."
Walsh didn't look so ugly. She and the other three female players wore their usual bikinis; the four male players wore board shorts. They played on a regulation-size area, with the nets at their normal height -- 8 feet for men, 7 /2 feet for women. But make no mistake, this wasn't beach volleyball. The "beach" was a pile of sand surrounded by railroad ties. From the outside it looked like a giant sandbox. Plastic palm trees and strategically-placed folding chairs completed the cheesy ambience.
didn't seem to mind. They roared after every diving save or thunderous spike.
It's not often this sort of event occurs in Albany, especially during the winter. Some fans couldn't contain themselves. Canajoharie resident Mike Houghton, the girls' volleyball coach at Duanesburg High, climbed over the wall minutes before the first match, ran onto the playing surface, and asked Walsh to sign one of the two balls he had tucked under his arms. A security guard sent him back to his seat, but didn't arrest him, and Houghton returned to the stands wearing shorts, a Hawaiian shirt, and a wicker hat that had two wooden figures playing volleyball attached to the top.
What made the event enjoyable for Houghton and many others was how laid-back it was. Players signed autographs during the exhibition, took turns doing commentary for television stations, and swatted T-shirts and miniature volleyballs into the crowd. There were no hushed moments as in golf or tennis; no intense, screaming players and no timeouts. It was cool. It was fun. It was California.
After losing the first match of the night, former AVP Tour champion Sean Scott grabbed the microphone and, with a smile on his face, explained why he lost: "I got stuck in the snow," he joked.
Sounds about right.

Indoor beach volleyball event a hit with players, fans
ALBANY, N.Y. An all-too-brief slice of summer was plunked down right in the middle of Albany on a night when the thermometer was taking a dive.
The A-V-P pro beach volleyball tour held its first-ever indoor event last night at the Times Union Center. About 25-hundred fans -- some of them in Hawaiian shirts, shorts and flip-flops -- turned out on a 13-degree night to watch eight of the A-V-P's top players spike, bump and dig on the 380 tons of sand brought in for the exhibition tournament.
Kerri Walsh -- the 2004 Olympic gold medal winner in women's beach volleyball -- led a lineup of four women, while her husband Casey Jennings was among the four competitors in the men's bracket.
Walsh says she and partner Misty May-Treanor are shooting for their second gold medal in the 2008 Summer Olympics in China.
The A-V-P's 2007 season of 18 tournaments opens in April and runs through September.
On the Net: http://www.avp.com

Storm strands beach volleyball players
Exhibition match in Albany ends as snowstorm begins
ALBANY, Feb. 14
By The Associated Press
A group of professional beach volleyball players is getting a taste of winter after bringing a slice of summer to downtown Albany.
Six of eight AVP players who competed Tuesday night, plus some of the event's support staff, got stuck in Albany after their flights were canceled Wednesday because of the snowstorm.
Olympic gold medal winner Kerri Walsh is among the players who's spending an extra night in New York's state capital.
She says a couple of the other players managed to catch their flights out of Albany Wednesday morning after playing in Tuesday night's exhibition tournament at Albany's Times Union Center. The Los Angeles-based AVP's first-ever indoor event ended just a couple hours before the storm hit the area.
Walsh said the rest of the players, including her husband Casey Jennings, plan to drive to Boston Thursday to catch flights home.
Walsh says the blast of winter didn't sour the players on Albany, saying they had a "great time."

How does Rachel Wacholder spend Valentine's Day?
By Matt Zuvela
February 14, 2007
Rachel Wacholder proved that she is without question one of the best players on tour after winning five events over the past two seasons. Wacholder started the 2006 season playing with Elaine Youngs, and after a mid-season break-up, Wacholder partnered with Jen Boss. Boss and Wacholder made the final four in four of their five tournaments together. Wacholder also held the upper hand in matches against Youngs, winning all four matches against her former partner.
As the start of the 2007 season approaches, don't be surprised to see Wacholder right back at the top giving May-Treanor and Walsh a run for their money. Current rumors state that Wacholder and Boss will not play together in 2007, but rather play with new partners.
Wacholder played last night in the Toyota Challenge in Albany, NY. She partnered with Kerri Walsh in the final match and defeated Elaine Youngs and Jenny Johnson Jordan.

Valentine's Day: Special occasion, or Hallmark holiday?
It's my parent's anniversary, so it's a special day for our family. For me, though, a card is nice.

What do you like to do in the off-season to relax?
I like to see my family. My sister has twins that are eleven months old - a boy and a girl - and then she has a three year old little girl that I'm just in love with. Seeing them, to me, is the greatest thing ever.

By now, you must be training full time. What do you like to focus on during your training?
Focus on getting stronger and getting myself in the best position to maintain throughout the season, because it's a really long season. I think that's the key -- being able to make it through lots and lots of tournaments in a row.

What kind of things do you think will change for players in terms of how they train and their approach to the game as the Olympics get closer?
You really need to commit to someone -- a partner. You need to work together and set goals. It's a two year process.

Based on what you've seen overseas, what kind of team do you think will be in the gold medal match of the Olympics?
I think it's really competitive over there. A lot of it is being good teammates and knowing that there are so many good teams and anything can happen at any point. You have to stick together and work through the bad times. You have to be aggressive and confident and I think just constantly adjust to change your game. People over there have an entourage filming everything you do and breaking it down.

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April 13th-April 15th 2007 $200,000 AVP Quervo Gold Crown

Miami OPEN Bicentennial Park Miami,Fla.



IElevation.jpg


Bicentennial Park is located on beautiful Biscayne Bay, seven blocks north of Bayfront Park. Bicentennial Park is a 30-acre, open park with an event capacity of 45,000 (based on event infrastructure). Given the wide-open space, there are several different event set-ups that take place: everything from a singular stage to multiple stages to a carnival atmosphere. Some examples of event set-ups, that have taken place at Bicentennial Park, are the Lollapalooza music festival and the grand chapiteau of Cirque Du Soleil.

  AVP Tour Event Coverage AVPtourlogo6.gif

BMICHLT.gif
Event Facts
Event Start Date:Fridayday, April 13th, 2007
Prize Money:$200,000
Payout Breakdown:Mens and Womens
1) $20,000.00 2) $14,000.00 3) $8,450.00 3) $8,450.00 5) $5,000.00 5)$5,000.00
7) $3,500.00 7) $3,500.00 9) $2,200.00 9) $2,200.00 9) $2,200.00 9) $2,200.00
13) $1,400.00 13) $1,400.00 13) $1.400.00 13) $1,400.00 17) $550.00 17) $550.00
17) $550.00 17) $550.00 17) $550.00 17) $550.00 17) $550.00 17) $550.00
25) $100.00 25) $100.00 25) $100.00 25) $100.00 25) $100.00 25) $100.00
25) $100.00 25) $100.00

Starting Time:8:00 am Friday ;8:00 am Saturday; 9:00 am Sunday
4/13-15 AVP Miami Open - The first stop on the 2007 AVP Pro Beach Volleyball Tour.
Fri. 8am. Sat. 8am Sun. 9:00am Championship Match Sun.Approx. 4pm.


Hotel Info:

BISCAYNE BAY MARRIOTT HOTEL (approx. 2 miles)
1633 N BAYSHORE DR
MIAMI, FL 33132
(305) 374-3900
www.marriott.com


COURTYARD BY MARRIOTT (less than one mile)
200 SE 2 AVE
MIAMI, FL 33131
(305) 374-3000
www.miamicourtyard.com

DOUBLETREE GRAND HOTEL (approx. 2 miles)
1717 N BAYSHORE DR
MIAMI, FL 33132
(305) 372-0313
www.doubletree.com

FOUR AMBASSADORS SUITES HOTEL (approx. 2 miles)
801 BRICKELL BAY DR
MIAMI, FL 33131
(305) 371-6500
www.fourambassadors.cc

HOLIDAY INN PORT OF MIAMI-DOWNTOWN (walking distance)
340 BISCAYNE BLVD.
MIAMI, FL 33132
(305) 371-4400
www.hiportofmiami.com

HOTEL INTER-CONTINENTAL MIAMI (walking distance)
100 CHOPIN PLAZA
MIAMI, FL 33131
(305) 577-1000
www.interconti.com

HYATT REGENCY MIAMI (less than one mile)
400 SE 2 AVE
MIAMI, FL 33131
(305) 358-1234
www.hyatt.com

MANDARIN ORIENTAL HOTEL (approx. 2 miles)
500 BRICKELL KEY DR
MIAMI, FL 33131
(305) 913-8288
www.mandarinoriental.com

RADISSON HOTEL MIAMI (less than 2 miles)
1601 BISCAYNE BLVD
MIAMI, FL 33132
(305) 374-0000
www.
radisson-miami.com

                                                                                                          RIANDE CONTINENTAL BAYSIDE (walking distance)
                                                                                                                                     146 BISCAYNE BLVD
                                                                                                                                        MIAMI, FL 33132
                                                                                                                                       (305) 358-4555
                                                                                                                         www.riandecontinentalbayside.com

                                                                                                           RIVER PARK HOTEL & SUITES (less than one mile)
                                                                                                                                         100 SE 4 ST
                                                                                                                                        MIAMI, FL 33131
                                                                                                                                       (305) 374-5100                                                                                                            

                                                                                                                             www.riverparkhotelandsuites.com

Webcams:

Biscayne Bay Webcam

2007 AVP QUERVO GOLD CROWN SERIES
  MIAMI  OPEN

Schedule of Events

Register for 2007 AVP QUERVO GOLD SERIES
*Registration requires a credit card and the fee is $50.

EVENT REGISTRATION PROCEDURE AND DEADLINES: All players ranked in the Top 16 prior to an event will need to register by noon the Monday of the week preceding the Event (i.e., approximately 1-1/2 weeks before the start of the event). All other players will have until noon Monday the week of an event to register. The only valid method of entry for AVP events is online. ALL ENTRIES MUST BE RECEIVED WITH PAYMENT (VISA/MC/AMEX/DISCOVER) along with an accurate address, phone number, email address, and playing partner's name. Phone and facsimile entries will not be accepted

2007 AVP QUERVO GOLD SERIES Miami OPEN
Schedule of Events
AVP Cuervo Gold Crown Miami Open
Bicentennial Park, April 13 - April 15, 2007
Buy Tickets

BUY TICKETS NOW!
Tickets Are Now On Sale for Opening Weekend in Miami
February 26, 2007

The AVP Miami Open will take place April 13 - 15 at Bicentenial Park in Miami. More details to follow.

Click Here To Purchase Tickets
To the AVP Miami Open
April 14 & 15, 2007

April 13th is the qualifier - Admission is free

Click here to buy tickets for Louisville and Cincinnati


What:
AVP 2007 Cuervo Gold Crown Miami Open
Where:
Bicentennial Park
1075 Biscayne Blvd
Miami, FL 33132   USA

See a street map to this venue.
When:

Friday April 13th --
Qualifier
Gates Open 8am - 6pm

Saturday, April 14, 2007
Men's and Women's Main Draw Competition
Gates open at 8:30 a.m.
Competition start time 9:00 a.m.
Competition End Time (Approx) 6:00 p.m.

Sunday, April 15, 2007
Men's and Women's Main Draw Competition
Gates open at 7:30 a.m.
Competition start time 8:00 a.m.
Men's Finals 2:30 p.m.
Women's Finals 4:00 p.m.
Competition End Time (Approx) 5:30 p.m.

Tickets:

Click Here to Purchase Tickets
General Admission - $15
Courtside Seating - $35
Student/Youth General Admission - $10
Group Ticket Discounts Available
Children Under 5 are Free

Television Coverage
Check Back Soon For TV Times
Catch all the Men's and Women's 2006 AVP Finals action on FSN.
Click here to find AVP broadcast times on your local FSN provider.

Location Event Dates Network Coverage
 
Miami, FL Apr. 13 - Apr. 15 FSN
Dallas, TX Apr. 19 - Apr. 22 FSN
Huntington Beach, CA May 3 - May 6 FSN
Glendale, AZ May 10 - May 13 FSN
Hermosa Beach, CA May 17 - May 20 FSN
Louisville, KY May 24 - May 27 FSN
Tampa, FL May 31 - Jun. 3 FSN
Atlanta, GA Jun. 7 - Jun. 10 FSN
Charleston, SC Jun. 14 - Jun. 17 FSN
Seaside Heights, NJ Jul. 5 - Jul. 8 FSN
Long Beach, CA Jul. 19 - Jul. 22 NBC and FSN
Chicago, IL Aug. 2 - Aug. 5 NBC and FSN
Manhattan Beach, CA Aug. 9 - Aug. 12 NBC and FSN
Boston, MA Aug. 16 - Aug. 19 NBC and FSN
Brooklyn, NY Aug. 23 - Aug. 26 NBC and FSN
Cincinnati, OH Aug. 30 - Sept. 2 FSN
Las Vegas, NV Sept. 6 - Sept. 8 FSN
San Francisco, CA Sept. 14 - Sept. 16 FSN

*All air times are regional. Please check local listings for viewing times.

AVP Miami Open History
2005 Champions: Misty May-Treanor and Kerri Walsh defeated Rachel Wacholder and Elaine Youngs. Stein Metzger and Jake Gibb defeated Jeff Nygaard and Dax Holdren.
Fort Lauderdale Facts: Opening Day will take place in Fort Lauderdale for the fourth consecutive year. Misty May-Treanor / Kerri Walsh are the three time defending champions having only dropped one game in their Fort Lauderdale playing history. The Men have only had one repeat winner in Fort Lauderdale history as John Hanley / John Stevenson won the first two Fort Lauderdale Opens in 1984 and 1985. Linda Hanley / Nina Matthies won the inagural Women's Fort Lauderdale Open in 1986.
 
Maps and Parking:
See a street map to this venue.
 
AVP Site address:
Bicentennial Park
1075 Biscayne Blvd
Miami, FL 33132   USA

Parking Locations:

Volunteer:

Sign up to volunteer at the AVP Cuervo Gold Crown Miami Open. From ballshaggers to scorekeepers to tent personnel, we need them all! All volunteers receive an AVP t-shirt and visor. We accept volunteers of ages 12 and up (or 8 and up with a parent)! Parents, we would love to have you too!

Download Registration Form to Sign Up!
•  Miami Volunteer Form
   [Microsoft Word Document]

Youth Clinics:

Hilton AVP Youth Indoor to Outdoor Transition Clinics are for all volleyball players between the ages of 12-18. Clinics are held onsite at AVP events and are free.

Download Registration Form to Sign Up!
•  Miami Youth Clinic Form
   [Microsoft Word Document]

Event Information:

Main Draw
•  24 Teams, 8 Courts
•  18 automatic entries, 2 wildcards

Qualifier
•  40 Men's and Women's teams
•  4 teams advance via Qualifier

Finals
•  MEN: 2:30 p.m. on Sunday 4/15
•  WOMEN: 4:00 p.m. on Sunday 4/15

* Event Registration Coming Soon!

Tickets For All Events
AVP BEACH CLUB

Join the most unforgettable beach party and sit courtside as the nation's hottest pro beach superstars battle for number one!
An entire weekend packed with hot volleyball action, food and fun--all for only $100
 
Member Benefits
Become an exclusive member of the AVP Beach Club and receive:
-best seats on the beach, Saturday and Sunday
-superb hospitality in the AVP Beach Club
-food and beverage
-limited edition commemorative t-shirt
-laminated credential for exclusive access
-rights to purchase valet parking
-priority for renewal
-and much, much, more!!!
Membership is only $100
Space is limited so Sign Up Online Now or Call AVP Beach Club Hotline (310) 426-7171
 
Event Dates
2007 AVP Tour Schedule
Date Event Prize Site Tickets Info
2007 AVP Schedule
April 13 - 15--Miami, FL
April 19 - 22--Dallas, TX
May 3 - 6--Huntington Beach, CA
May 10 - 13--Glendale, AZ
May 17 - 20--Hermosa Beach, CA
May 24 - 27--Louisville, KY
May 31-Jun 3--Tampa, FL
June 14 - 17--Charleston, SC
July 5 - 8--Seaside Heights, NJ
July 19 - 22--Long Beach, CA
Aug 2 - 5--Chicago, IL
Aug 9 - 12--Manhattan Beach, CA
Aug 16 - 19--Boston, MA
Aug 23 - 26--Brooklyn, NY
Aug 30-Sept 2--Cincinnati OH
Sept 6 - 8--Las Vegas, NV
Sept 14 - 16--San Francisco, CA
  
How To Get There :

Directions
From the North:
I-95 South to Exit 2D (you will exit from the left lane)
Take N.E 2nd Avenue exit - EXIT 2B
Take N.E. 2nd to N.E. 10th Street
Turn Left onto N.E. 10th Street
Turn Right on Biscayne Boulevard
The entrance is on the left at N.E. 9th Street

From Eastbound on SR 836 (Dolphin Expressway):
At the end of the Freeway, continue East onto I-395
Take N.E 2nd Avenue exit - EXIT 2B
Take N.E. 2nd to N.E. 10th Street
Turn Left onto N.E. 10th Street
Turn Right on Biscayne Boulevard
The entrance is on the left at N.E. 9th Street

From the South:
I-95 North to Exit 2D
Take N.E 2nd Avenue exit - EXIT 2B
Take N.E. 2nd to N.E. 10th Street
Turn Left onto N.E. 10th Street
Turn Right on Biscayne Boulevard
The entrance is on the left at N.E. 9th Street

From Westbound MacArthur Cswy (I-395):
Exit Biscayne Boulevard
Turn left onto Biscayne Blvd. and continue for 2/10 of a mile
The entrance is on the left at N.E. 9th Street.

Sponsor Activities



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Be a part of the Bud Light Party Zone.  Look for Bud Light onsite to find out more information.


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The Aquafina Purity Patrol is coming to the beach with tons of fun activities in the sun.  Compete in the the Aquafina Obstacle Course, Aquafina/ Wilson Speed Serve/ and "Return to Aquafina" hitting challenges.  See how you stand up against AVP Pros and your friends and win cool prizes.


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Visit Xbox at the beach and challenge your friends in the latest and greatest Xbox Game titles.  You can be King and sit in Xbox's "King of the Court" seats, the hottest seats on stadium court all weekend long or for the Men's and Women's finals.  You'll be front row in your Xbox visor, t-shirt, tattoo and much more watching the pro beach stars battle for number one.   

                                                           
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Stop by on Saturday for samples and give-aways.  On Sunday, come by for $10 Cut-a-thon and get your hair cut and styled by one of Paul Mitchell's talented stylists.  Profits go to Eric Fonoimoana's "Dig For Kids" Foundation.  You'll walk around the beach looking fantastic, and for a good cause.

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Look for the Gatorade at all AVP events!

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Wilson the official volleyball of the AVP!

Event Links:                                                                      
                                                                                             
  2007 AVP Tour Event Coverage AVPtourlogo6.gif

(Format: Double Elimination)

*IAN CLARK WILLNOT BE  PLAYING THIS YEAR'S  2007 AVP MIAMI OPEN DUE TO PRIOR COMMITMENTS


*IAN CLARK'S RESULTS FROM THE PAST 2004 FT.LAUDERDALE OPEN

13th - Ian Clark/Eli Fairfield             $1,050

2004 AVP Pro Beach Tour
Date Tournament Partner Seed Finish Winnings
4/2-4 Fort Lauderdale Open Ian Clark/Eli Fairfield 16thSeed Finish 13th Winnings $525 (ea)
Ian Clark/Eli Fairfield     d. Matt Heath/Adam Roberts  21-18, 16-21, 18-16 (50)  
Ian Clark/Eli Fairfield     l. Canyon Ceman/Mike Whitmarsh  21-19, 15-21, 11-15 (47)  
Ian Clark/Eli Fairfield     d. Scott Hill/Dan Mintz  21-16, 21-12 (38)  
Ian Clark/Eli Fairfield     l. Brent Doble/Jose Loiola  17-21, 13-21 (42)
 
Season Stats Matches Won-Lost:  2-2 Points Scored-Allowed:  174-180

-With (2 wins/2 losses) Ian Clark/Eli Fairfield finish 13th at the 2004 AVP Paul Mitchell Ft Lauderdale Open

(AVP MIAMI REGISTRATION HAS STARTED)

AVP Miami Player Info
Pertinent information for prospective players
AVP CUERVO GOLD CROWN MIAMI OPEN
Bicentennial Park
1075 Biscayne Blvd
Miami, FL 33132

4/13 Friday Qualifier
8:00 a.m. to approx. 6:00 p.m.
8 Courts/40 team cap/gender

4/14 Saturday Main Draw
8 Courts
Men and Women Main Draw Competition 8:00 a.m.-6:00 p.m.
24 Team Draw

4/15 Sunday Main Draw
8 Courts
Men and Women Main Draw Competition 8:00 a.m.-5:30 p.m.
Men's Finals 2:30 p.m.
Women's Finals 4:00 p.m.

Registration Information

AVP WILL DO ITS BEST TO ACCOMMODATE ALL TEAMS THAT SIGN UP FOR THE QUALIFICATION TOURNAMENT. IN THE EVENT THAT THE QUALIFICATION TOURNAMENT WILL NEED TO BE CAPPED DUE TO A LIMITED NUMBER OF COURTS, TEAMS WILL BE GRANTED ENTRY INTO THE QUALIFIER BASED ON THEIR AVP ENTRY POINT RANKING.

DUE TO THE FACT THAT THE SIZE OF THE QUALIFIER WILL BE LIMITED, ALL REGISTRATION IS PENDING UNTIL THE WEEK OF THE TOURNAMENT. WE CANNOT PREDICT THE NUMBER OF TEAMS THAT WILL REGISTER; THEREFORE WE CANNOT PREDICT WHAT THE POINTS REQUIREMENT WILL BE TO GUARANTEE A SPOT IN THE QUALIFIER.

As a result, until the final qualification bracket is released the week of the Tournament (no later than Wednesday at 5:00pm PST) all entries into the tournament are pending. All teams who are not able to compete due to draw limitations will have their entry fees refunded.

The only valid method of entry for AVP events is online at www.avp.com. ALL ENTRIES MUST BE RECEIVED WITH PAYMENT (VISA/MC/AMEX/DISCOVER) along with an accurate address, phone number, email address, and playing partner's name. Any player who does not have access to a computer or the internet may register in person at the AVP offices. Phone and facsimile entries will not be accepted.

NO ENTRY FEES SHALL BE REFUNDED IN THE EVENT OF A WITHDRAWAL, APPROVED OR OTHERWISE.

For venues outside of Southern California, Qualifier Check-In will be now take place the night before the qualifier.

Registration Deadlines

All players ranked in the Top 16 prior to an event will need to register by midnight the Monday of the week preceding the Event (i.e., approximately 1-1/2 weeks before the start of the event). All other players will have until noon Monday the week of an event to register. For events that occur on consecutive weeks, players ranked in the Top 16 will have until noon Monday the week of an event to register. All entries and fees are due by these registration deadlines. Any changes to these deadlines will be sent via email to players or posted online. Late entries will NOT be accepted. ENTRIES BY PHONE OR FACSIMILE WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED. It is the player's responsibility to check the player section of the AVP website to check for changes in registration deadline.

In the event that AVP allows a late registration in its sole discretion, a fee will be levied for late registration and will increase with each offense. The late fee for the first offense will be $100 and will double upon each subsequent occurrence. AVP RESERVES THE RIGHT TO NOT ACCEPT A LATE REGISTRATION.
 
AVP Tour Event Top 16 Deadline Qualifier Deadline
Miami 4/9/2007 4/9/2007
Dallas 4/16/2007 4/16/2007
Huntington Beach 4/23/2007 4/30/2007
Glendale 5/7/2007 5/7/2007
Hermosa Beach 5/14/2007 5/14/2007
Louisville 5/21/2007 5/21/2007
Tampa 5/28/2007 5/28/2007
Atlanta 6/4/2007 6/4/2007
Charleston 6/11/2007 6/11/2007
Seaside Heights 6/25/2007 7/2/2007
Long Beach 7/9/2007 7/16/2007
Chicago 7/23/2007 7/30/2007
Manhattan Beach 8/6/2007 8/6/2007
Boston 8/13/2007 8/13/2007
Brooklyn 8/20/2007 8/20/2007
Cincinnati 8/27/2007 8/27/2007
 
Miami Qualifier Check-in

Thursday, 4/12 6:30-8:00pm
Hilton Miami Airport, The Club Mystique Room
5101 Blue Lagoon
Miami, FL 33126

ALL players must check in at this time. Players must bring a form of identification (e.g., Driver's License). If you do not check at registration, you will forfeit your first game. Competition play will start at 8:00 AM. If you have any questions, please e-mail AVP at playerinfo@avp.com.

ALL players who qualify for the main draw MUST sign the AVP Player Agreement. Players who do not sign the agreement prior to start of the main draw will be unable to participate and will be ineligible for future AVP competition.

APPAREL GUIDELINES: All qualifier participants must be in matching apparel. Specifically, all playing partners are required to wear the same color swimwear. This means the same color shorts for the men and the same color suits for the women. The apparel can be different in design and can be from any manufacturer but MUST be the same color. Please remember in the case of patterned swimwear, all colors in the pattern must match your partner. Players who DO NOT adhere to this guideline WILL FORFEIT their match.

Registration for the AVP Miami Open begins on Thursday, April 5, at 3:00 p.m. ET
Entry Points for the AVP Miami Open

2007 Men's $200,000 AVP Cuervo Gold Crown Miami Open
April 13th-April 15th, 2006 


Men's Qualifier Entries:

Albert Hannemann, Torrance, Calif. / Ed Ratledge, Huntington Beach, Calif.
Jeff Carlucci, Huntington Beach, Calif. / Adam Roberts, Myrtle Beach, S.C.
Mike DiPierro, Pompano Beach, Fla. / Ran Kumgisky, Santa Monica, Calif.
Mike Morrison, San Diego / Ty Tramblie, Newport Beach, Calif.
Ben Koski, Santa Barbara, Calif. / Jeff Minc, Santa Barbara, Calif.
David Fischer, Venice, Calif. / Scott Hill, Los Angeles
Billy Allen, Fallbrook, Calif. / AJ Mihalic, Hermosa Beach, Calif.
John Moran, Redondo Beach, Calif. / Brad Torsone, Redondo Beach, Calif.
Kevin Dake, Oceanside, Calif. / Lucas Wisniakowski, El Segundo, Calif.
Jon Mesko, Manhattan Beach, Calif. / Leonardo Moraes, San Diego
Chad Mowrey, Hermosa Beach, Calif. / Kimo Tuyay, Hermosa Beach, Calif.
Jim Nichols, Encinitas, Calif. / Jon Stalls, San Marcos, Calif.
Chris Harger, Thousand Oaks, Calif. / Justin Phipps, Dunedin, Fla.
Russ Marchewka, Costa Mesa, Calif. / Fernando Sabla, Costa Mesa, Calif.
Dana Camacho, Pacific Palisades, Calif. / Pete DiVenere, Pawleys Island, S.C.
Jim Van Zwieten, Pompano Beach, Fla. / Steve Van Zwieten, Pompano Beach, Fla.
Everett Matthews, Burbank, Calif. / Ivan Mercer, Manhattan Beach, Calif.
Matt Ogin, Turnersville, N.J. / Todd Strassberger, Sewell, N.J.
Erik Gomez, Pasadena, Texas / John Michelau, San Diego
Gaston Macau, Miami, FL/ Rony Seikaly, Miami, FL
David DiPierro, Pompano Beach, Fla. / Matt Heagy, Hermosa Beach, Calif.
Ihor Akinshyn, Mahwah, N.J. / Tim McNichol, New York City
Danko Iordanov, Lakewood, Calif. / Monty Tucker, Cerritos, Calif.
Yariv Lerner, Venice, Calif. / Rob McNaughton, Santa Monica, Calif.
Shane Nelson, Chandler, Ariz. / Vince Zanzucchi, Chandler, Ariz.
Matt Davis, Burke, Va. / Jon Mackey, Myrtle Beach, S.C.
Craig Cromwell, Chesterton, Ind. / Wayne Holly, Ft. Lauderdale, Fla.
Jeff Murrell, Santa Barbara, Calif. / Soeren Schneider, Fullerton, Calif.
William Chenoweth, Orlando / Guy Hamilton, Hermosa Beach, Calif.
Nate Hagstrom, Fountain Valley, Calif. / Ed Lunnen, Huntington Beach, Calif.
Keawe Adolpho, Coconut Creek, Fla. / Mark Van Zwieten, Pompano Beach, Fla.
Tim Church, Springfield, Mass. / Ryan Cronin, Hermosa Beach, Calif.
Joe Cash, St. Petersburg, Fla. / Matt Osburn, San Diego
Jake Blair, San Diego / Erik Laverdiere, Warwick, R.I.
Bobby Jones, Beverly Hills, Calif. / Andrew Mack, Las Vegas
Drew Brand, Torrance, Calif. / Jesse Rambis, Manhattan Beach, Calif.
Michael Bleech, Redondo Beach, Calif. / Vince Fierro, Redondo Beach, Calif.
Jack Delehanty, Fall River, Mass. / Phil St. Pierre, Feeding Hills, Mass.
Tony Epie, Miami / Ben Parker, Centerville, Ohio
Tim Ryan, Studio City, Calif. / Travis Schoonover, Moorpark, Calif.
Tyler Lesneski / Jeff Soler, Ozona, Fla.
David Holewinski, Clearwater, Fla. / Jon Sundquist, Safety Harbor, Fla.
Scott Provencher, Fort Myers, Fla. / Garrett Rasmussen, Fort Myers, Fla.
Kevin Craig, Deerfield Beach / Eric Wurts, Ft. Lauderdale, Fla.
Joel Keates / Jay Reynolds, Fullerton, Calif.
Oguz Degirmenci, Durham, N.C. / Matthew Hunter, Dunedin, Fla.
Craig Demott, Miami Beach, Fla. / Dameon Holmquist, Miami Beach, Fla.
Teddy Cook, Ft. Lauderdale, Fla. / Andreas Olesen
Jerod Davis, Deerfield Beach, Fla. / Andre Melo, Deerfield Beach, Fla.
Donny Bass, Fort Myers, Fla. / Eric Leeseberg, Bonita Springs, Fla.

Men's $100,000 AVP Cuervo Gold Crown Miami Open
April 13-15, 2007 

Qualifier Bracket
Round 1
Match 2: Tim Church / Ryan Cronin (Q32) def. Joe Cash / Matt Osburn (Q33) 20-22, 21-19, 15-9 (1:04)
Match 3: Kevin Craig / Eric Wurts (Q48) def. Everett Matthews / Ivan Mercer (Q17) 14-21, 21-18, 15-7 (1:02)
Match 4: Jim Van Zwieten / Steve Van Zwieten (Q16) def. Teddy Cook / Andreas Olesen (Q49) 21-13, 21-15 (0:41)
Match 6: Tyler Lesneski / Jeff Soler (Q41) def. Yariv Lerner / Rob McNaughton (Q24) 21-18, 21-14 (0:42)
Match 7: Tim Ryan / Travis Schoonover (Q40) def. Shane Nelson / Vince Zanzucchi (Q25) 17-21, 21-19, 15-12 (1:07)
Match 10: Jeff Murrell / Soeren Schneider (Q28) def. Michael Bleech / Vince Fierro (Q37) 21-11, 21-17 (0:38)
Match 11: David DiPierro / Matt Heagy (Q21) def. Oguz Degirmenci / Matthew Hunter (Q44) 21-11, 21-18 (0:41)
Match 14: Craig Demott / Dameon Holmquist (Q45) def. Gaston Macau / Rony Seikaly (Q20) 21-8, 21-18 (0:37)
Match 15: William Chenoweth / Guy Hamilton (Q29) def. Drew Brand / Jesse Rambis (Q36) 21-16, 21-14 (0:42)
Match 18: Nate Hagstrom / Ed Lunnen (Q30) def. Bobby Jones / Andrew Mack (Q35) 21-7, 21-15 (0:40)
Match 19: Jerod Davis / Andre Melo (Q46) def. Erik Gomez / John Michelau (Q19) 22-20, 21-15 (0:45)
Match 22: Ihor Akinshyn / Tim McNichol (Q22) def. Scott Provencher / Garrett Rasmussen (Q43) 21-16, 21-14 (0:47)
Match 23: Jack Delehanty / Phil St. Pierre (Q38) def. Craig Cromwell / Wayne Holly (Q27) 21-15, 21-19 (0:47)
Match 26: Matt Davis / Jon Mackey (Q26) def. Tony Epie / Ben Parker (Q39) 21-23, 21-14, 15-12 (1:01)
Match 27: Danko Iordanov / Monte Tucker (Q23) def. David Holewinski / Jon Sundquist (Q42) 21-11, 21-9 (0:47)
Match 30: Matt Ogin / Todd Strassberger (Q18) def. Donny Bass / Eric Leeseberg (Q47) 18-21, 24-22, 15-6 (1:05)
Match 31: Keawe Adolpho / Mark Van Zwieten (Q31) def. Jake Blair / Erik Laverdiere (Q34) 21-14, 21-12 (0:38)

Round 2
Match 33: Albert Hannemann / Ed Ratledge (20, Q1) def. Tim Church / Ryan Cronin (Q32) 21-11, 21-14 (0:39)
Match 34: Jim Van Zwieten / Steve Van Zwieten (Q16) def. Kevin Craig / Eric Wurts (Q48) 21-13, 21-15 (0:39)
Match 35: Tyler Lesneski / Jeff Soler (Q41) def. Kevin Dake / Lucas Wisniakowski (Q9) 21-18, 21-16 (0:47)
Match 36: John Moran / Brad Torsone (Q8) def. Tim Ryan / Travis Schoonover (Q40) 21-15, 21-23, 15-13 (1:16)
Match 37: Ben Koski / Jeff Minc (Q5) def. Jeff Murrell / Soeren Schneider (Q28) 22-20, 21-17 (0:52)
Match 38: Jim Nichols / Jon Stalls (Q12) def. David DiPierro / Matt Heagy (Q21) 21-15, 21-17 (0:38)
Match 39: Chris Harger / Justin Phipps (Q13) def. Craig Demott / Dameon Holmquist (Q45) 21-10, 21-18 (0:50)
Match 40: Mike Morrison / Ty Tramblie (23, Q4) def. William Chenoweth / Guy Hamilton (Q29) 21-14, 21-16 (0:45)
Match 41: Mike DiPierro / Ran Kumgisky (21, Q3) def. Nate Hagstrom / Ed Lunnen (Q30) 21-13, 21-12 (0:35)
Match 42: Jerod Davis / Andre Melo (Q46) def. Russ Marchewka / Fernando Sabla (Q14) 21-15, 21-19 (0:45)
Match 43: Chad Mowrey / Kimo Tuyay (Q11) def. Ihor Akinshyn / Tim McNichol (Q22) 21-19, 21-19 (0:50)
Match 44: David Fischer / Scott Hill (Q6) def. Jack Delehanty / Phil St. Pierre (Q38) 21-12, 21-18 (0:44)
Match 45: Billy Allen / AJ Mihalic (24, Q7) def. Matt Davis / Jon Mackey (Q26) 21-17, 21-15 (0:40)
Match 46: Danko Iordanov / Monte Tucker (Q23) def. Jon Mesko / Leonardo Moraes (Q10) 21-12, 19-21, 15-13 (0:50)
Match 47: Dana Camacho / Pete DiVenere (Q15) def. Matt Ogin / Todd Strassberger (Q18) 21-12, 21-17 (0:38)
Match 48: Keawe Adolpho / Mark Van Zwieten (Q31) def. Jeff Carlucci / Adam Roberts (Q2) 21-15, 21-16 (0:45)

Round 3
Match 49: Albert Hannemann / Ed Ratledge (20, Q1) def. Jim Van Zwieten / Steve Van Zwieten (Q16) 21-17, 21-12 (0:30)
Match 50: John Moran / Brad Torsone (Q8) def. Tyler Lesneski / Jeff Soler (Q41) 19-21, 21-18, 15-11 (1:14)
Match 51: Ben Koski / Jeff Minc (Q5) def. Jim Nichols / Jon Stalls (Q12) 22-20, 21-16 (0:47)
Match 52: Mike Morrison / Ty Tramblie (23, Q4) def. Chris Harger / Justin Phipps (Q13) 21-18, 22-20 (0:48)
Match 53: Mike DiPierro / Ran Kumgisky (21, Q3) def. Jerod Davis / Andre Melo (Q46) 21-18, 21-12 (0:43)
Match 54: David Fischer / Scott Hill (Q6) def. Chad Mowrey / Kimo Tuyay (Q11) 21-13, 21-10 (0:37)
Match 55: Billy Allen / AJ Mihalic (24, Q7) def. Danko Iordanov / Monte Tucker (Q23) 18-21, 21-18, 16-14 (1:01)
Match 56: Keawe Adolpho / Mark Van Zwieten (Q31) def. Dana Camacho / Pete DiVenere (Q15) 21-18, 18-21, 15-8 (1:04)

Round 4
Match 57: Albert Hannemann / Ed Ratledge (20, Q1) def. John Moran / Brad Torsone (Q8) 21-19, 21-17 (0:51)
Match 58: Mike Morrison / Ty Tramblie (23, Q4) def. Ben Koski / Jeff Minc (Q5) 22-20, 21-18 (0:52)
Match 59: Mike DiPierro / Ran Kumgisky (21, Q3) def. David Fischer / Scott Hill (Q6) 21-17, 21-13 (0:44)
Match 60: Billy Allen / AJ Mihalic (24, Q7) def. Keawe Adolpho / Mark Van Zwieten (Q31) 18-21, 25-23, 15-11 (0:54)

Men's $100,000 AVP Cuervo Gold Crown Miami Open
April 13-15, 2007 Seedings

Seed    Player                  Points            Partner                   Points            Total
1       1 Mike Lambert          1303             1 Stein Metzger            1303             2606
2       3 Phil Dalhausser        1264             3 Todd Rogers              1264             2528
3       5 Jake Gibb                 1013             5 Sean Rosenthal           1013             2026
4       8 Sean Scott                 880               9 Matt Fuerbringer        864               1744
5       7 Dax Holdren             932               11 Jeff Nygaard              802               1734
6       13 Anthony Medel      700               13 Fred Souza                 700               1400
7       11 John Hyden            802               41 George Roumain       326               1128
8       9 Casey Jennings        864               Mark Williams               248               1112
9       24 Kevin Wong           488               25 Karch Kiraly              484               972
10      21 Ryan Mariano       490               26 Larry Witt                 480               970
11      21 Scott Wong           490               27 Hans Stolfus               474               964
12      18 Canyon Ceman     558               31 Paul Baxter                404               962
13      18 Matt Olson           558               31 Jason Ring                 404               962
14      20 Eric Fonoimoana  500               29 Chad Turner               443               943
15      21 Brent Doble          490               30 Ty Loomis                  436               926
16      15 Nick Lucena          682               Will Strickland               175               857
17      17 Adam Jewell          636               Jose Loiola                    195               831
18      33 Brad Keenan          402               33 John Mayer             402               804
19      27 Aaron Wachtfogel  474               Austin Rester               272               746
20      35 Albert Hannemann 384               42 Ed Ratledge            324               708
21      37 Jeff Carlucci           350               37 Adam Roberts         350               700
23      39 Dain Blanton          342               Scott Lane                    280               622

Men's $100,000 AVP Cuervo Gold Crown Miami Open
April 13-15, 2007

Featured Players:

Men's Main Draw Entries:
Mike Lambert, Costa Mesa, Calif. / Stein Metzger, Manhattan Beach, Calif. (1)
Phil Dalhausser, Santa Barbara, Calif. / Todd Rogers, Solvang, Calif. (2)

Jake Gibb, Costa Mesa, Calif. / Sean Rosenthal, Manhattan Beach, Calif. (3)
Matt Fuerbringer, Redondo Beach, Calif. / Sean Scott, Redondo Beach, Calif. (4)
Dax Holdren, Goleta, Calif. / Jeff Nygaard, Long Beach, Calif. (5)
Anthony Medel, Costa Mesa, Calif. / Fred Souza, Venice, Calif. (6)
Casey Jennings, Redondo Beach, Calif. / Mark Williams, Pasadena, Calif. (7)
John Hyden, Sherman Oaks, Calif. / George Roumain, Calabasas, Calif. (8)
Hans Stolfus, San Diego / Scott Wong, Venice, Calif. (9)
Karch Kiraly, San Clemente, Calif. / Kevin Wong, Honolulu (10)
Ryan Mariano, Lake Forest, Calif. / Larry Witt, Santa Ynez, Calif. (11)
Paul Baxter, Venice, Calif. / Canyon Ceman, Los Angeles (12)
Matt Olson, Cardiff, Calif. / Jason Ring, Venice, Calif. (13)
Brent Doble, San Juan Capistrano, Calif. / Ty Loomis, Newport Beach, Calif. (14)
Nick Lucena, Davie, Fla. / Will Strickland, Manhattan Beach, Calif. (15)
Brad Keenan, Santa Ana, Calif. / John Mayer, Thousand Oaks, Calif. (16)
Austin Rester, Venice, Calif. / Aaron Wachtfogel, Hermosa Beach, Calif. (17)
Dain Blanton, Santa Monica, Calif. / Scott Lane, Redondo Beach, Calif. (TBD)
Eric Fonoimoana, Hermosa Beach, Calif. / Chad Turner, Fort Myers Beach, Fla. (TBD)
Adam Jewell, Redondo Beach, Calif. / Jose Loiola, Manhattan Beach, Calif. (TBD)

*Ian Clark will not be attending the Miami event due to a prior comittment 

Men's $100,000 AVP Cuervo Gold Crown Miami Open
April 13-15, 2007 
Finish Player Partner Seed  
  Mike Lambert Stein Metzger 1  
  Phil Dalhausser Todd Rogers 2  
  Jake Gibb Sean Rosenthal 3  
  Matt Fuerbringer Sean Scott 4  
  Dax Holdren Jeff Nygaard 5  
  Anthony Medel Fred Souza 6  
  Casey Jennings Mark Williams 7  
  John Hyden George Roumain 8  
  Hans Stolfus Scott Wong 9  
  Karch Kiraly Kevin Wong 10  
  Ryan Mariano Larry Witt 11  
  Paul Baxter Canyon Ceman 12  
  Matt Olson Jason Ring 13  
  Eric Fonoimoana Chad Turner 14  
  Brent Doble Ty Loomis 15  
  Nick Lucena Will Strickland 16  
  Brad Keenan John Mayer 17  
  Austin Rester Aaron Wachtfogel 18  
  Adam Jewell Jose Loiola 19  
  Albert Hannemann Ed Ratledge Q1  
  Jeff Carlucci Adam Roberts Q2  
  Mike DiPierro Ran Kumgisky Q3  
  Mike Morrison Ty Tramblie Q4  
  Ben Koski Jeff Minc Q5  
  David Fischer Scott Hill Q6  
  Billy Allen AJ Mihalic Q7  
  John Moran Brad Torsone Q8  
  Kevin Dake Lucas Wisniakowski Q9  
  Jon Mesko Leonardo Moraes Q10  
  Chad Mowrey Kimo Tuyay Q11  
  Jim Nichols Jon Stalls Q12  
  Chris Harger Justin Phipps Q13  
  Russ Marchewka Fernando Sabla Q14  
  Dana Camacho Pete DiVenere Q15  
  Jim Van Zwieten Steve Van Zwieten Q16  
  Everett Matthews Ivan Mercer Q17  
  Matt Ogin Todd Strassberger Q18  
  Erik Gomez John Michelau Q19  
  Gaston Macau Rony Seikaly Q20  
  David DiPierro Matt Heagy Q21  
  Ihor Akinshyn Tim McNichol Q22  
  Danko Iordanov Monte Tucker Q23  
  Yariv Lerner Rob McNaughton Q24  
  Shane Nelson Vince Zanzucchi Q25  
  Matt Davis Jon Mackey Q26  
  Craig Cromwell Wayne Holly Q27  
  Jeff Murrell Soeren Schneider Q28  
  William Chenoweth Guy Hamilton Q29  
  Nate Hagstrom Ed Lunnen Q30  
  Keawe Adolpho Mark Van Zwieten Q31  
  Tim Church Ryan Cronin Q32  
  Joe Cash Matt Osburn Q33  
  Jake Blair Erik Laverdiere Q34  
  Bobby Jones Andrew Mack Q35  
  Drew Brand Jesse Rambis Q36  
  Michael Bleech Vince Fierro Q37  
  Jack Delehanty Phil St. Pierre Q38  
  Tony Epie Ben Parker Q39  
  Tim Ryan Travis Schoonover Q40  
  Tyler Lesneski Jeff Soler Q41  
  David Holewinski Jon Sundquist Q42  
  Scott Provencher Garrett Rasmussen Q43  
  Oguz Degirmenci Matthew Hunter Q44  
  Craig Demott Dameon Holmquist Q45  
  Jerod Davis Andre Melo Q46  
  Donny Bass Eric Leeseberg Q47  
  Kevin Craig Eric Wurts Q48  
  Teddy Cook Andreas Olesen Q49  
  Dain Blanton Scott Lane    

Winner's Bracket
Round 1
Match 1: Brad Keenan / John Mayer (17) def. Nick Lucena / Will Strickland (16) 18-21, 21-17, 15-13
Match 2: Hans Stolfus / Scott Wong (9) def. Billy Allen / AJ Mihalic (24, Q7) 21-18, 21-19 (0:40)
Match 3: Paul Baxter / Canyon Ceman (12) def. Mike DiPierro / Ran Kumgisky (21, Q3) 18-21, 21-16, 19-17 (1:07)
Match 4: Matt Olson / Jason Ring (13) def. Albert Hannemann / Ed Ratledge (20, Q1) 21-19, 16-21, 15-9 (1:03)
Match 5: Adam Jewell / Jose Loiola (19) def. Eric Fonoimoana / Chad Turner (14) 21-18, 21-13 (0:50)
Match 6: Ryan Mariano / Larry Witt (11) def. Dain Blanton / Scott Lane (22) 21-15, 24-22 (0:54)
Match 7: Karch Kiraly / Kevin Wong (10) def. Mike Morrison / Ty Tramblie (23, Q4) 27-25, 21-16
Match 8: Brent Doble / Ty Loomis (15) def. Austin Rester / Aaron Wachtfogel (18) 21-17, 15-21, 15-13 (1:10)

Round 2
Match 9: Mike Lambert / Stein Metzger (1) def. Brad Keenan / John Mayer (17) 21-17, 21-10 (0:38)
Match 10: John Hyden / George Roumain (8) def. Hans Stolfus / Scott Wong (9) 21-14, 21-16 (0:40)
Match 11: Paul Baxter / Canyon Ceman (12) def. Dax Holdren / Jeff Nygaard (5) 21-17, 21-18 (0:46)
Match 12: Matt Olson / Jason Ring (13) def. Matt Fuerbringer / Sean Scott (4) 21-14, 26-24 (0:55)
Match 13: Jake Gibb / Sean Rosenthal (3) def. Adam Jewell / Jose Loiola (19) 21-16, 21-17 (0:35)
Match 14: Anthony Medel / Fred Souza (6) def. Ryan Mariano / Larry Witt (11) 19-21, 21-19, 19-17 (1:05)
Match 15: Casey Jennings / Mark Williams (7) def. Karch Kiraly / Kevin Wong (10) 22-20, 17-21, 17-15 (1:07)
Match 16: Phil Dalhausser / Todd Rogers (2) def. Brent Doble / Ty Loomis (15) 24-22, 21-19 (0:58)

Round 3
Match 17: Mike Lambert / Stein Metzger (1) def. John Hyden / George Roumain (8) 21-19, 17-21, 15-12 (1:12)
Match 18: Matt Olson / Jason Ring (13) def. Paul Baxter / Canyon Ceman (12) 21-17, 21-14 (0:44)
Match 19: Jake Gibb / Sean Rosenthal (3) def. Anthony Medel / Fred Souza (6) 19-21, 21-14, 15-10 (1:04)
Match 20: Phil Dalhausser / Todd Rogers (2) def. Casey Jennings / Mark Williams (7) 21-16, 21-23, 15-12 (1:11)

Round 4
Match 21: Matt Olson / Jason Ring (13) def. Mike Lambert / Stein Metzger (1) 24-22, 21-18 (0:53)
Match 22: Phil Dalhausser / Todd Rogers (2) def. Jake Gibb / Sean Rosenthal (3) 21-11, 33-31 (1:07)


Contender's Bracket
Round 1
Match 23: Nick Lucena / Will Strickland (16) def. Brent Doble / Ty Loomis (15) 21-17, 25-23 (0:47)
Match 24: Karch Kiraly / Kevin Wong (10) def. Billy Allen / AJ Mihalic (24, Q7) 21-11, 21-18 (0:36)
Match 25: Ryan Mariano / Larry Witt (11) def. Mike DiPierro / Ran Kumgisky (21, Q3) 21-17, 21-17 (0:46)
Match 26: Albert Hannemann / Ed Ratledge (20, Q1) def. Adam Jewell / Jose Loiola (19) 22-24, 21-19, 15-10 (1:07)
Match 27: Matt Fuerbringer / Sean Scott (4) def. Eric Fonoimoana / Chad Turner (14) 21-19, 17-21, 15-13 (1:12)
Match 28: Dax Holdren / Jeff Nygaard (5) def. Dain Blanton / Scott Lane (22) 21-11, 21-16 (0:41)
Match 29: Hans Stolfus / Scott Wong (9) def. Mike Morrison / Ty Tramblie (23, Q4) 21-13, 23-21 (0:45)
Match 30: Austin Rester / Aaron Wachtfogel (18) def. Brad Keenan / John Mayer (17) 21-17, 21-18 (0:49)

Round 2
Match 31: Karch Kiraly / Kevin Wong (10) def. Nick Lucena / Will Strickland (16) 21-16, 20-22, 15-12 (1:02)
Match 32: Ryan Mariano / Larry Witt (11) def. Albert Hannemann / Ed Ratledge (20, Q1) 21-14, 21-14 (0:44)
Match 33: Dax Holdren / Jeff Nygaard (5) def. Matt Fuerbringer / Sean Scott (4) 17-21, 21-18, 15-12 (1:17)
Match 34: Austin Rester / Aaron Wachtfogel (18) def. Hans Stolfus / Scott Wong (9) 14-21, 21-17, 15-9 (1:16)

Round 3
Match 35: Karch Kiraly / Kevin Wong (10) def. Paul Baxter / Canyon Ceman (12) 21-15, 20-22, 15-12 (1:12)
Match 36: John Hyden / George Roumain (8) def. Ryan Mariano / Larry Witt (11) 21-18, 21-17 (0:46)
Match 37: Casey Jennings / Mark Williams (7) def. Dax Holdren / Jeff Nygaard (5) 21-23, 21-15, 17-15 (1:12)
Match 38: Anthony Medel / Fred Souza (6) def. Austin Rester / Aaron Wachtfogel (18) 18-21, 21-13, 15-11 (1:05)

Round 4
Match 39: Karch Kiraly / Kevin Wong (10) def. John Hyden / George Roumain (8) 14-21, 21-17, 15-13 (1:10)
Match 40: Casey Jennings / Mark Williams (7) def. Anthony Medel / Fred Souza (6) 21-18, 21-17 (0:50)

Round 5
Match 41: Jake Gibb / Sean Rosenthal (3) def. Karch Kiraly / Kevin Wong (10) 21-13, 21-16 (0:45)
Match 42: Mike Lambert / Stein Metzger (1) def. Casey Jennings / Mark Williams (7) 21-15, 16-21, 15-10 (1:10)

Semifinals
Match 43: Jake Gibb / Sean Rosenthal (3) def. Matt Olson / Jason Ring (13) 21-18, 21-15 (0:50)
Match 44: Phil Dalhausser / Todd Rogers (2) def. Mike Lambert / Stein Metzger (1) 21-14, 21-19 (0:48)

Finals
Match 45: Phil Dalhausser / Todd Rogers (2) def. Jake Gibb / Sean Rosenthal (3) 21-14, 21-18 (0:59)

2007 Men's Miami Open Champions >> Phil Dalhausser /Todd Rogers


  .                                             Phil Dalhausser                                                                                                            Todd Rogers
                             
Men's $200,000 AVP Cuervo Gold Crown Miami Open
April 13-15, 2007 
Finish Player Partner Seed Winnings Points
1 Phil Dalhausser Todd Rogers 2 $20,000.00 360
2 Jake Gibb Sean Rosenthal 3 $15,000.00 324
3 Mike Lambert Stein Metzger 1 $9,500.00 270
3 Matt Olson Jason Ring 13 $9,500.00 270
5 Casey Jennings Mark Williams 7 $6,000.00 216
5 Karch Kiraly Kevin Wong 10 $6,000.00 216
7 Anthony Medel Fred Souza 6 $4,650.00 180
7 John Hyden George Roumain 8 $4,650.00 180
9 Dax Holdren Jeff Nygaard 5 $2,875.00 144
9 Ryan Mariano Larry Witt 11 $2,875.00 144
9 Paul Baxter Canyon Ceman 12 $2,875.00 144
9 Austin Rester Aaron Wachtfogel 18 $2,875.00 144
13 Matt Fuerbringer Sean Scott 4 $1,700.00 108
13 Hans Stolfus Scott Wong 9 $1,700.00 108
13 Nick Lucena Will Strickland 16 $1,700.00 108
13 Albert Hannemann Ed Ratledge 20, Q1 $1,700.00 108
17 Eric Fonoimoana Chad Turner 14 $800.00 72
17 Brent Doble Ty Loomis 15 $800.00 72
17 Brad Keenan John Mayer 17 $800.00 72
17 Adam Jewell Jose Loiola 19 $800.00 72
17 Mike DiPierro Ran Kumgisky 21, Q3 $800.00 72
17 Dain Blanton Scott Lane 22 $800.00 72
17 Mike Morrison Ty Tramblie 23, Q4 $800.00 72
17 Billy Allen AJ Mihalic 24, Q7 $800.00 72
25 Ben Koski Jeff Minc Q5 $.00 36
25 David Fischer Scott Hill Q6 $.00 36
25 John Moran Brad Torsone Q8 $.00 36
25 Keawe Adolpho Mark Van Zwieten Q31 $.00 36
29 Chad Mowrey Kimo Tuyay Q11 $.00 18
29 Jim Nichols Jon Stalls Q12 $.00 18
29 Chris Harger Justin Phipps Q13 $.00 18
29 Dana Camacho Pete DiVenere Q15 $.00 18
29 Jim Van Zwieten Steve Van Zwieten Q16 $.00 18
29 Danko Iordanov Monte Tucker Q23 $.00 18
29 Tyler Lesneski Jeff Soler Q41 $.00 18
29 Jerod Davis Andre Melo Q46 $.00 18
37 Jeff Carlucci Adam Roberts Q2 $.00 12
37 Kevin Dake Lucas Wisniakowski Q9 $.00 12
37 Jon Mesko Leonardo Moraes Q10 $.00 12
37 Russ Marchewka Fernando Sabla Q14 $.00 12
37 Matt Ogin Todd Strassberger Q18 $.00 12
37 David DiPierro Matt Heagy Q21 $.00 12
37 Ihor Akinshyn Tim McNichol Q22 $.00 12
37 Matt Davis Jon Mackey Q26 $.00 12
37 Jeff Murrell Soeren Schneider Q28 $.00 12
37 William Chenoweth Guy Hamilton Q29 $.00 12
37 Nate Hagstrom Ed Lunnen Q30 $.00 12
37 Tim Church Ryan Cronin Q32 $.00 12
37 Jack Delehanty Phil St. Pierre Q38 $.00 12
37 Tim Ryan Travis Schoonover Q40 $.00 12
37 Craig Demott Dameon Holmquist Q45 $.00 12
37 Kevin Craig Eric Wurts Q48 $.00 12
53 Everett Matthews Ivan Mercer Q17 $.00 8
53 Erik Gomez John Michelau Q19 $.00 8
53 Gaston Macau Rony Seikaly Q20 $.00 8
53 Yariv Lerner Rob McNaughton Q24 $.00 8
53 Shane Nelson Vince Zanzucchi Q25 $.00 8
53 Craig Cromwell Wayne Holly Q27 $.00 8
53 Joe Cash Matt Osburn Q33 $.00 8
53 Jake Blair Erik Laverdiere Q34 $.00 8
53 Bobby Jones Andrew Mack Q35 $.00 8
53 Drew Brand Jesse Rambis Q36 $.00 8
53 Michael Bleech Vince Fierro Q37 $.00 8
53 Tony Epie Ben Parker Q39 $.00 8
53 David Holewinski Jon Sundquist Q42 $.00 8
53 Scott Provencher Garrett Rasmussen Q43 $.00 8
53 Oguz Degirmenci Matthew Hunter Q44 $.00 8
53 Donny Bass Eric Leeseberg Q47 $.00 8
53 Teddy Cook Andreas Olesen Q49 $.00 8

2007
Women's $200,000 AVP Cuervo Gold Crown Miami Open
April 13th-April 15th, 2007

 
          


Women's $100,000 AVP Cuervo Gold Crown Miami Open

April 13-15, 2007

Women's Qualifier Entries:
Claire Robertson, Rolling Hills Estates, Calif. / Julie Romias, Manhattan Beach, Calif.
Cinta Preston, Spring Valley, Calif. / Beth Van Fleet, San Diego
Tara Kuk, Clearwater, Fla. / Kim Whitney, St. Petersburg, Fla.
Courtney Guerra, Santa Barbara, Calif. / Chrissie Zartman, Hermosa Beach, Calif.
Jill Changaris, Port Hueneme, Calif. / Sara Dukes, Danville, Calif.
Lisa Marshall, Venice, Calif. / Marla O'Hara, Agoura Hills, Calif.
Suzana Manole, San Diego / Lauren Mills, San Diego
Dana Schilling, Huntington Beach, Calif. / Alicia Zamparelli, Hermosa Beach, Calif.
Angie Hall, San Diego / Laura Ratto, San Diego
Leilani Kamahoahoa, El Segundo, Calif. / Federica Tonon, Waialua, Hawaii
Iwona Lodzik, Prospect Heights, Ill. / Kristin Ursillo, San Diego
Capri Hilgendorf, West Palm Beach, Fla. / Alexandra Sevillano, Gulfport, Fla.
Nicki Fusco, Hermosa Beach, Calif. / Gina Kirstein, Wilmington, N.C.
Karen Hoyt, St. Pete Beach, Fla. / Kirstin Olsen, Hermosa Beach, Calif.
Johanna Schatz, Topanga, Calif. / Vladia Vignato, Santa Monica, Calif.
Bonnie Levin, Miami / Meghan Wallin, Siesta Key, Fla.
Nicole Midwin, San Jose, Calif. / Colleen Smith, San Diego
Wendy Lockhart, St. Pete Beach, Fla. / Teri Van D-yke, Coconut Creek, Fla. (sorry, banned word)
Mara Drazina, Hermosa Beach, Calif. / Andrea Peterson, Hermosa Beach, Calif.
Raquel Beson, Hermosa Beach, Calif. / Amy Castro
Chara Harris, Sarasota, Fla. / Brooke Langston, Sarasota, Fla.
Julie Caldwell, Huntington Beach, Calif. / Jennifer Lombardi, Hermosa Beach, Calif.
Jennifer Corral, Westlake Village, Calif. / Elena Salvador, Ventura, Calif.
Kendra Jackson, Coral Springs, Fla. / Ro LaHara, Royal Oak, Mich.
April Oberhelman, Woonsocket, R.I. / Becca Smith, Somerset, Mass.
Vicky St. Pierre, Feeding Hills, Mass. / Anne Vaughan, San Diego
Victoria Prince, Honolulu / Jessica Veris, Manhattan Beach, Calif.
Katie Carter, Brentwood, Tenn. / Michelle Cook, Mount Juliet, Tenn.
Kristy Hartley, Bonita Springs, Fla. / Brooke Youngquist, Estero, Fla.
Jennifer Bily, Atlanta / Wanda Brenton, George Town, Cayman Islands

Women's $100,000 AVP Cuervo Gold Crown Miami Open
April 13-15, 2007 

Qualifier Bracket
Round 1
Match 2: Nicole Midwin / Colleen Smith (Q17) def. Bonnie Levin / Meghan Wallin (Q16) 21-18, 14-21, 15-4 (0:50)
Match 3: Angie Hall / Laura Ratto (Q9) def. April Oberhelman / Becca Smith (Q24) 21-7, 21-7 (0:30)
Match 4: Dana Schilling / Alicia Zamparelli (Q8) def. Vicky St. Pierre / Anne Vaughan (Q25) 21-4, 21-10 (0:29)
Match 5: Jill Changaris / Sara Dukes (24, Q5) def. Kristy Hartley / Brooke Youngquist (Q28) 21-13, 21-12 (0:36)
Match 6: Capri Hilgendorf / Alexandra Sevillano (Q12) def. Julie Caldwell / Jennifer Lombardi (Q21) 21-13, 21-17 (0:38)
Match 7: Nicki Fusco / Gina Kirstein (Q13) def. Chara Harris / Brooke Langston (Q20) 23-21, 21-17 (0:44)
Match 8: Courtney Guerra / Chrissie Zartman (Q4) def. Jennifer Bily / Wanda Brenton (Q29) 21-16, 21-9 (0:40)
Match 10: Raquel Beson / Amy Castro (Q19) def. Karen Hoyt / Kirstin Olsen (Q14) 21-16, 21-16 (0:45)
Match 11: Iwona Lodzik / Kristin Ursillo (Q11) def. Jennifer Corral / Elena Salvador (Q22) 21-12, 21-9 (0:35)
Match 12: Lisa Marshall / Marla O'Hara (Q6) def. Katie Carter / Michelle Cook (Q27) 21-16, 21-19 (0:45)
Match 13: Suzana Manole / Lauren Mills (Q7) def. Victoria Prince / Jessica Veris (Q26) 21-18, 21-18 (0:44)
Match 14: Leilani Kamahoahoa / Federica Tonon (Q10) def. Kendra Jackson / Ro LaHara (Q23) 21-18, 21-15 (0:41)
Match 15: Johanna Schatz / Vladia Vignato (Q15) def. Wendy Lockhart / Teri Van Dyke (Q18) 18-21, 21-19, 15-10 (1:03)

Round 2
Match 17: Claire Robertson / Julie Romias (20, Q1) def. Nicole Midwin / Colleen Smith (Q17) 21-14, 21-16 (0:40)
Match 18: Dana Schilling / Alicia Zamparelli (Q8) def. Angie Hall / Laura Ratto (Q9) 21-15, 21-15 (0:38)
Match 19: Jill Changaris / Sara Dukes (24, Q5) def. Capri Hilgendorf / Alexandra Sevillano (Q12) 21-7, 21-19 (0:41)
Match 20: Courtney Guerra / Chrissie Zartman (Q4) def. Nicki Fusco / Gina Kirstein (Q13) 21-12, 21-15 (0:38)
Match 21: Tara Kuk / Kim Whitney (22, Q3) def. Raquel Beson / Amy Castro (Q19) 21-11, 21-15 (0:42)
Match 22: Iwona Lodzik / Kristin Ursillo (Q11) def. Lisa Marshall / Marla O'Hara (Q6) 21-7, 19-21, 15-7 (0:48)
Match 23: Suzana Manole / Lauren Mills (Q7) def. Leilani Kamahoahoa / Federica Tonon (Q10) 21-14, 21-16 (0:37)
Match 24: Cinta Preston / Beth Van Fleet (23, Q2) def. Johanna Schatz / Vladia Vignato (Q15) 21-15, 23-25, 15-10 (1:04)

Round 3
Match 25: Claire Robertson / Julie Romias (20, Q1) def. Dana Schilling / Alicia Zamparelli (Q8) 21-15, 21-18 (0:45)
Match 26: Jill Changaris / Sara Dukes (24, Q5) def. Courtney Guerra / Chrissie Zartman (Q4) 21-15, 21-14 (0:41)
Match 27: Tara Kuk / Kim Whitney (22, Q3) def. Iwona Lodzik / Kristin Ursillo (Q11) 21-17, 21-13 (0:34)
Match 28: Cinta Preston / Beth Van Fleet (23, Q2) def. Suzana Manole / Lauren Mills (Q7) 21-15, 21-23, 15-13 (0:59)

Women's Main Draw Entries:

Misty May-Treanor, Coral Springs, Fla. / Kerri Walsh, Redondo Beach, Calif. (1)
Nicole Branagh, Torrance, Calif. / Elaine Youngs, Durango, Colo. (2)
Annett Davis, Valencia, Calif. / Jenny Johnson Jordan, Tarzana, Calif. (3)
Tyra Turner, Fort Myers Beach, Fla. / Rachel Wacholder, Redondo Beach, Calif. (4)
Dianne DeNecochea, San Diego / Barbra Fontana, Manhattan Beach, Calif. (5)
Holly McPeak, Manhattan Beach, Calif. / Logan Tom, Long Beach, Calif. (6)
Carrie Dodd, El Segundo, Calif. / Tatiana Minello, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil (7)
Jenny Pavley, Redondo Beach, Calif. / Sarah Straton, Redondo Beach, Calif. (8)
Michelle More, Redondo Beach, Calif. / Suzanne Stonebarger, Redondo Beach, Calif. (9)
Jennifer Fopma, Bellflower, Calif. / Stacy Rouwenhorst, Cypress, Calif. (10)
Jennifer Boss, San Clemente, Calif. / April Ross, Diamond Bar, Calif. (11)
Angie Akers, Redondo Beach, Calif. / Brooke Hanson, Ventura, Calif. (12)
Alicia Polzin, San Diego / Paula Roca, Redondo Beach, Calif. (13)
Heidi Ilustre, Honolulu / Diane Pascua, Carlsbad, Calif. (14)
Katie Lindquist, Huntington Beach, Calif. / Tracy Lindquist, Fountain Valley, Calif. (15)
Janelle Ruen, Newport Beach, Calif. / Jennifer Snyder, Long Beach, Calif. (16)
Angela Lewis, Lafayette, La. / Priscilla Lima, Lafayette, La. (17)
Lauren Fendrick, Carlsbad, Calif. / Brittany Hochevar, Long Beach, Calif. (18)
Ashley Ivy, Austin, Texas / Heather Lowe, Redondo Beach, Calif. (19)
Jenelle Koester, San Diego / Saralyn Smith, Huntington Beach, Calif. (20)

Women's $100,000 AVP Cuervo Gold Crown Miami Open
April 13-15, 2007 
Finish Player Partner Seed  
  Misty May-Treanor Kerri Walsh 1  
  Nicole Branagh Elaine Youngs 2  
  Annett Davis Jenny Johnson Jordan 3  
  Tyra Turner Rachel Wacholder 4  
  Dianne DeNecochea Barbra Fontana 5  
  Holly McPeak Logan Tom 6  
  Carrie Dodd Tatiana Minello 7  
  Jenny Pavley Sarah Straton 8  
  Michelle More Suzanne Stonebarger 9  
  Jennifer Fopma Stacy Rouwenhorst 10  
  Jennifer Boss April Ross 11  
  Angie Akers Brooke Hanson 12  
  Alicia Polzin Paula Roca 13  
  Heidi Ilustre Diane Pascua 14  
  Lauren Fendrick Brittany Hochevar 15  
  Katie Lindquist Tracy Lindquist 16  
  Janelle Ruen Jennifer Snyder 17  
  Angela Lewis Priscilla Lima 18  
  Ashley Ivy Heather Lowe 19  
  Claire Robertson Julie Romias Q1  
  Cinta Preston Beth Van Fleet Q2  
  Tara Kuk Kim Whitney Q3  
  Courtney Guerra Chrissie Zartman Q4  
  Jill Changaris Sara Dukes Q5  
  Lisa Marshall Marla O'Hara Q6  
  Suzana Manole Lauren Mills Q7  
  Dana Schilling Alicia Zamparelli Q8  
  Angie Hall Laura Ratto Q9  
  Leilani Kamahoahoa Federica Tonon Q10  
  Iwona Lodzik Kristin Ursillo Q11  
  Capri Hilgendorf Alexandra Sevillano Q12  
  Nicki Fusco Gina Kirstein Q13  
  Karen Hoyt Kirstin Olsen Q14  
  Johanna Schatz Vladia Vignato Q15  
  Bonnie Levin Meghan Wallin Q16  
  Nicole Midwin Colleen Smith Q17  
  Wendy Lockhart Teri Van Dyke Q18  
  Raquel Beson Amy Castro Q19  
  Chara Harris Brooke Langston Q20  
  Julie Caldwell Jennifer Lombardi Q21  
  Jennifer Corral Elena Salvador Q22  
  Kendra Jackson Ro LaHara Q23  
  April Oberhelman Becca Smith Q24  
  Vicky St. Pierre Anne Vaughan Q25  
  Victoria Prince Jessica Veris Q26  
  Katie Carter Michelle Cook Q27  
  Kristy Hartley Brooke Youngquist Q28  
  Jennifer Bily Wanda Brenton Q29  
  Jenelle Koester Saralyn Smith     

Winner's Bracket
Round 1
Match 1: Katie Lindquist / Tracy Lindquist (16) def. Janelle Ruen / Jennifer Snyder (17) 21-16, 21-16 (0:41)
Match 2: Michelle More / Suzanne Stonebarger (9) def. Jill Changaris / Sara Dukes (24, Q5) 16-21, 21-19, 15-9 (1:02)
Match 3: Angie Akers / Brooke Hanson (12) def. Jenelle Koester / Saralyn Smith (21) 21-16, 18-21, 15-8 (0:44)
Match 4: Alicia Polzin / Paula Roca (13) def. Claire Robertson / Julie Romias (20, Q1) 21-18, 21-15 (0:44)
Match 5: Heidi Ilustre / Diane Pascua (14) def. Ashley Ivy / Heather Lowe (19) 22-20, 22-20 (0:44)
Match 6: Jennifer Boss / April Ross (11) def. Tara Kuk / Kim Whitney (22, Q3) 21-12, 21-16 (0:35)
Match 7: Cinta Preston / Beth Van Fleet (23, Q2) def. Jennifer Fopma / Stacy Rouwenhorst (10) 21-19, 26-24 (0:42)
Match 8: Angela Lewis / Priscilla Lima (18) def. Lauren Fendrick / Brittany Hochevar (15) 21-15, 21-16 (0:42)

Round 2
Match 9: Misty May-Treanor / Kerri Walsh (1) def. Katie Lindquist / Tracy Lindquist (16) 21-15, 24-26, 15-10 (0:50)
Match 10: Jenny Pavley / Sarah Straton (8) def. Michelle More / Suzanne Stonebarger (9) 21-18, 21-11 (0:37)
Match 11: Angie Akers / Brooke Hanson (12) def. Dianne DeNecochea / Barbra Fontana (5) 26-24, 19-21, 15-12 (1:08)
Match 12: Tyra Turner / Rachel Wacholder (4) def. Alicia Polzin / Paula Roca (13) 21-16, 21-15 (0:35)
Match 13: Annett Davis / Jenny Johnson Jordan (3) def. Heidi Ilustre / Diane Pascua (14) 21-12, 21-14 (0:34)
Match 14: Jennifer Boss / April Ross (11) def. Holly McPeak / Logan Tom (6) 21-19, 21-14 (0:56)
Match 15: Carrie Dodd / Tatiana Minello (7) def. Cinta Preston / Beth Van Fleet (23, Q2) 21-15, 21-6 (0:34)
Match 16: Nicole Branagh / Elaine Youngs (2) def. Angela Lewis / Priscilla Lima (18) 21-17, 21-19 (0:42)

Round 3
Match 17: Misty May-Treanor / Kerri Walsh (1) def. Jenny Pavley / Sarah Straton (8) 21-17, 21-18 (0:34)
Match 18: Tyra Turner / Rachel Wacholder (4) def. Angie Akers / Brooke Hanson (12) 16-21, 21-16, 19-17 (0:58)
Match 19: Jennifer Boss / April Ross (11) def. Annett Davis / Jenny Johnson Jordan (3) 20-22, 21-18, 15-10 (1:07)
Match 20: Nicole Branagh / Elaine Youngs (2) def. Carrie Dodd / Tatiana Minello (7) 21-16, 21-16 (0:37)

Round 4
Match 21: Misty May-Treanor / Kerri Walsh (1) def. Tyra Turner / Rachel Wacholder (4) 21-15, 21-15 (0:40)
Match 22: Jennifer Boss / April Ross (11) def. Nicole Branagh / Elaine Youngs (2) 21-17, 17-21, 15-12 (1:03)


Contender's Bracket
Round 1
Match 23: Angela Lewis / Priscilla Lima (18) def. Janelle Ruen / Jennifer Snyder (17) 20-22, 21-15, 15-7 (0:56)
Match 24: Jill Changaris / Sara Dukes (24, Q5) def. Cinta Preston / Beth Van Fleet (23, Q2) 21-14, 21-14 (0:36)
Match 25: Holly McPeak / Logan Tom (6) def. Jenelle Koester / Saralyn Smith (21) 21-9, 21-13 (0:40)
Match 26: Heidi Ilustre / Diane Pascua (14) def. Claire Robertson / Julie Romias (20, Q1) 21-13, 21-23, 15-13 (1:13)
Match 27: Alicia Polzin / Paula Roca (13) def. Ashley Ivy / Heather Lowe (19) 21-15, 15-21, 15-10 (0:53)
Match 28: Dianne DeNecochea / Barbra Fontana (5) def. Tara Kuk / Kim Whitney (22, Q3) 21-23, 21-14, 15-10 (1:05)
Match 29: Michelle More / Suzanne Stonebarger (9) def. Jennifer Fopma / Stacy Rouwenhorst (10) 21-16, 24-22 (1:04)
Match 30: Lauren Fendrick / Brittany Hochevar (15) def. Katie Lindquist / Tracy Lindquist (16) 22-20, 15-21, 15-7 (0:54)

Round 2
Match 31: Angela Lewis / Priscilla Lima (18) def. Jill Changaris / Sara Dukes (24, Q5) 21-18, 21-16 (0:43)
Match 32: Heidi Ilustre / Diane Pascua (14) def. Holly McPeak / Logan Tom (6) 25-23, 22-20 (0:48)
Match 33: Dianne DeNecochea / Barbra Fontana (5) def. Alicia Polzin / Paula Roca (13) 21-19, 21-16 (0:47)
Match 34: Michelle More / Suzanne Stonebarger (9) def. Lauren Fendrick / Brittany Hochevar (15) 17-21, 21-13, 15-13 (1:04)

Round 3
Match 35: Angie Akers / Brooke Hanson (12) def. Angela Lewis / Priscilla Lima (18) 25-23, 21-19
Match 36: Heidi Ilustre / Diane Pascua (14) def. Jenny Pavley / Sarah Straton (8) 14-21, 21-17, 15-11 (0:49)
Match 37: Dianne DeNecochea / Barbra Fontana (5) def. Carrie Dodd / Tatiana Minello (7) 23-25, 24-22, 15-6 (1:05)
Match 38: Annett Davis / Jenny Johnson Jordan (3) def. Michelle More / Suzanne Stonebarger (9) 21-13, 21-12 (0:32)

Round 4
Match 39: Angie Akers / Brooke Hanson (12) def. Heidi Ilustre / Diane Pascua (14) 21-16, 21-18 (0:40)
Match 40: Dianne DeNecochea / Barbra Fontana (5) def. Annett Davis / Jenny Johnson Jordan (3) 21-13, 23-21 (0:46)

Round 5
Match 41: Nicole Branagh / Elaine Youngs (2) def. Angie Akers / Brooke Hanson (12) 21-11, 21-16 (0:37)
Match 42: Dianne DeNecochea / Barbra Fontana (5) def. Tyra Turner / Rachel Wacholder (4) 19-21, 21-15, 15-12 (1:04)

Semifinals
Match 43: Nicole Branagh / Elaine Youngs (2) def. Misty May-Treanor / Kerri Walsh (1) 21-19, 21-19 (0:43)
Match 44: Jennifer Boss / April Ross (11) def. Dianne DeNecochea / Barbra Fontana (5) 21-14, 21-19 (0:43)

Finals
Match 45: Nicole Branagh / Elaine Youngs (2) def. Jennifer Boss / April Ross (11) 21-19, 21-15 (0:56)

2007 Women's Miami Open Tournament Champions >> Nicole Branagh / Elaine Youngs

                                    
                      Nicole Branagh                                                                                     Elaine Youngs

                             
Women's $200,000 AVP Cuervo Gold Crown Miami Open
April 13-15, 2007 
Finish Player Partner Seed Winnings Points
1 Nicole Branagh Elaine Youngs 2 $20,000.00 360
2 Jennifer Boss April Ross 11 $15,000.00 324
3 Misty May-Treanor Kerri Walsh 1 $9,500.00 270
3 Dianne DeNecochea Barbra Fontana 5 $9,500.00 270
5 Tyra Turner Rachel Wacholder 4 $6,000.00 216
5 Angie Akers Brooke Hanson 12 $6,000.00 216
7 Annett Davis Jenny Johnson Jordan 3 $4,650.00 180
7 Heidi Ilustre Diane Pascua 14 $4,650.00 180
9 Carrie Dodd Tatiana Minello 7 $2,875.00 144
9 Jenny Pavley Sarah Straton 8 $2,875.00 144
9 Michelle More Suzanne Stonebarger 9 $2,875.00 144
9 Angela Lewis Priscilla Lima 18 $2,875.00 144
13 Holly McPeak Logan Tom 6 $1,700.00 108
13 Alicia Polzin Paula Roca 13 $1,700.00 108
13 Lauren Fendrick Brittany Hochevar 15 $1,700.00 108
13 Jill Changaris Sara Dukes 24, Q5 $1,700.00 108
17 Jennifer Fopma Stacy Rouwenhorst 10 $800.00 72
17 Katie Lindquist Tracy Lindquist 16 $800.00 72
17 Janelle Ruen Jennifer Snyder 17 $800.00 72
17 Ashley Ivy Heather Lowe 19 $800.00 72
17 Claire Robertson Julie Romias 20, Q1 $800.00 72
17 Jenelle Koester Saralyn Smith 21 $800.00 72
17 Tara Kuk Kim Whitney 22, Q3 $800.00 72
17 Cinta Preston Beth Van Fleet 23, Q2 $800.00 72
25 Courtney Guerra Chrissie Zartman Q4 $.00 36
25 Suzana Manole Lauren Mills Q7 $.00 36
25 Dana Schilling Alicia Zamparelli Q8 $.00 36
25 Iwona Lodzik Kristin Ursillo Q11 $.00 36
29 Lisa Marshall Marla O'Hara Q6 $.00 18
29 Angie Hall Laura Ratto Q9 $.00 18
29 Leilani Kamahoahoa Federica Tonon Q10 $.00 18
29 Capri Hilgendorf Alexandra Sevillano Q12 $.00 18
29 Nicki Fusco Gina Kirstein Q13 $.00 18
29 Johanna Schatz Vladia Vignato Q15 $.00 18
29 Nicole Midwin Colleen Smith Q17 $.00 18
29 Raquel Beson Amy Castro Q19 $.00 18
37 Karen Hoyt Kirstin Olsen Q14 $.00 12
37 Bonnie Levin Meghan Wallin Q16 $.00 12
37 Wendy Lockhart Teri Van Dyke Q18 $.00 12
37 Chara Harris Brooke Langston Q20 $.00 12
37 Julie Caldwell Jennifer Lombardi Q21 $.00 12
37 Jennifer Corral Elena Salvador Q22 $.00 12
37 Kendra Jackson Ro LaHara Q23 $.00 12
37 April Oberhelman Becca Smith Q24 $.00 12
37 Vicky St. Pierre Anne Vaughan Q25 $.00 12
37 Victoria Prince Jessica Veris Q26 $.00 12
37 Katie Carter Michelle Cook Q27 $.00 12
37 Kristy Hartley Brooke Youngquist Q28 $.00 12
37 Jennifer Bily Wanda Brenton Q29 $.00 12


AVP on DVD
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Photos:

$200,000 AVP Cuervo Gold Crown Miami Open
April 13-15, 2007

Women's Volleyball Qualifier My Photos

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$200,000 AVP Cuervo Gold Crown Miami Open
April 13-15, 2007

Men's and Women's Volleyball Qualifier My Photos

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April 13-15, 2007

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April 13-15, 2007

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April 13-15, 2007



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April 13-15, 2007

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Articles 2007:

Countdown to Miami: AVP Quick Hits
By Mike Scarr / AVP.com
LOS ANGELES -- The Crocs AVP Tour is set for another year, an 18-event season that will feature $4 million in prize money.
It will be Karch Kiraly' last season on the Tour, while Misty May-Treanor is poised to become the women's career individual titlist by eclipsing Holly McPeak's mark of 72 victories.
Those are just a couple of this year's story lines and it all begins April 13 in Miami.
The favorites: Granting May-Treanor and Kerri Walsh favorite status is akin to seeding Florida No. 1 in the NCAA tournament, but the fact remains the pair is tops as the season opens. Things are a bit more crowded on the men's side, as last year's top team of Mike Lambert and Stein Metzger will be pushed by Phil Dalhausser and Todd Rogers and by Jake Gibb and Sean Rosenthal.
The contenders: Looking to make things interesting on the women's side of the draw this season in the chase of May-Treanor/Walsh is a quartet of teams. Those are: Elaine Youngs and Nicole Branagh; Rachel Wacholder and Tyra Turner; Jenny Johnson Jordan and Annett Davis; and Dianne DeNecochea and Barbra Fontana. The men's duo of Jeff Nygaard and Dax Holdren is poised for a push into the top class as well.
The dark horses: McPeak is hoping to hold off May for the most individual wins by a woman on tour, and she'll team with Logan Tom as they gear toward returning to the podium. Other women's teams that will be hoping to make a move this season are April Ross and Nancy Mason; Jennifer Boss and Keao Burdine; and Carrie Dodd and Tatiana Minello. On the men's side, Matt Fuerbringer and Sean Scott; Hans Stolfus and Scott Wong; Casey Jennings and Mark Williams; Larry Witt and Ryan Mariano; and George Roumain and John Hyden all want to move up the ladder.
Taking a step forward: Anthony Medel and Fred Souza hooked up halfway through 2006 and looked poised to continue their progress this season, while last year's top male rookie Brad Keenan and teammate John Mayer are also ready to make noise.
Best serves, Women: Youngs and Branagh. Men: Souza, Lambert, Hans Stolfus, Aaron Wachtfogul, Medel and Mariano
Best passers, Women: McPeak.  Men: Kiraly and Rogers.
Best defenders, Women: May, Mason, McPeak and Wacholder. Men: Rogers and Jennings; Holdren and Metzger.
Best blockers, Men: Dalhausser, Lambert, Nygaard and Fuerbringer. Women: Walsh and Youngs
Best cutter, Women: May. Men: Rogers
Best pokey: Metzger
Best fingertip saving dig: Brooke Hanson
Best roll shot: Kiraly
Top sideout threats, Men: Fuerbringer/Scott and Gibb/Rosenthal. Women: May/Walsh, Branagh/Youngs
Best nicknames, Women: Turtle, May; Six Feet of Sunshine, Walsh; and Team Gorgeous, Michelle More/Suzanne Stonebarger. Men: The Thin Beast, Dalhausser; The Big Nasty, Gibb; Superman, Rosenthal; The Professor, Rogers; The Hawaiian Curtain, Lambert; and The Kid, Jennings
Oh, doctor: Roumain (broken finger) Tom (abdominal tear) and Brent Doble (shoulder surgery) are all looking to beat injuries from last year and return to form in 2007.
They said it: "I don't think I've ever competed on the AVP Tour or any domestic tour that has had 18 U.S. events. Right there, that is a huge sign that we're growing. Cities want us and that is exciting to go into a city where AVP puts on a great show and it is fun to be a part of that." --- McPeak
Three burning questions:
Will May-Treanor and Walsh post a perfect season? The quick answer would be no given the difficulty of not suffering a defeat over 18 events, but their numbers indicate it's possible. The pair won their first four events last season, six of the first seven and 13 of 15 overall. Walsh and May-Treanor also placed first and second, respectively, at the Las Vegas Gods and Goddesses tournament. They get their first shot in the city that has seen perfection before. The Miami Dolphins are the NFL's last perfect team, a 17-0 mark in 1972.
Is a period of parity set for the men's side? The Dalhausser/Rogers duo won eight times last year, while Lambert/Metzger notched five victories with 14 Final Four berths out of a possible 15. The teams of Gibb/Rosenthal and Fuerbringer/Jennings both earned a victory. While those wins were mostly clustered among the few, the spoils could be spread among the many this season.
Can Karch do it again? There will likely be no greater favorite than Kiraly as he takes one last spin around the AVP Tour, participating in 11 events. He last tasted victory in 2005, but he's healthy and motivated, and with four Southern California tournaments on the calendar Kiraly looks to go out in style with teammate Kevin Wong.
Mark your calendar: April 13-15, season opener in Miami; May 10-13 in Glendale, Ariz., May-Treanor could be in line to break record; August 9-12, Kiraly's final appearance in Manhattan Beach Open; Aug. 16-19, AVP visits Boston; Aug. 30-Sept. 2, regular season finale in Cincinnati; Sept. 6-8, Gods and Goddesses in Las Vegas; Sept. 14-16, Best of Beach in San Francisco.
Fearless prediction: Kiraly notches career win No. 149.
Mike Scarr is a senior reporter for AVP.com. Keith Dobkowski contributed to this report.
 
AVP Pro Beach Volleyball Tour's Opening Day takes place Saturday April 14 in Miami, Florida. Buy Tickets Today!
The 2007 AVP Crocs Tour launches its season with the AVP Cuervo Gold Crown Miami Open April 14 and 15. See three-time gold medal winner Karch Kiraly's final stop in South Florida. Tickets available at AVP.com
Miami, Flordia (PRWEB) April 10, 2007 -- The first serve of the 2007 AVP Crocs Pro Beach Volleyball Tour will take place Saturday April 14, 2007 at Bicentennial Park in Miami and continue through Sunday April 15, 2007. Tickets are available at AVP.com/Miami.
The opening stop in Miami is the first of three AVP Cuervo Gold Crown events. The second will take place in Dallas April 19 - 22, and the final in Huntington Beach May 3 - 6, where the largest check in AVP history, $100,000 will be awarded. In total the 2007 AVP Crocs Tour makes 18 stops across the United States featuring 150 of the top Pro Beach Volleyball players in the world.
Heading the list of the 150 athletes are the 2004 Olympic Gold Medalists Misty May-Treanor and Kerri Walsh. This duo has dominated the beach since their team debut in 2003. In 2006, May-Treanor and Walsh won 13 of 15 team tournaments including the season opener in Ft. Lauderdale, the lone Florida stop on the 2006 tour.
In 2007, May-Treanor and Walsh will look to continue their run from the previous four seasons where the duo has won the opening event of the tour. All four previous opening events took place in South Florida, where May-Treanor and Walsh have dominated having not lost a match and only dropping three games along the way.
Several formidable teams stand in May-Treanor and Walsh's way, and hope to the put an end to the run. Second-seed Annett Davis and Jenny Johnson Jordan, winners of eight championships together, were Olympians in 2000. 2004 Bronze Medalist Elaine Youngs will play Nicole Branagh. Seven-time winner Rachel Wacholder will partner with Tyra Turner. And career titles leader and 2004 Olympic Bronze medal winner Holly McPeak will team with two-time Olympian Logan Tom.
The story on the men's side is the final hurrah for Karch Kiraly. Kiraly, winner of 148 titles and three gold medals, announced that 2007 will be his last on AVP Crocs Tour. Kiraly has been the face of Beach Volleyball for three decades, taking to the sand a final time with his fluorescent Pink Speedo Hat. Miami will be the last time for Volleyball fans in Florida to say thank you to the greatest who ever played. Much like the retirements of Julius "Dr. J" Erving, Kareem Abdul Jabbar, Cal Ripken, and John Elway, fans will get the opportunity to say goodbye in person to a legend.
While Kiraly, who is partnering with former Olympian Kevin Wong, is in search of his 149 career title, several talented teams stand in his way. Top-seeded Mike Lambert and Stein Metzger won five titles and the Crocs Cup in 2006. Second-seeded Todd Rogers and Phil Dalhausser won eight team titles. And third-seeded Jake Gibb and Sean Rosenthal look to repeat their opening performance last season with a victory.
On Friday, former NBA star and the first ever draft pick of the Miami Heat, Rony Seikaly, will try to qualify for the AVP Miami Open. Admission is free to see Seikaly compete to play the best beach volleyball pros in the world.
Do not miss a serve, dig or spike this weekend in Miami. Buy your tickets today at AVP.com/Miami!

May-Treanor already eyeing shot at gold in Beijing
TIM REYNOLDS
Associated Press
MIAMI - She's considered the most dominant player in beach volleyball, perhaps the best to ever compete on the sand.
And Misty May-Treanor still wants more.
It's not enough that she swept every big award on the AVP Tour last season. Team of the year (with another star, Kerri Walsh) for the fourth straight year. Best offensive player for the third consecutive time. She was league MVP for the second season in a row, and even took home best defensive player honors.
A new beach season opens this weekend in Miami. But a bigger goal serves as May-Treanor's as her primary motivation - she wants to win another Olympic gold medal at Beijing next year.
The calendar says 2007. May-Treanor doesn't deny her eyes are already seeing 2008.
"As soon as the last ball dropped last year, Kerri and I started getting real focused on being ready for '08," May-Treanor said. "Obviously, we've got to think about '07 first. The AVP is actually going to prepare us because a lot of the best U.S. teams are on this tour and we'll be competing against them every weekend."
The AVP format is for two-player teams, with men's and women's divisions, and the Miami tournament is the first of 18 on this year's docket. May-Treanor and Walsh will be huge favorites to open the season with a win, which isn't surprising since they prevailed in 13 of the 15 AVP events they played in 2006.
The 29-year-old May-Treanor is getting a home-field advantage of sorts: She and husband Matt Treanor, a catcher for the Florida Marlins, make their home in Coral Springs, Fla., about a 45-minute drive north from downtown Miami.
"I like it down here because of things like all the colors and the ethnicity," May-Treanor said. "It's just a much different vibe."
The Miami event will be held next to the AmericanAirlines Arena, home of the NBA champion Miami Heat, and at least two basketball players - one current, one former - will be among the thousands of fans expected by tournament officials.
"I'm a huge fan," said Heat forward Jason Kapono. "I tried to play volleyball. I'm not very good. But it's exciting that it's coming here. I'll be out there. I'm a supporter and a fan."
So, too, is former Heat center Rony Seikaly, who last played in the NBA during the 1998-99 season. Seikaly has entered Friday's qualifying tournament, trying to earn a spot in the men's main draw, and his mere presence gives the field a name that will resonate with the common sports fan.
Meanwhile, May-Treanor may not exactly be a household name among all sports fans. Among anyone who knows volleyball, though, the 5-foot-10 powerhouse is a huge star.
As a setter, she led Long Beach State to the 1998 NCAA championship - with an undefeated record. She was a three-time NCAA first-team All-American, and many thought she was the future on-court leader of the U.S. women's indoor volleyball program.
But she turned to the beach, and the results can't be questioned. She was the fastest American woman ever to win $1 million on the sand, yet acknowledges that the indoor game is still something she holds dear.
"I miss it. I really do miss it," May-Treanor said. "It was just a much different game. When I play beach volleyball, I'm touching the ball every rally. Indoor, as a setter, you're involved in every play but it's kind of a cat-and-mouse game. You're the quarterback, running the team. Outdoor, you're involved in every situation."
And for now, beach volleyball is the right situation.
The AVP is offering $4 million in prize money this year, up $500,000 from a year ago, and is splitting it equally among men's and women's teams. The money is growing because the tour has seen a huge spike in popularity in recent years - with the success of May-Treanor and Walsh perhaps the biggest reason.
"We're definitely on an up-curve because we keep having to add more tournaments throughout the year," May-Treanor said. "People want it. People want it to come to their cities. It's a nice problem to have. It definitely is growing and it will continue to grow."

Former Heat star Seikaly attempts pro beach volleyball
Macau pairs with childhood idol
By Sharon Robb
South Florida Sun-Sentinel
Posted April 12 2007
Miami-born Gaston Macau followed the basketball career of Rony Seikaly even before he was the Miami Heat's first draft pick in 1988.
Seikaly came to Syracuse with no organized basketball experience and left as an All-American. The first-round pick and 1990 NBA Most Improved Player Award winner played with the Heat, Golden State, Orlando and New Jersey Nets.
He was traded by the Heat in November 1994.
"I grew up watching him play basketball and always looked up to him," Macau said.
Macau, one of the state's best beach volleyball players, will literally be looking up to him Friday at Bicentennial Park.
The two are playing together in the qualifier for this weekend's AVP Cuervo Gold Crown Miami Open, the season opener for the pro beach volleyball tour. They are seeded 20th among a field of 50 men's teams featuring several players from Broward and Palm Beach counties. Other top locals trying to qualify are brothers David and Mike DiPierro of Pompano Beach, playing with different partners from California, and Jimmy, Steve and Mark Van Zwieten, also from Pompano Beach and former full-time AVP player Eric Wurts of Fort Lauderdale.
The top four men's and women's teams make it out of the qualifier for Saturday's main draw.
Macau, 32, a former Rutgers standout is a 6-foot-1 scrappy defensive player with a great jump serve. Seikaly, 41, is 6-11 1/2 and is a formidable blocker and intimidating at the net.
Still, the two have yet to play a game together. Seikaly has been training on his own. Macau, a regular at local tournaments in South Florida and AVP qualifier several times in past seasons, said he is in the best shape he has been in three years.
"Can you believe it?" Macau said. "To be able to play with a star that I looked up to as a kid is an opportunity I know I will never have again. I am very excited.
"I am looking to have fun but at the same time I like to compete. Once I get over the whole thing of meeting him and having fun, I want to win."
Seikaly is the tallest player Macau has partnered with.
"By far the tallest ... by about five inches," Macau said. "He is 6-11, it can't be all that bad. I'm just going to try and stay on the court with him.
"I kind of wished I had known a little earlier we were going to be playing together and had set some time aside to practice together. He's been busy with work and didn't have the opportunity. I think we make a pretty good team. I think we can do well."
It is the first of 18 stops on the AVP Crocs Tour that features nine new cities, including Miami and Tampa. After four years, the Fort Lauderdale event was moved to Miami. Truckloads of sand have been brought in to construct eight courts on the grassy park surface.
The Cuervo Gold Crown Series is a competition within a competition. Miami is the first of three AVP events in the series. The others are Arlington, Texas, and Huntington Beach, Calif. Teams are awarded points based on their finishes. The winners receive $100,000 in bonus money.
The area's only full-time AVP players, George Roumain and Nick Lucena, are in the main draw.
Roumain, an Olympian and 2004 AVP Rookie of the Year, played high school at St. Thomas Aquinas and Douglas and grew up in Parkland. Lucena grew up in Davie and played at Western and Florida State. Both live in California, the nation's hotbed for beach volleyball.
The top women's seed is Misty-May Treanor, who splits her time between Coral Springs and California, and Kerri Walsh, the winningest women's team in the sport.
 
NBA star Seikaly takes a shot
Former hoops pro to compete in Miami
By Walter Villa / Special to AVP.com
Rony Seikaly, a starting center for nearly all of his 11-year NBA career, will be the tallest player on the beach this weekend. Just don't expect him to show off his vertical leap.
"I may jump downward," joked Seikaly, who retired from the NBA in 1999 due to a chronic right foot injury. "I have a lot of wear and tear from 18 years of playing basketball."
During his pro basketball career, Seikaly was listed at 6-foot-11 and 245 pounds. Those numbers have changed a bit over the years.
"I may have shrunk an inch since then," Seikaly said with a laugh. "I am about [6-foot-10] or [6-foot-11] and 260 pounds now."
Seikaly, a native of Lebanon who played high school volleyball in Greece, got a call just a few days ago inviting him to compete in the AVP Cuervo Gold Crown Miami Open at Bicentennial Park. Seikaly said he has not played since his days at American Community High in Athens, and he has never played on the beach.
"I told them, 'Sure, I love volleyball. I'll play,'" Seikaly said. "But it's just for fun for me. I haven't trained for it. Had I had four or five weeks to train and get a feel for the sand, I would have more of a competitive feel for the game."
Instead, Seikaly said he will rely on his teammate, Gaston Macau, a 6-foot-1 Miami native, to make him look good when qualifying begins on Friday.
"I'm hoping [Macau] can cover my mistakes," Seikaly said.
Macau, 32, is starting his 11th year as a pro, so he certainly can help Seikaly with ins and (side) outs of the game. But Macau has never had a top-four U.S. finish, and his career earnings are only $9,500, which is the kind of cash you could have found in Seikaly's shirt pocket during his days in the NBA.
Then again, Seikaly, 41, says his appearance this weekend is all about stress relief. He works in the real estate business these days and jogs once or twice a week, trying not to anger his barking foot in the process. He lives in Miami most of the year and has season tickets to the Heat games.
"I paid for those tickets, too," Seikaly pointed out. "They weren't free."
Maybe they should be. After all, Seikaly was the first draft pick in the Heat's history, taken 9th overall in the first round of the 1988 NBA Draft process.
After an excellent career at Syracuse University in which he was second-team All-American as a senior, Seikaly joined the expansion Heat, where he played for six seasons. He was the NBA's Most Improved Player in 1990 and set Heat single-game records for blocks (8), rebounds (34) and free throws made (16).
Seikaly also set a Heat single-season record for rebounds and had 26 performances in which he had at least 20 boards and 20 points in the same game.
"I am proud that I was the Heat's first draft pick, that I was there since their infancy," Seikaly said. "To see them win the NBA title last season with Shaq and D-Wade was great."
Seikaly finished his NBA career playing with Golden State, Orlando and New Jersey and also spent some time competing in Spain for Barcelona. But he said his fondest memories are from his days with the Heat.
"I loved the whole ride," said Seikaly, who averaged 14.7 points and 9.5 rebounds for his NBA career. "When I first got to the States, there really weren't many foreign players in the league. Maybe [center] Rik Smits, who is from Holland and one or two other guys.
"I was one of the first guys, and I wasn't some player who was sitting on a warm bench. I started every single game. Now every team seems to have 2 or 3 international players."
Don't look for Seikaly to start a trend of retired basketball players taking up volleyball.
"I don't mind doing this because I love volleyball," Seikaly said. "But this is not super competitive for me."


Sister Act: The Lindquists
Despite lack of size, siblings up for Tour challenge
By Walter Villa / Special to AVP.com
Katie Lindquist, who teams with her sister Tracy to form one of the top beach volleyball duos in the world, made a startling admission Tuesday night.
"I don't see us ever winning an AVP tournament," Katie said. "Winning would be the ultimate -- the peak of our careers. But it's not why we play. We play for fun. If we saw winning as our main goal, we would have to split up."
Breaking up, both sisters say, is not in their plans. Instead, they will fly from California to Miami late Thursday night to take part in the AVP Cuervo Gold Crown Miami Open at Bicentennial Park.
The sisters, seeded 16th, will play the 17th-seeded pair of Janelle Ruen and Jennifer Snyder on Saturday morning.
Like most of the women on the tour, Ruen (5-foot-10) and Snyder (6-foot-2) tower above the Lindquist sisters, who are both 5-foot-6. The sisters are the shortest team on the beach and the only one which chooses not to block at the net.
"I don't think we have an option," Katie said. "The smart move would be to pair up with a big blocker. But we want to play together."
If the Lindquist sisters can knock off Ruen and Snyder, their task will get much tougher. Their second-round match would be against Misty May-Treanor and Kerri Walsh, who won Olympic Gold medal in 2004 and have been the world's top-ranked duo for four years in a row (2003-2006).
May-Treanor, 5-foot-10, is a great defender and knows the game exceptionally well, according to Katie. Walsh, all 6-foot-3 of her, is "huge" up front.
"Neither has a weakness as far as I can tell," Katie said. "Whatever they think is their weakness is probably better than anyone else's game. Plus, both are really nice girls. They are great for the sport."
So are the Lindquist sisters, who have been playing together on the AVP Tour for the past seven years. Born and raised in California, they were taught the game by their father, Dave, a former player at Southern Cal and a coach at Westminster High in Los Angeles.
Both girls starred at Ocean View High. Katie went on to the University of San Diego, and Tracy won a national championship as a star setter for Southern Cal in 2003.
Although they have never won an AVP tournament, the sisters teamed up to claim the Tel Aviv Open in Israel. In addition, Tracy also teamed with UCLA grad Chrissie Zartman to win the World University Games' first-ever beach volleyball championship in 2002. And Tracy also won two pro tournaments in New Zealand with Claire Robertson and Ashley Ivy, respectively.
But despite her successes with other players, Tracy said she will continue to pair up with her sister.
"We have a good thing going," Tracy said, referring to a pair of 5th-place finishes the past couple of years. "I've thought about [splitting up] in the past, but not anymore. It would be too stressful."
Tracy said she agreed with her sister that winning an AVP tournament together is unlikely -- "the other girls at the top are too big and too strong" -- but her perspective is a bit different.
Katie is a full-time kindergarten teacher at Faylane Elementary in Garden Grove, Calif. Tracy, meanwhile, teaches part-time as a substitute.
"For me, the AVP is about more than just fun," Tracy said. "I still have a dream of winning in the AVP. But Katie has a full-time job, so her perspective may be different."
One thing that cannot be argued is their modest earnings. Katie said she earned just $15,000 playing volleyball last season, and added that she and her sister have to pay their own expenses when they travel.
"We get a lot of one-star hotels," Katie said. "But we have a blast. All the girls hit harder than us, but we try to place the ball in certain spots, have better ball control."
Asked what fans can look forward to in Miami, Tracy said to be ready for excitement.
"The atmosphere is great," she said. "The finals are always packed with fans."
Added Katie: "Once I played beach, I could never go back to the indoor game. It's so much more challenging. Not only do you have more court to cover, you also get to play all the positions. It's a blast."
Win or lose.

Gold medalist May-Treanor watches husband play for Marlins
Associated Press
MIAMI - Despite a busy schedule, Olympic gold medalist Misty May-Treanor was able to watch her husband Matt Treanor play baseball for the Florida Marlins on Wednesday.
May-Treanor, 29, won the gold medal for beach volleyball at the 2004 Summer Olympics in Athens, Greece and is in Miami for the AVP Cuervo Gold Crown Miami Open, April 13-15.
"This is the most I get to see him this season," May-Treanor said. "I would like to come more often because I love the weather and love the diversity. With my schedule it becomes very tough, but I'm glad we have a tournament in Miami."
Treanor will not be able to watch his wife play in Miami because the Marlins head to Atlanta on Thursday for a three-game series with the Braves.
"It would be better if I could see her play, but just being able to see her is a bonus," Treanor said. "A lot of the guys get to go home every day to see their wives. Sometimes I feel cheated that I don't get to go home and see my wife especially if things aren't going well here."
Treanor, 31, has been married to the former Misty May since November 2004 after meeting at the Sports Medicine Institute in Orange, Calif. earlier that year. The two have a house in Coral Springs, Fla., but with their busy schedules they are unable to see each other on a consistent basis.
"When you come off a win, you want to see your significant other because they are your best friend and you want to hang out," said May-Treanor, who talks to her husband up to five times a day. "A lot of times we don't have that luxury so we do make a lot of phone calls."
Treanor, who traveled to Thailand last year to watch his wife play, would like to be there this weekend in the AVP's first event of the 2007 schedule.
"It's terrible to be away from her, but we have gotten used to it," Treanor, who believes trust and communication are the biggest factors in their relationship.
 
A Gorgeous result?
The No. 9 team hopes to outplay its seed
By Walter Villa / Special to AVP.com
The members of Team Gorgeous had a rather unattractive start to their friendship.
Suzanne Stonebarger, 26, and Michelle "Meech" More, 25, the AVP's ninth-ranked women's team, first met on the campus of the University of Nevada at Reno. Stonebarger, a college freshman, served as the host for More, who at the time was a high school senior making a recruiting trip.
"I highlighted her hair that weekend," Stonebarger said, recalling how the fast friends bonded. "I don't know how that happened except that I used to do other girls' hair, too."
The dye job was free -- and it was worth even less than that, according to More.
"It was so bad that I had to go to a hair salon as soon as I got back home," said More, who is from Torrance, Calif. "She put blonde streaks all over the place. I looked like a skunk."
Somehow More's hair survived the trauma, so much so, in fact, that she and Stonebarger earned the "Team Gorgeous" nickname.
The women, who will team up again this weekend at the AVP Cuervo Gold Crown Miami Open at Bicentennial Park, first played together as pros in 2004.
Similar to the hair experiment, it wasn't a pretty sight.
"It was a humbling experience," Stonebarger said. "We didn't know anything about beach volleyball. We tried to have fun. But it's hard to have fun when you aren't very good at what you are doing."
During their rookie season, the duo failed to qualify for the main draw at most of the tournaments they entered.
Despite the losses, the women maintained a great attitude, which impressed the crew and the AVP interns that also work on the tour. The fact that Stonebarger, who is 5-foot-9, and More, who is 6-foot-1, also looked good didn't hurt at all.
"I think the crew started calling us Team Gorgeous as a joke," More said. "We were always really friendly with them because they work so hard and don't ever get recognized. After that, the interns started calling us gorgeous, too."
Added Stonebarger, "We might have sucked that first year, but they loved us. But we don't take the nickname seriously."
During their matches, More said another nickname would be more appropriate.
"We call ourselves "Team Torn Up," More said with a laugh. "When we are playing, we are sweating, we have sand all over our bodies and our hair is a mess."
The women clean up well, however.
"We're both real girly-girly," More said. "We were in the AVP calendar last year and don't mind modeling as long as it is connected to our sport. We like to promote fitness and being in shape."
Their fitness might be a shock to anyone who has seen them devour a meal, More said.
"We both love to eat," she said. "My favorite is Mexican food. I can eat it three times a day -- chips, salsa, burritos, tacos -- it's all good."
But even though the women like their food and love to have a good time, don't misunderstand: they are very serious about beach volleyball.
"When we were rookies," Stonebarger said, "we were always eliminated early and we would go party. But now we wait until Sunday night to party."
Both women say their goal this weekend is to finish higher than their team's No. 9 seeding.
"Realistically," Stonebarger said, "we would love to get to the semifinals."
That would be, both agree, gorgeous.
 
Miami to kick off tour season
Misty and Karch top storylines for coming season
By Robert Falkoff / AVP.com
The curtain goes up on the 2007 AVP Crocs Tour on Friday in Miami with Misty May-Treanor and Karch Kiraly providing much of the drama.
Can May-Treanor and partner Kerri Walsh start their season with a flourish, moving May-Treanor one step closer to the all-time women's record of 72 victories? Can Kiraly, at 46, turn back the clock in the first of the 11 events he will play in his farewell season?
For those fans who make their way to Bicentennial Park for the $200,000 Miami Open, the answers to those questions and the overall competition at the start of a new season should make for an intriguing weekend.
May-Treanor is just three victories away from Holly McPeak's record of 72 wins. May-Treanor could move a step closer to that mark and also set the tone for another dominating year if she and Walsh pick up where they left off last season. But May-Treanor isn't expecting victories to come easily in '07.
"I think it is going to be difficult this year," May-Treanor said. "Everybody is gunning for us."
May-Treanor and Walsh have the No. 1 seed in the main draw but could face a serious challenge from the second-seeded team of Elaine Youngs and Nicole Branagh. Youngs and Branagh are the elite power servers on the Tour and Youngs recently expressed confidence that their game should match up well against May-Treanor and Walsh.
The Annett Davis/Jenny Johnson duo drew the No. 3 seed and the new combo of Tyra Turner/Rachel Wacholder is seeded fourth. Wacholder experienced victory over May-Treanor/Walsh when previously teamed with Youngs.
McPeak is paired with Logan Tom as the No. 6 seed and anticipates spirited competition in the '07 premiere. In addition to all the teams hoping for a big start on the AVP Tour, McPeak notes that the ramifications for 2008 Olympic Games qualification will also factor into this year's competition level.
"Everybody is going to be pushing each other to try and get those two Olympic spots," McPeak said.
The start of Kiraly's farewell tour will add a dose of rich nostalgia to the south Florida weekend. The winner of 148 tournaments and a three-time Olympic gold medalist, Kiraly figures to be the sentimental favorite wherever he goes.
Kiraly, who will team with Kevin Wong as the No. 10 seed, looks at the top three seeds in Miami as especially formidable challenges. Mike Lambert and Stein Metzger are seeded No. 1 with Phil Dalhausser and Todd Rogers in the No. 2 slot and Jake Gibb and Sean Rosenthal seeded third.
"Certainly, Todd and Phil had the best season last year, so they have to be favorites going in this year," Kiraly said. "Stein and Mike had a great season, too. Jake and Sean were surprising in only winning the first tournament and not winning again, but they've had some good success on foreign soil. All three of those teams are really strong and also are vying for the Olympic berths on the men's side. So, it should be an interesting year."
Rogers and Dalhausser won eight AVP events in 2006 and Rogers is cautious about not letting expectations get out of control this season.
"The major thing for Phil and me is having a realistic perspective," Rogers said.
Following this weekend's tournament, the AVP Crocs Tour moves on to Dallas for a four-day event beginning April 19.

Enjoying the riches: AVP Tour gets lucrative
The growth of the Crocs AVP Tour means its star volleyball players no longer need to hold down part-time jobs to support their athletic careers.
BY MANNY NAVARRO
mnavarro@MiamiHerald.com
 
 Audio | AVP player Kerri Walsh
 Audio | AVP player Jake Gibb
 Audio | AVP player Phil "The Thin Beast" Dalhausser
 Audio | AVP Commissioner Leonard Armato
IF YOU GO

• What: The AVP Cuervo Gold Crown Miami Open.
• When, where: Today-Sunday. Bicentennial Park, 1075 Biscayne Blvd, Miami.
• Schedule: Today -- Qualifying, 8 a.m.-6 p.m. Saturday -- Main draw, 9 a.m.-6 p.m. Sunday -- Main draw, 8 a.m.-1 p.m.; men's final, 2:30 p.m.; women's final, 4 p.m.
• Who: More than 150 of the top professional beach volleyball athletes will compete in the event, which has kicked off the AVP Tour and has been held in Fort Lauderdale the past four seasons. Among the featured stars: the Olympic gold medal-winning team of Misty May-Treanor and Kerri Walsh and the legendary Karch Kiraly, who will be retiring after this season.
• Tickets: $10 students/youth; $20 general admission; $40 courtside seating.
Before he became known as The Thin Beast, Phil Dalhausser was just Phil, the 6-9 skinny guy who painted houses in the offseason and chased a dream.
The same could be said for Jake Gibb, whose family lived off the money his wife earned from two jobs while he trained to become a full-time professional beach volleyball player.
Today, Dalhausser and Gibb play for the top men's two-man teams in the country and don't need to depend on odd jobs or family to survive. They are enjoying the riches of the growing Crocs AVP Tour, which begins its new season this weekend with the Cuervo Gold Crown Miami Open at Bicentennial Park.
The event, which will take place near AmericanAirlines Arena, will feature three-time Olympic gold medalist Karch Kiraly and the 2004 Olympic women's gold-medal winning tandem of Misty May-Treanor and Kerri Walsh. Even former Heat center Rony Seikaly will play in Friday's qualifying round, hoping to reach Saturday's main draw.
But for Gibb and Dalhausser, whose teams could face each other in Sunday's final, their new lives are a testament to the growth of the tour.
''The sport is really growing, thanks to people like Karch and Misty and Kerri -- especially after they won gold,'' said Gibb, 31, who teamed with Sean Rosenthal to win last year's AVP Tour-opening event in Fort Lauderdale.
``Right now, I'm one of the lucky ones because the top 10, 12 teams can do this for a living, thanks to good sponsors. But I hope [our sport] gets to the point where our 32nd team is making a living and does not have to have a second job.''
It is getting there. While some players on the tour on the bottom part of the money list still work odd jobs as bartenders or waiters to make ends meet, many top players can afford to focus on volleyball full-time because the sport's popularity is growing and sponsorship is up.
RAPID RISE
According to Scarsborough Sports Marketing, the tour increased its fan base more than 53 percent in the past two years -- the fastest of any sport in the country. This year, the tour has $4 million in prize money, up $500,000 from 2006 and more than $3 million more since 2001, when Leonard Armato became commissioner.
''In the past five years, we've grown dramatically,'' Armato said. ``. . . We've gone from eight to 10 events to 18 events in major markets. We went from regional TV to nine events on NBC.
``I think the sport has an opportunity to grow and become incredibly popular over time because it combines two great things everybody wants right now. It has athletes that compete fiercely in a sport everybody has played before and then it has [an] infectious lifestyle, this beach party that involves competition. And that's what people want today, a full entertainment experience.''
WELCOME CHANGE
This weekend's event is one of the richest all season and the first of three AVP events in the Cuervo Gold Crown series -- the others are Dallas and Huntington Beach, Calif. Winners will receive roughly $100,000 in bonus money.
A decade ago, the AVP was crumbling under financial strain.
''That's probably the most money for a single event since like the early 1990s,'' said Dalhausser, 27, who was named the world's top blocker last season after winning a league-leading eight events with teammate and 2006 MVP Todd Rogers. ``Everyone is going to be ready to go all out.''

AVP Miami Open a real family affair
By Sharon Robb
South Florida Sun-Sentinel
Posted April 13 2007
MIAMI · Brothers Jim, Steve and Mark Van Zwieten of Pompano Beach will play in today's qualifier for the $200,000 AVP Cuervo Gold Crown Miami Open at Bicentennial Park.
Jim Van Zwieten, 29, and his wife, Franci, are expecting their first child in early May.
LocalLinks
"She is on her own if she goes into labor early," Steve said.
It will be the fifth time Jim and Steve Van Zwieten, 22, play together in an AVP qualifier. Seeded 16th, they play No. 45 seeds Andreas Olesen and Teddy Cook of Fort Lauderdale in their first match.
Mark Van Zwieten, 19, will play with Keawe Adolpho, 20, of Coconut Creek. The two are seeded No. 31. Brothers Mike and David DiPierro of Pompano Beach are playing with different partners from California.
Fortunately for the players' families, all longtime friends, the players are in different brackets and will not play against each other unless they qualify for Saturday's main draw. The top four men's and women's teams in the qualifier advance.
"That's what we're planning on, to play each other in the main draw," Steve Van Zwieten said.
Other locals competing in today's qualifier:
PlayerCityDana Camacho Lauderdale- by-the-SeaGaston Macau Miami BeachRony Seikaly MiamiWayne Holly Fort Lauderdale Tyler Lesneski West Palm BeachCraig Demott Miami BeachJerod Davis Deerfield BeachAndre Melo Deerfield BeachKevin Craig Deerfield BeachEric Wurts Fort LauderdaleTeddy Cook Fort LauderdaleCapri Hilgendorf West Palm BeachBonnie Levin MiamiTeri Van Dyke Coconut Creek Kendra Jackson Coral Springs
 
Former Heat standout Seikaly tries beach volleyball
The Associated Press
MIAMI
Former NBA center Rony Seikaly tried a new sport - briefly.
Seikaly and teammate Gaston Macau were eliminated in the first round of qualifying for a pro beach volleyball event Friday. The duo lost 21-9, 21-18 to Craig Demott and Dameon Holmquist - meaning the longtime Miami Heat center won't be in the men's draw for the AVP Cuervo Gold Crown Miami Open this weekend.
Seikaly said he last played volleyball 27 years ago in high school, and never on sand.
"I'm in shape, but this is different," Seikaly said. "The sand makes a difference."
Seikaly, the first draft pick in Heat history, still lives in Miami. He blocked two kill attempts by Demott early in the match and easily pounding several winners to the sand - but he also struggled at times, even whiffing on one spike attempt.
Still, Seikaly earned raves.
"I've honestly never seen a guy pick up the game so fast," Macau said. "He is a talent, very athletic."
The tournament begins in earnest on Saturday, with beach volleyball headliners like Karch Kiraly and the women's team of Misty May-Treanor and Kerri Walsh in the field.
"I'm happy," Seikaly said. "I wish I would have played a few more times before we got in to the tournament. But I had a good time."

Gibb eyes more than title
AVP star wants mainstream attention for sport
By Walter Villa / AVP.com
Growing up in Bountiful, Utah, Jake Gibb thought volleyball was a "girls' sport.''
He was wrong, of course. He said he found out relatively late -- he took up the sport at age 21 -- that volleyball is hard-hitting and fast-paced game for men and women.
And now that he is an outstanding pro beach volleyball player, Gibb can't understand why more Americans haven't made the same discovery.
"It's an incredible sport," said Gibb, who will compete this weekend in the AVP Cuervo Gold Crown Miami Open at Bicentennial Park. "It's growing, and I hope even more people find out how exciting and athletic the game is."
Asked why his sport is not featured regularly on ESPN's SportsCenter, Gibb used sarcasm to make a point.
"SportsCenter has really important things to show like darts, scrabble, ping pong," Gibb said at Thursday night's AVP party inside Miami Beach's Victor Hotel.
Turning serious, Gibb added: "I don't know, man. I think we should be on there."
If they were, more sports fans would know that Gibb and Sean Rosenthal won last year's South Florida AVP stop and are teaming up again this year to bid for a repeat.
But it's not just ESPN that seems asleep at the wheel. Newspapers don't give beach volleyball the coverage allowed for other sports.
"There is no reason why it shouldn't be covered more," Rosenthal said. "It's an Olympic sport. Plus, it's great for TV. There are half-naked guys and girls out there. We have great athletes on the tour, and they should be recognized more than they are."
Gibb, who is 6-foot-7, is one of the only players on the AVP tour who did not play college volleyball.
"I loved basketball as a kid," said Gibb, who was a shooting guard/small forward. "That was my passion. But once I realized I wasn't going to play D-1 basketball, I said, hey, let me try something else. So I started playing volleyball in my backyard, and I fell in love with it."
Gibb proved to be a natural. He won his first AVP title in 2004, taking the Austin Open with Adam Jewell.
After that, Gibb started to dominate. Playing with three different partners, he has made it to 16 finals in the past 3 years, winning six. He is the only player to finish ranked in the top five in each of the past three seasons, and he was the AVP's Most Valuable Player in 2005.
Last year, he teamed up with Rosenthal, winning the tour stop in Fort Lauderdale, Fl., and making five other finals. Now they are back in South Florida.
"We're excited," said Gibb, the youngest of 11 children, including twin brother Coleman. "It's always good coming in knowing you can win. Sometimes you have places where you say, 'I can never play well here.' But we both play well here."
Rosenthal, who is 6-foot-4 and a native of Redondo Beach, Calif., said he is enjoying his partnership with Gibb, 31.
"Jake is so versatile," said Rosenthal, 26. "He makes us a good defensive team because of how well he blocks. He is also a great server. There really isn't anything he doesn't do well."

Miami herd thinned in qualies
By Mike Scarr / AVP.com
MIAMI -- The local pair had the crowd behind them but a dash out of the first round and into the weekend proved too tough a distance.
Mark Van Sweiten and Keawe Adolpho nearly sprinted out of the qualifying round of the Cuervo Gold Miami Open on Friday afternoon but fell a step short, falling 18-21, 25-23, 15-11, to Billy Allen and A.J. Mihalic in the last match of the day.
Van Sweiten and Adolpho drew up the story line and nearly delivered by adding a significant rooting interest for the main weekend draw but still discovered a fair measure of themselves as players on the big stage.
"I definitely think we accomplished something," Adolpho said. "It was our first time playing together in a qualifier, and for us, being two short guys from Florida, it was a big tournament for us."
All four qualifiers into the weekend came out of Friday's top 10 seeds.
The top-seeded team of Albert Hennemann and Ed Ratledge advanced without losing a game. Also advancing were Mike Morrison and Ty Tramblie as well as the team of Mike DiPierro and Ran Kumgisky.
In the top of the bracket, Hennemann and Ratledge advanced easily, opening with a 21-11, 21-14 victory over Tim Church and Ryan Cronin. After dispatching Jim and Steve Van Zweiten, Mark's brothers, in the third round, Hennemann and Ratledge defeated John Moran and Brad Torsone, 21-19, 21-17, to earn a berth in the main draw.
"Qualifiers are never fun," Hennemann said. "Late Monday I was informed that we'd been pushed into the qualifier and I was not happy with that decision, but we knew we had to take care of business and get out of the qualifier."
Morrison and Tramblie also did not lose a game Friday. They followed their second-round victory over William Chenoweth and Guy Hamilton with a pair of hard-fought wins, a 21-18, 22-20 edge over Chris Harger and Justin Phipps and a 22-20, 21-18 victory over Ben Koski and Jeff Minc.
"Every single game in this qualifier you want to win and at the end," Morrison said. "(Tramblie) had a couple of digs, and I had a couple of blocks and that was the difference at the end, a couple of blocks and a couple of digs."
Morrison said that he and his partner will be looking to make some noise on the weekend.
"In these draws of 24 teams it is a lot harder than the big 32-team draws at the beaches because they're only taking four teams out of 50 so it's very difficult," Morrison said. "We're just stoked; we're happy. We want to do better than a 17th."
In the early going Adolpho and Van Zwieten built some momentum by upsetting the second-seeded duo of Jeff Carlucci and Adam Roberts.
Following a first-round win over Jake Blair and Erik Laverdiere, 21-14, 21-12 that took 38 minutes, Adolpho and Van Zwieten used an aggressive serve to upend Carlucci and Roberts, a team that never quite appeared in sync Friday afternoon.
"We just know each other really well and we've been playing well together lately," Van Zwieten said of Adolpho. "I think we also had some momentum after playing earlier in the day. It was their first game."
Adolpho and Van Zwieten then defeated Dana Camacho and Pete DiVenere, 21-18, 18-21, 15-8 to get to the one of qualifying finals.
In another second-round upset, the unseeded team of Tyler Lesneski and Jeff Soler took out Kevin Dake and Lucas Wisniakowski, the No. 9 seed in the men's qualifying tournament. Dake and Wisniakowski received a first-round bye but Lesneski and Soler followed up their opening round victory over Yariv Lerner and Rob McNaughton with a 21-18, 21-16 win in the second round to advance.
The 10th seeded team of Jon Mesko and Leonardo Moraes squandered a bye into the second round by dropping their match to Danko Iordanov and Monte Tucker, 21-12, 19-21, 15-13. Iordanov and Tucker advanced to play Allen and Mihalic in the third round but would go no further.
All four of Friday's qualifying teams are required to play an extra day while the top pros automatically advance to the weekend. Some players see it as a plus.
"To be honest, it is great for our momentum," Hennemann said. "There two ways to look at it. Either you get upset or you get fired up about it and you play well and take it right into tomorrow so I think it is a big advantage for us in the first tournament when no other team has played yet and we have three matches under our belt."
 
Seikaly goes from hardwood to sand
Former NBA star loses in beach volleyball debut
By Walter Villa / AVP.com
MIAMI -- For his first volleyball match in nearly three decades -- and his first ever on sand -- former NBA star Rony Seikaly wasn't bad at all.
Seikaly, 41, teamed Friday with 11-year veteran Gaston Macau in the AVP Miami Open. The newly formed duo lost, 21-8, 21-18, to Craig Demott and Dameon Holmquist in the first round of qualifying.
Despite the loss, Seikaly earned rave reviews.
"I've honestly never seen a guy pick up the game so fast," Macau said. "He is a talent, very athletic."
Seikaly said he last played volleyball 27 years ago on hard courts at American Community High School in Athens, Greece.
"The sand makes this a different aerobic exercise," said Seikaly, who is 6-foot-11 and 260 pounds. "I'm in shape, but this is definitely different."
Seikaly looked good early, blocking the first two shots that came his way. He struggled at times with his timing, whiffing on a spike attempt and mis-hitting some other balls. But he also crushed some winners.
"It was weird," Holmquist said. "One play he would put the ball down, and the next time the ball was up in the air."
Part of the problem was that Seikaly and Macau had only one practice together before Friday's match.
"It was tough in the beginning," Macau said, referring to the lopsided score of the first set. "We had never played together before, and he hadn't played in a while. If we played one more match after this, he'd be that much better."
That "one more match" almost happened as Seikaly and Macau each put down spikes to bring their team to within 19-18 in the second set. Macau's spike was set up by a diving dig by Seikaly in what was perhaps the best point of the match.
But after a Seikaly block went out of bounds to make it 20-18, Demott hit a winner deep in the right corner to earn the victory.
"If we had lost this match," Holmquist said with a smile, "we would have never heard the end of it. But Rony did a great job. With a little bit of coaching, he could be a really good player."
Rony got some quality coaching on Friday by two of the top women's players in the world, Suzanne Stonebarger and Michelle More, otherwise known as "Team Gorgeous."
At one point, Stonebarger urged Macau to be more vocal, saying: "You need to be the leader, you need to talk more."
Seikaly, who said all along he was playing for fun, joked: "Just don't talk to me while I'm serving."
Macau said his strategy with Seiklay was just to "get the ball over the net and play defense."
Holmquist, playing against the tallest player he has ever faced and the tallest in this weekend's tournament, also had a plan.
"With Rony's height, you either have to hit really high or hit around him," Holmquist said. "I think what worked best was to hit around him."
That plan ruined Seikaly's debut. Seikaly, though, did not sound too disappointed.
"I'm happy," he said. "I wish we had played a few more times before we got into the tournament. But I had a good time."
Walter Villa is a contributor to AVP.com.

Olympic medalist Kiraly to play AVP Louisville Open
Business First of Louisville - April 13, 2007
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Olympic gold-medal winner Karch Kiraly will compete in the AVP Louisville Open on Memorial Day weekend, May 24 to 27.
The AVP Louisville Open is a stop on the AVP Crocs Tour, a national professional beach volleyball tour. The Louisville event will take place on Festival Plaza at Waterfront Park.
This will be Kiraly's last season as a player on the tour. He won Olympic gold medals in 1984, 1988 and 1996, and was inducted into the Volleyball Hall of Fame in 2001.
The AVP Louisville Open is being produced by SFX Worldwide, a sports marketing company owned by Louisville-based private equity firm Blue Equity LLC, and Cincinnati-based event promoter Reach Event Marketing, in connection with AVP Inc., a Los Angeles-based company that produces and markets professional beach volleyball events.
Tickets can be purchased online through www.mustseeavp.com or www.tickets.com, or by phone at (800) 280-2330. General admission tickets are $15, and courtside box seats are $35 (with discounts for students, children and seniors). The May 24 qualifying round is free.

The sand to heat up on Saturday
Locals, legends dot the docket on Saturday
By Colleen Murray / AVP.com
For first-timers at an AVP event, there's an abundance of games, activities and tents giving away goodies. There is a lot to process, even for natives of a city known to bustle. In looking at the games on tap for Saturday, locals and legends hope to be the main attraction on Saturday.
Season-long storylines:
Miami marks the beginning of the last season for the legendary Karch Kiraly. The 46-year-old has earned a staggering 144 victories and is playing this year with former partner Kevin Wong. The two begin their tournament against qualifiers Mike Morrison and Ty Tramblie.
Misty May-Treanor, a Florida resident, is honing in on surpassing Holly McPeak's career record for titles. May-Treanor is 11 titles away from McPeak's 53-win record. May-Treanor and Kerri Walsh start the tournament on Saturday against the winner of the Janelle Ruen/Jennifer Snyder vs. Katie Lindquist/Tracy Lindquist game.
Opening event streak
Jake Gibb has won the last two opening events. Gibb took the 2005 Fort Lauderdale Open with Stein Metzger and the 2006 Fort Lauderdale Open with current partner Sean Rosenthal. Gibb is looking to make the Miami Open his third opening victory in a row. The two will start off the weekend against the winner of the match between Eric Fonoimoana/Chad Turner and Adam Jewell/Jose Loiola.
Floridians
Another draw to Miami is the Florida husband and wife pair, Chad and Tyra Turner. The Fort Myers Beach, Fla., couple is playing in its first AVP event at the same time since 2005. The next year, an ankle injury sidelined the 6-foot-6 University of South Florida product. Upon his return, Chad is partnered with Olympic gold medalist Eric Fonoimoana.
Formerly Tyra Harper, the 6-foot-1 University of Central Florida alum will be playing for the first time with Rachel Wacholder.
Two other Central Florida Golden Knights will be seeing some home-state action as well. Former partners Nick Lucena and Phil Dalhausser are starting off at opposite ends of the bracket in Miami. The 16th-seeded team of Lucena and Will Strickland will face Brad Keenan and John Mayer on Saturday morning, while second-seeded Dalhausser and Todd Rogers start off their weekend in a second-round match-up against the winner of the Brent Doble/Ty Loomis and Austin Rester/Aaron Wachtfogel face-off.
Newbies
Of the top eight women's teams, only two -- Misty May-Treanor/Kerri Walsh and Annett Davis/Jenny Johnson Jordan -- began the 2006 season as partners. The Miami tournament will show what the other teams look like with some over-the-summer practice under their belts.
Including the qualifiers, of the 69 men's teams, 48 are new partnerships. The top three seeds -- Mike Lambert/Stein Metzger, Phil Dalhausser/Todd Rogers and Jake Gibb/Sean Rosenthal -- are returning partnerships, however.
Match to watch for: Holly McPeak/Logan Tom vs. Jennifer Boss/April Ross.
Although the players couldn't decide who the better rookie was, April Ross and Logan Tom, the co-Rookies of the Year may be able to decide it on the court in the second round.
Jennifer Boss was originally slated to play with Ross's former partner Keao Burdine. With Burdine not yet back from Puerto Rico, Boss is playing with Burdine's former partner April Ross. All three women are University of Southern California graduates.
McPeak and Tom finished the year out together last year and hope to start off strong. If Boss and Ross can get past qualifiers and Florida natives Tara Kuk and Kim Whitney in the first round, Boss and Tom can battle it out to shake any notion of a sophomore slump.

The women pare down their ranks
Locals made a mark on qualifying day
By Colleen Murray / AVP.com
With a full day of play and struggle for the right to compete against the big dogs, qualifiers earning a spot in the main draw always feel relieved and happy to make it. But qualifying in Miami was extra special for Florida natives Kim Whitney and Tara Kuk. The two played in four events together and made the main draw in all of them, but Miami marked the first time the two, as partners, earned their way into the main draw in their home state.
"This is awesome being a Florida team," Kuk said.
The two live in Clearwater, but the cooler temperatures of that Gulf Coast city, about five hours from Miami, did not give them the weather-worn advantage that one might expect.
"It's been rainy and cool. So we've had a day or two like this, but everyone has had none. There were times where I was like, I might throw up," Kuk said of the humidity.
"The heat was definitely a factor," Whitney said. "You just got to feel the heaviness in your breathing and stay calm and focused," Whitney said.
Whitney and Kuk, the highest-ranking all-Florida team in the qualifier, defeated 11th-seeded qualifier Iwona Lodzik and Kristin Ursillo in two games (21-17, 21-13) to earn their way to Saturday play.
Do they feel any pressure matching up against main draw, 11th-seeded team Jennifer Boss and April Ross?
"No, that's why we work so hard, that's why we train so hard, to make it to the main draw," Kuk said.
Preston and Van Fleet played in the last four AVP events together last year and earned two 17th-place finishes and two 25th-place finishes.
Van Fleet's victory has a tinge of the same sweetness as Kuk and Whitney's. Van Fleet's hometown is Tampa, Fla. In order to compete in the main draw, Van Fleet had to square off against her former partner Suzana Manole. Van Fleet and Manole played in 15 events together and placed as high as 17th. The two scored seven 17th-place finishes together.
But Van Fleet had the home state energy on her side. In the final women's match of the day, she and Preston won in three games (21-15, 21-23, 15-13) against Manole and Mills.
Preston and Van Fleet's hard-earned victory landed them in a match-up against 10th-seeded Jennifer Fopma and Stacy Rouwenhorst.
Top-seeded qualifiers Claire Robertson and Julie Romais made it to the main draw by defeating ninth-seeded Dana Schilling and Alicia Zamparelli in two games (21-15, 21-18).
In their five AVP events together last year, Robertson and Romais notched three 17th-place finishes. Roberson and Romais will face Alicia Polzin and Paula Roca in the first round.
In the final women's qualifier seventh-seeded Suzana Manole/Lauren Mills went up against second-seeded Cinta Preston/Beth Van Fleet .
Despite being Friday the 13th, today seemed like it could be a lucky day for fourth-seeded qualifiers Courtney Guerra and Chrissie Zartman. April 13 is Guerra's birthday and the birthday of Zartman's mother, former beach volleyball player Sharkie Zartman's, as well.
But Sarah Dukes and Jill Changaris had their own occasion to commemorate. Miami marked the first tournament that the two Northern California natives played in together. Although they practice in cool Santa Barbara, Calif., temperatures, the two adjusted and defeated Zartman and Guerra in two games (21-12, 21-15).
"It's a little hot and humid out here, but I didn't think it affected us too badly," Dukes said.
This is the second qualification for Dukes, and immediately after the victory over Guerra and Zartman, Dukes headed to tell her family the good news.
"My family is really supportive, they are trying to follow along online at home," Dukes said.
Changaris attributed part of their strong performance to training in the off-season.
Dukes and Changaris will face ninth-seeded "Team Gorgeous" Michelle More/Suzanne Stonebarger in their first-round match.
Of the teams that prevailed to Saturday play, Dukes and Changaris were the only ones who had to play three games. The top four seeds automatically advanced to the second round.
After a tough day in the heat, how do the qualifiers try to prepare for the big-time action?
Sara Dukes knows what she is going to do.
"I just wanna go home, have a good dinner, go to bed early and come out fired up."

AVP, Speedo heat up South Beach
New beach-inspired line unveiled on Friday night
By Monique Moyal / AVP.com
Miami's South Beach got a little bit hotter Thursday night when Speedo and the AVP kicked off their first party of the weekend to begin the official 2007 beach volleyball season.
The festivities at Hotel Victor in South Beach, an intimate boutique-style location, set the stage for Speedo to debut its new line of AVP-inspired beach and active wear in front of over 350 fans, supporters, players and media members.
"Speedo is working with AVP for this new AVP line inspired by the style of the AVP combined with Speedo's expertise on the technical aspect of merchandising for sports," said Laisee Rinteel, Speedo's athlete coordinator and beach volleyball manager. "So the combination came up with this new line and it will be sold in stores across the country, on SpeedoUSA.com, on AVP.com and obviously in the merchandise booths on site this year."
Speedo brought in its seven sponsored athletes to gain some of their input and feedback when creating the line, and the 30 looks were received with such enthusiasm last night that players are ready to sport their new looks on the courts of Miami this weekend.
The party began earlier in the night and gave everyone in attendance the first real chance to get excited for the 2007 season. Around 10 p.m., models picked by Ocean Drive strutted their stuff to provide the highlight of the night.
The different looks of Speedo and the AVP this year will feature sweatshirts, zip-ups, bikinis and volley shorts. Wilson volleyballs will also be sold in the official Speedo merchandise tent on site, along with Banana Boat sunscreen, AVP bags and hats, and as in 2006, Crocs is the title sponsor and the official footwear of the tour.
So fans of the AVP now have the chance to wear the same line and articles of clothing as Kerri Walsh, Todd Rogers or Jake Gibb do when they're in action on the sand.
Look no further than www.avp.com or the next AVP event in your hometown.

Minority growth strong in AVP
Tour hopes to become more diverse as popularity grows
By Walter Villa / AVP.com
While a great majority of the players on the AVP Tour are white, minorities are making significant contributions to the beach game.
Among the minorities playing in this weekend's ATV Cuervo Gold Crown Miami Open at Bicentennial Park are Dain Blanton and Eric Fonoimoana, who teamed up in 2000 to win Olympic gold.
Fonoimoana, 37, and his cousin, Albert Hannenmann, 36, are Samoans who are doing their part to bring volleyball to the inner city by creating Dig For Kids, a non-profit organization based in Carson, Calif. The program - which is free to the kids - stresses academics along with volleyball.
Hannenmann is confident his foundation - which works with fourth- and fifth-graders - will significantly help increase the number of minority kids who play beach volleyball.
"It's going to change," he said. "You are going to see it. We have been doing this for seven years now. So you've got to think a lot of those kids are now turning 16 and 17 years old. We're going to continue to do this, and you are going to see a lot of kids, especially from Carson.
"We have a lot of the kids on the high school team who are playing beach in all the amatuer tournaments. It's so cool to see."
Hannenmann and Fonoimoan are not the only pioneers in the game. Blanton, 35, who led Pepperdine to a national title in 1992. In 1997, became the first black player to win a major beach volleyball event, taking the AVP Hermosa Grand Slam.
Then there are the Wong brothers, who are Chinese-American. Kevin, 34, is playing this weekend with legendary Karch Kiraly. Before that, Kevin's claims to fame were nailing a perfect score on the math portion of his SAT test and also being named to People Magazine's 50 Most Beautiful People list in 2000.
He also won two national titles while at UCLA, and placed fifth in the 2000 Olympics while paired with Rob Heidger.
Scott, 28, a three-time All-American at Pepperdine University, played for the U.S. in the 2001 World University Games. Scott gives back to the game by serving as an assistant at Pepperdine and also coaching at Oaks Christian High School.
Kiraly, who serves as one of the league's top spokesmen because of his star status and thoughtful perspective, said he doesn't think it is vital for his sport to find an equivalent to golf's Tiger Woods or tennis' Serena Williams.
"I don't see it is super important because I don't think of people in terms of their race," Kiraly said. "Dain Blanton is an incredible player. who just happens to have darker skin than many of the rest of us.
"Havng said that, we'd love to have more of the great athletes that we know exist in the inner city be a part of our tour. That's why we do our free clinics. But this game just hasn't caught the public's attention like the NBA, the NFL and Major League Baseball."
On the women's side of the tour, there are also star players who just happen to be minorities, including Logan Tom, Annett Davis and Jenny Johnson Jordan.
Tom, who has Chinese ancestry, was a four-time All-American at Stanford and was twice named the National Player of the Year. She was also the MVP of the NCAA Final four in 2001, when Stanford won a national championship. In 2000, at age 19, she was on the U.S. national indoor team that finished fourth in the Olympics.
Davis and Jordan, both 33, teamed up to pull one of the biggest upsets in the sport's history, knocking off Misty May Treanor and Kerri Walsh last year, ending their 89-match winning streak. Davis and Jordan also teamed up to finish fifth in the 2000 Olympics.
Davis, who has two children, is married to Byron, a 12-time All-American swimmer. Davis' father is Cleveland Buckner, a former NBA standout who played in the historic game in which Wilt Chamberlain set the single-game scoring record with 100 points.
Jordan, who also has two children, is married to Kevin, a former UCLA wide receiver. Jordan's father, Rafer Johnson, won a decathlon gold medal in the 1960 Olympics.
"They have been a great team," Kiraly said of the tour's top black players. "Again, I don't think of them in terms of skin color. They are just absolutely awesome role models for young women in terms of being really nice people, great wives and great mothers.
"They took a year off twice now, four years apart to have kids. Great competitors and just the two sweetest people you will ever meet."
Still, though, Kiraly would like to see more minorities in the women's game.
"It has always baffled me why there aren't more women's minorities in the beach game," he said. "In the men's game, to get players, we have to compete with the NBA offering $15 million contracts. That doesn't exist out here. And there are no inner-city beach volleyball courts. But there are parks with a basket in every city in the country. So there are just many more opportunities to play basketball.
"But on the women's side, in the college game, every race and ethnicity is really well represented. There are tremendous athletes out there, and it baffles me how few of them have the nerve to come out here and give beach volleyball a try.
"There are about 4,500 full scholarships for women to play college volleyball in this country versus about 90 for the men. And even with all those thousands of scholarships given out to the women, we have more men than women at every qualifier on our tour.
"I don't know if they think they can't play beach volleyball or are intimidate or scared to look silly for a while. So the sport is very diverse for the girls in juniors, high school and college - just not on the beach."

Mayer/Keenan learn valuable lessons
Young duo bonds with champions in offseason
By Colleen Murray / AVP.com
In their second-round match in Miami, the faces that John Mayer and Brad Keenan saw across the net looked very familiar. After defeating Nick Lucena and Will Strickland (18-21, 21-17, 15-13) in the first round, Mayer and Keenan earned a match against Stein Metzger and Mike Lambert, with whom Mayer and Keenan traveled to Hawaii to play in the off-season. The faces may have been familiar but the scene for the face-off in Florida was a little more comforting than that in Hawaii.
"The place that we played most of the time was in a cage. It was like a big cage with two courts and like a baby court," Mayer said. "It's called the Outrigger Canoe Club. It's where Stein and Lambert grew up playing. It's like they had some sort of voodoo going on."
The court may have been neutral in Florida, but the Crocs Cup champions' "voodoo" carried over from Hawaii. Lambert, celebrated his 33rd birthday on Saturday, and Metzger took the match in two games, 21-17 and 21-10. Although Mayer and Keenan couldn't defeat their practice partners, it didn't take away from their fond memories of the Aloha State.
"We just had the ultimate trip, we played volleyball, and then, after, we ate," Mayer said. "We were in Hawaii, you know?"
Their Hawaiian vacation epitomizes what Keenan and Mayer are bringing to the beach. Their youthful energy -- Keenan is 25 and Mayer is 24 -- merged with a strong work ethic has helped the Pepperdine grads rise from qualifiers to main draw staples in only a season.
In Hawaii, Mayer and Keenan also seized the opportunity to learn from Metzger and Lambert. During their two weeks there, Mayer and Keenan filmed themselves playing for the first time, so they could see what they needed to work on.
"We just filmed every day and the first week, we were just terrible," Mayer said. "We were like, 'Wow, we suck at volleyball. What are we doing?'"
Luckily for Keenan and Mayer, there were other players on the tape: Metzger and Lambert.
"We watched Stein and Lambo and we were like, 'Oh, that's how we do it.' Then we started to make those adjustments, after that we watched film every night," Mayer said.
Some of the major adjustments made involved improving ball control and increasing the amount of setting and passing.
At the end of last season, Brad Keenan foresaw passing as being an issue to work on.
"I wish I knew how to pass (when I first started)," Keenan said then. "I went through college in the middle so I never really knew."
Keenan and Mayer started training together in January, but Keenan spent time before that on his own.
"I started in November, doing plyos and lifting and stuff in the gym," Keenan said. Mayer and Keenan did well even without Keenan's passing skills last year. Like most young teams, the pair started off in the qualifiers. They made the main draw for the first time in Santa Barbara, only their third event together. Two events later, the former Waves stunned Hermosa Beach. They came through the qualifier, made it through Saturday, and took home a third-place finish, tying a record for highest finish for a qualifier. After that, Mayer and Keenan no longer had to worry about playing a day early. With all their success, Mayer and Keenan are working on staying at the top of their game.
"We want to be in that top 10," Keenan said.
The pair have earned the respect of the teams in those spots right now; so much so, the players voted Keenan, who was third in aces, eighth in blocks and sixth in kill percentage, as the 2006 Rookie of the Year.
With so much accomplished already, what do else do Keenan and Mayer want?
"Better finishes, it's pretty simple," Mayer said.

Gold Crown Open main draw begins
Karch Kiraly and Kevin Wong win first-round match
By Mike Scarr / AVP.com
MIAMI -- Karch Kiraly and partner Kevin Wong found their names in the contender's bracket while Misty-May Treanor and Kerri Walsh continued their winning ways as play in the main draw advanced at the AVP Cuervo Gold Crown Open on Saturday.
Kiraly and Wong, a pair of UCLA Bruins, advanced out of their first round match Saturday morning with a 27-25, 21-16 victory.
Matched against Mike Morrison and Ty Tramblie, a team that survived Friday's qualifying round, Kiraly and Wong endured a marathon in the first game. The two hadn't paired together before but some adjustments in the second game produced a victory.
Kiraly and Wong moved on to play Casey Jennings and Mike Williams, the seventh-seeded team which earned a bye into Saturday's second round, but dropped a three-game match, 22-20, 17-21, 17-15, to fall into the contender's bracket. Kiraly and Wong had match point at 14-13 in Game 3 but were unable to hold.
May-Treanor and Walsh faced a pair of backcourt specialists in their first match Saturday, the sister pairing of Katie and Tracy Lindquist. Walsh and May-Treanor opened their season with a victory but it proved a bit tougher than expected.
After dropping the first game 15-21, the Lindquists extended the top women's team by gutting out a 26-24 overtime victory in Game 2. It was the second time the pair has taken a game from Walsh/May-Treanor in their respective careers.
But the magic wasn't there for the upset as Walsh and May-Treanor produced a 15-10 victory in the third game to advance to Saturday's third round to play Jenny Pavley and Sarah Straton, who were 21-18, 21-11 winners over Michelle More and Suzanne Stonebarger.
May-Treanor and Walsh found their rhythm in the next round, upending Pavley and Straton, 21-17, 21-18 in 34 minutes, to advance to the quarterfinals. There they were scheduled to face Tyra Turner and Rachel Wacholder, the fourth seed and 16-21, 21-16, 21-17 winners over Angie Akers and Brooke Hanson.
Another men's seeded team to advance was the No. 2 pairing of Phil Dalhausser and Todd Rogers, who put together a tight 24-22, 21-19 match over Brent Doble and Ty Loomis that required 58 minutes to complete. Dalhausser and Rogers moved on to play Jennings and Williams in the third round.
Men's teams to advance into the third round of the winner's bracket included Mike Lambert and Stein Metzger for a matchup with John Hyden and George Roumain; and Jake Gibb and Sean Rosenthal with a matchup against Anthony Medel and Fred Souza.
Bounced out of the women's winner's bracket and over to the contender's bracket were Holly McPeak and Logan Tom. They faced the quickly emerging duo of Jennifer Boss and April Ross, who posted a 21-19, 21-14 victory to advance into the third round and face Annett Davis and Jenny Johnson Jordan.
Carrie Dodd and Tatiana Minello won their first match of the day to set up a third round showdown with the second-seeded team of Nicole Branagh and Elaine Youngs.
Brad Hannemann and Ed Ratledge, a Friday qualifier, dropped their first match of the day in three games. Matt Olson and Jason Ring prevailed, 21-19, 16-21, 15-9, in a match that ran three minutes past the hour mark. Olson and Ring faced Paul Baxter and Canyon Ceman in the third round.
The two other Friday qualifiers, Mike DiPierro and Ran Kumgisky; and Billy Allen and AJ Mihalic, also lost their first matches Saturday to move over to the contender's bracket.
Early winners in the women's contender's bracket were Jill Changaris and Sara Dukes, Alicia Polzin and Paula Roca, Dianne DeNecochea and Barbra Fontana, More and Stonebarger, and Lauren Fendrick and Brittany Hochevar.
Winners on the men's side of the contender's bracket were Dax Holdren and Jeff Nygaard, and Hans Stolfus and Scott Wong.
Mike Scarr is a senior reporter for AVP.com.

Primed for a big season
Duo aiming for Tour title after contending in 2006
By Monique Moyal / AVP.com
With a little bit of beachside relaxation paired with some intense off-season training, the reigning 2006 AVP Defensive and Offensive Players of the Year, Todd Rogers and Phil Dalhausser, are poised with renewed stamina to take their 2007 season deep into each championship round like they did last year.
That stamina was apparent in the pair's first official match of 2007 in the AVP Cuervo Gold Crown Miami Open, when they took on the No. 15 combination of No. Ty Loomis and Brent Doble this afternoon.
"We do a lot of stuff with a coach on the track, we do 400-yard sprints, which are hard, bleachers and just this circuit on which you never really catch your breath," Rogers said. "You're always really tired, so it's good that you can go jump when you're really tired."
In the first set of the match, Loomis and Doble took an early lead at 4-3, until the teams flipped back and forth for control of the board for the next two sets. Dalhausser and Rogers kept pace and control of the match with their own game of cat and mouse, never letting the lead get to them.
In the end, the No. 2 seed with eight 2006 AVP Crocs titles to its name pulled out on top of Loomis and Doble 24-22 and 21-19.
"We had a great season last year and it's gonna be tough to do the same thing because there's even more competition in my opinion," Rogers said. "We just battled out there in our first game, so there's just no gimmies out here."
In 2007, Dalhausser and Rogers also enjoy the privilege of being in the small minority, about 30 percent, of teams who have been together for at least one year. Including the qualifiers and the main draw contenders in Miami, 48 teams are pairing up for the first time.
"It gives you a little bit of an advantage, the longer you play [together]," Rogers said. "You know each other and you know what makes each other tick, their sets, where they're gonna block where they're gonna do stuff - different plays that a lot of people who didn't play together are not sure [of]. But then again you also have to keep up a good even keel upon one another, because you kind of get on each other's nerves more, definitely the longer you play together."
According to Rogers, the key to keeping an even keel and maintaining a second-year partnership also has to do with off-season training.
"I actually told him, 'Look, I'm not gonna even touch a ball with you. If you wanna hang around and go surfing, I'd love to go surfing with you,'" Rogers said. "It's a totally different atmosphere. It's totally mellow, just chillin' out in the ocean."
And surf they did.
Both men have the advantage of living in beach areas, as Rogers is a native of Santa Barbara, Calif., and Dalhausser is a local boy to the Florida scene as a product of Central Florida University.
For those familiar with the West Coast, Santa Barbara is not typically a huge surf location unless you are a local. The Channel Islands, which stretch down south as far as Ventura, Calif., tend to block the swell and provide an easy environment, ideal for beginners.
"I think I went surfing with him three times in January. And then I took him to this secret spot up the coast, because I'm from Santa Barbara and it was awesome," Rogers said. "It was just he and I and it was a really good day. But he got into surfing a couple of years ago and he's got a couple of friends who go in Florida. So now he's got his board and his wetsuit and he loves it. He's getting better and it's just relaxing, and fun."
At 6-foot-9 Phil Dalhausser is hands down the best candidate for the tallest man on a board.
As far as the volleyball courts are concerned, however, Dalhausser is no novice. And with a partner like Todd Rogers, a repeat of their success has the potential to unfold once again in the 2007 season.
That is, if Dalhausser can keep Rogers on the sandy courts and away from a surfboard until the off-season.
"It's good though living in Santa Barbara because in the summer there's not much waves," Rogers said. "So when I'm off, I have more time to surf, the surf's coming in it kind of works real well. If there's surf all the time, I could be in trouble. It would be tough to keep my game from suffering."

Taut matches dot the day of play
PB and J crew went face-to-face on Saturday
By Mike Scarr / AVP.com
MIAMI -- Aaron Wachtfogel and Hans Stolfus got together for a little PB and J time Saturday afternoon.
The pair teamed up for the entire 2006 season and climbed to seventh on tour, enjoying third- and fifth-place finishes early in the year, but generating some buzz at the Hermosa Open.
Entered as the eighth seed, Stolfus and Wachtfogel marched through the winner's bracket and into a Saturday afternoon match against the top seed and winner of the previous three events, Todd Rogers and Phil Dalhausser.
Friends of Stolfus and Wachtfogel at the event came armed with a megaphone, stereo and T-shirts that read, "Peanut Butter Jelly Time Crew," named after a song made popular by the TV show The Family Guy. As Stolfus and Wachtfogul warmed up, their supporters started singing the "Peanut Butter Jelly Time" song.
The pair dropped the first game 21-17 but rallied past match point in the second game for a 30-28 victory, much to the delight of their singing fans. They ultimately won a sudden death third game, 19-17, and a nickname was born. Peanut Butter Jelly stuck for the rest of the season
Stolfus and Wachtfogel parted ways in the offseason and found themselves on opposite sides of the net Saturday. Austin Rester is now paired with Wachtfogel while Stolfus has teamed with Scott Wong.
The two teams split the first two games Saturday while Wachtfogel and Rester pulled out a 15-9 victory in Game 3 to take the match. Stolfus and Wong finished 13th for the tournament but Wachtfogel and Rester moved on to play Anthony Medel and Fred Souza in another elimination match.
Stein Metzger and Mike Lambert also saw some familiar faces in their third-round match Saturday, when they met the duo of John Hyden and George Roumain.
Lambert, Hyden and Roumain were all members of the 2000 U.S. Olympic indoor team. Hyden also teamed with Lambert to win the Cincinnati Open in 2005.
No favors were given, though, as the match extended to three games, eating up nearly an hour and a quarter. After Lambert and Metzger took the first game, 21-19, Roumain and Hyden stormed back to take Game 2, 21-17, behind Roumain's strong net play.
Lambert and Metzger won the third game, 15-12, to get a pass into Sunday's quarterfinal, while Hyden and Roumain slid over to the contender's bracket and a matchup against Ryan Mariano and Larry Witt.
Lambert and Metzger will face Matt Olson and Jason Ring on Sunday.
"We had a pretty easy first game and, in our second one, it wasn't our prettiest match but we found a way to win against a team that is playing well and managed to advance," Lambert said.
Holly McPeak teamed with relatively new partner Logan Tom on Saturday.
The pair played together in two matches last season but Tom suffered an abdominal tear and McPeak was forced to finish the season with Dianne DeNecochea.
Their first match Saturday drew the new twosome of Jennifer Boss and April Ross, a pair that began practicing together in just the last couple of weeks. Early adjustments for Boss and Ross were quickly set aside as the two found their common ground.
A 21-12 first game win for the pair rolled into a 21-16 second game and a match victory to send McPeak and Tom into the contender's bracket.
"We kind of got our jitters out and came out and got after it in our second game," Ross said. "We definitely had respect for our opponent in Logan and Holly but we knew we just had to play our game and get into our rhythm."
In other top matches, Paul Baxter and Canyon Ceman defeated the fifth-seeded team of Dax Holdren and Jeff Nygaard in the second round, 21-18, 16-21, 15-9, sending Holdren and Nygaard into the contender's bracket.
Another second-round upset saw Olson and Ring upending the No. 4 seed, Matt Fuerbringer and Sean Scott, 21-19, 16-21, 15-9. That generated sufficient momentum to vault them into a Sunday quarter-final match against Lambert and Metzger.
It also dropped Fuerbringer and Scott into the contender's bracket, where they survived a match against Eric Fonoimoana and Chad Turner, 21-19, 17-21, 15-13, to earn and subsequently drop a match with Holdren and Nygaard.
Mike Scarr is a senior reporter for AVP.com. Keith Dobkowski contributed to this report.

Dalhausser, Rogers have streak alive
Top seeds on both sides ready for final day
By Monique Moyal and Mike Scarr
MIAMI -- And then there were eight times two as both the men's and women's sides moved to the final day of the AVP Cuervo Gold Crown Miami Open on Sunday.
Partnered with Sean Rosenthal for the No. 3 seed, Jake Gibb is vying for his third straight AVP opener title this weekend. On Sunday morning, they face second-seeded Phil Dalhausser and Todd Rogers.
Dalhausser and Rogers won the last regular season AVP event in Cincinnati in 2006 and washed it down with the postseason Lake Tahoe, Calif. title. The two will look to carry that streak into 2007.
But six other teams would like to end both streaks at two.
One team standing in the way of their run to the top is the top-seeded Mike Lambert and Stein Metzger, last year's Crocs Cup winners.
The road for No. 13 Matt Olson and Jason Ring, who have already upset two teams in their journey, next runs through the combination of Lambert and Metzger in tomorrow's opening match.
In the contender's bracket John Hyden and George Roumain knocked off No. 11 Ryan Mariano and Larry Witt to keep their hopes alive. In order to top their eighth seed, the duo needs to do the same against the winningest player on the AVP when they face off against No. 10 Karch Kiraly and Kevin Wong.
After dropping to the contender's bracket, No. 7 Casey Jennings and Mark Williams pushed past No. 5 Dax Holdren and Jeff Nygaard. They will face sixth-seeded Anthony Medel and Fred Souza tomorrow.
The women's side of the draw is taking shape as expected as Misty May-Treanor and Kerri Walsh started off the season in the same fashion they've begun the last four -- with a win.
They bolted through Saturday's main draw, pausing once to drop a game to Katie and Tracy Lindquist in their first match of the day, and advanced to Sunday from their perch as the No. 1 seed. After dropping Jenny Pavley and Sarah Straton in 34 minutes in their second match of the day, they found time to regroup.
In their first match Sunday, May-Treanor will face the duo of Tyra Turner and Rachel Wacholder, the fourth seed in the tournament. Turner and Wacholder also played through the winner's bracket without a loss but realize they have a tough opponent on the horizon.
"We have to keep the pressure on them and not make a lot of errors," Wacholder said. "We know that they're the best in the world and are going to make some spectacular plays and we're fine with it. We just have to stay in our game and accept that they'll do great things and not beat ourselves."
Wacholder is looking for her partner to have an impact.
"Tyra is such a big, athletic girl, just her size and blocking I think can affect their game," Wacholder said. "I think her presence and her serving can help us a lot."
In the bottom half of the women's winner's bracket, Jennifer Boss and April Ross will face Nicole Branagh and Elaine Youngs. Boss and Ross played one extra game Saturday while Branagh and Youngs enjoyed a bye as the No. 2 seed but Ross felt that was an advantage.
"We're just going to go in and focus on our side of the net," Ross said. "That's what we did today and we know that if we do that we can do really well."
Other Sunday matches on the women's side include Angie Akers and Brooke Hanson against Heidi Ilustre and Diane Pascua; Dianne DeNecochea and Barbra Fontana against Annett Davis and Jenny Johnson Jordan in the contender's bracket.
Play starts at 8 a.m. ET on Sunday with the men's final a 2:30 p.m. and the women's final at 4:00 p.m.

Goliaths on a collision course
Rogers/Dalhausser, Lambert/Metzger win through
By Mike Scarr / AVP.com
MIAMI -- Not all educational television is found on PBS, or The History Channel or even Discovery.
Phil Dalhausser is a big fan of classic volleyball reels on cable and saw the very pearls of wisdom bestowed by the likes of Randy Stoklos and Sinjin Smith and Karch Kiraly on display before his eyes.
None of those three were on the court with Dalhausser in Saturday afternoon's main draw of the AVP Cuervo Gold Crown Miami Open, though Kiraly was making news of his own on some outer courts.
But with partner Todd Rogers, a veteran who has rightly been called The Professor for his knowledge of the game, Dalhausser was able to play student and earn a spot into a quarterfinal match against Jake Gibb and Sean Rosenthal on Sunday.
"We just tightened up and didn't give in," Dalhausser said. "Basically Todd started out great in the last game to win the match."
Rogers and Dalhausser prevailed, 21-16, 21-23, 15-12, in a match that saw them squander match point in the second game. Dalhausser said neither player executed particularly well in either of their matches Sunday, but their win over Casey Jennings and Mark Williams was all about guts.
"In those shows, Karch would say when they were down 13-9 it was tough to win points off of them. They sided out every ball and chipped away and soon it would be 14-13 and that is the same type of deal today with Todd," Dalhausser said. "He is the veteran. He knew that stuff wasn't going our way but he figured it out. He's crafty, he's got great ball control and he plays great defense."
In the other quarterfinal match Sunday, Mike Lambert and Stein Metzger will face Matt Olson and Jason Ring. Lambert and Metzger cruised through an easy first match Saturday, dispatching Brad Keenan and John Mayer, 21-17, 21-10, but ran into a tough opponent in their third-round match.
Facing George Roumain and John Hyden, Lambert and Metzger were stretched to a third game before winning, 21-19, 17-21, 15-12.
Lambert said that he thinks he and Metzger are better this year but will take some time to adjust.
"It is the first tourney of the year, so everyone is getting fired up," Lambert said. "People are getting ready for the season, and it's a long season, but once you get here and see everything, it is kind of like the first day of school. It was fun to get out there."
Kiraly and Wong found their names in the contender's bracket while Misty-May Treanor and Kerri Walsh continued their winning ways.
Matched against Mike Morrison and Ty Tramblie, a team that survived Friday's qualifying round, Kiraly and Wong endured a marathon in the first game. The two hadn't paired together before, but some adjustments in the second game produced a victory.
Kiraly and Wong moved on to play Jennings and Williams, the seventh-seeded team, but dropped a three-game match, 22-20, 17-21, 17-15, to fall into the contender's bracket. Kiraly and Wong had match point at 14-13 in Game 3 but were unable to hold.
They methodically worked their way through the contender's bracket, though, winning four matches to set up a date with Hyden and Roumain on Sunday.
May-Treanor and Walsh faced a pair of backcourt specialists in their first match Saturday, the sister pairing of Katie and Tracy Lindquist. Walsh and May-Treanor opened their season with a victory but it proved a bit tougher than expected.
After dropping the first game 15-21, the Lindquists extended the top women's team by gutting out a 26-24 overtime victory in Game 2. It was the second time the pair has taken a game from Walsh/May-Treanor in their respective careers.
But the magic wasn't there for the upset, as Walsh and May-Treanor produced a 15-10 victory in the third game. May-Treanor and Walsh then upended Jenny Pavley and Sarah Straton, 21-17, 21-18, to advance to the quarterfinals, where they will face Tyra Turner and Rachel Wacholder.
"It was a great day. It wasn't as good as I think it could have been but we battled through," Wacholder said. "It was good for us to deal with as a team, just the pressure and working through stuff."
April Ross and Jennifer Boss advanced to the women's quarterfinals where they will face Nicole Branagh and Elaine Youngs.
Other Sunday matches on the women's side include Angie Akers and Brooke Hanson against Heidi Ilustre and Diane Pascua; Dianne DeNecochea and Barbra Fontana against Annett Davis and Jenny Johnson Jordan in the contender's bracket.
In addition to Kiraly/Wong against Hyden/Roumain, the other men's contender's bracket match will pit Jennings and Williams against Anthony Medel and Fred Souza.
A casualty on Saturday was the team of Holly McPeak and Logan Tom. After getting dropped from the winner's bracket in the morning, they lost a contender's bracket match to Ilustre and Pascua and were eliminated.
Mike Scarr is a senior reporter for AVP.com.

Kiraly, Wong play to Sunday
New pairing goes 4-1 despite most prep
By Walter Villa / AVP.com
Volleyball legend Karch Kiraly disputed a referee's call in Saturday's AVP Cuervo Gold Crown Miami Open, which caught the attention of a fan.
"Hey, ref," the fan yelled. "Give the call to Karch. He wrote the rules back when you were a fetus."
It was not only funny; it demonstrated the respect fans have for Kiraly, 46, a three-time Olympic champ and the most famous name in beach volleyball. True, the ref did not reverse his call, but Kiraly didn't really need the help.
Kiraly and new teammate Kevin Wong -- playing their first tournament together -- went 4-1 on the day and advanced to the semifinals of the Contenders Bracket. They will need to win five matches on Sunday to earn the championship at Bicentennial Park in downtown Miami.
Kiraly said he was pleased with his team's performance, especially considering that he didn't get to practice much with Wong before the tournament. Kiraly leads the tournament with 73 digs and Wong is first with 24 blocks.
"Kevin lives in Hawaii in the offseason," said Kiraly, who is based in California and playing his last year on the tour. "He flew to the mainland less than two weeks ago. We probably got in four practices. So considering all that, I am happy with how we played."
Kiraly and Wong, seeded 10th, opened the double-elimination main draw by beating 23rd-seeded Mike Morrison and Ty Tramble, 27-25, 21-15.
But in the second round, they lost to seventh-seeded Casey "The Kid" Jennings and Mark Williams, 22-20, 17-21, 17-15. Jennings is married to Olympic gold medalist and top women's seed Kerri Walsh. Williams, a native of Australia, trained with Kiraly for three months this summer before forming a new partnership with Jennings.
"We kind of let Williams and Casey Jennings off the hook a little bit," Kiraly said. "We really should have beaten them. That made our work harder today."
No worries, though. Kiraly-Wong rallied by knocking out 24th-seeded A.J. Mihalic and Billy Allen, 21-11, 21-18, and then eliminated 16th-seeded Nick Lucena and Will Strickland, 21-16, 20-22, 15-12.
In their final match of the day, Kiraly and Wong sent another team packing -- 12th-seeded Paul Baxter and Canyon Ceman, 21-15, 20-22, 15-12. The loss in such a close struggle was tough to take for Ceman and Baxter.
"Obviously, I am not happy about the match," Baxter said. "I think we should have won. We had some chances that we just didn't make. As far as them winning it all, they are going to have to play pretty darn good."
Kiraly realizes that. He and Wong will play Sunday at 8 a.m. against eighth-seeded John "The H Bomb" Hyden -- a two-time Olympian -- and George Roumain, the 2004 AVP Rookie of the Year.
If Kiraly and Wong beat them, they could get a rematch with Jennings-Williams before crossing over to the winner's bracket.
"There are a lot of really, really good teams left," Kiraly said. "The top teams are still mostly undefeated in the winner's bracket. But we feel good. Kevin was awesome today. He was a stud, blocking everything."
Asked how he will prepare for Sunday, Kiraly said he had a plan.
"My sister is picking up food, and we are just going to eat outside by the pool at our hotel and go right to bed," Kiraly said. "I am exhausted. We got a great workout today."

Several squads surprise on Saturday
PB and J Time partners face each other
By Colleen Murray / AVP.com
April Ross got a big surprise right before the season started, and it wasn't a pleasant one.
"My [off-season] was really good until about a week ago," Ross said on March 29. "Nancy [Mason] just figured out that she had an injury that she had to take care of. She had an MRI and didn't see it before, so now she has to fix it. I'm trying to find someone to play with in these first two tournaments."
Luckily for Ross, Mason's former partner, Jennifer Boss, faced a similar situation. Boss thought she would be starting the season with Keao Burdine, but Burdine, playing professionally in Puerto Rico, hadn't returned from her season in time for the AVP tour stop in Miami. Ross and Boss found each other, got some practice in and came in to Miami as the 11th seed and ready to play.
After a smooth match against Floridian qualifiers Tara Kuk and Kim Whitney (21-12, 21-16) in the first round, Boss and Ross -- the 2006 co-Rookie of the Year -- earned a matchup with Logan Tom -- the other 2006 co-Rookie of the Year -- and partner Holly McPeak, the all-time winningest woman on the beach. But facing off against credentials like those didn't intimidate the new partners. Boss and Ross took the match in two games (21-19, 21-14).
Ross and Boss' success landed them in a college-rivalry matchup with UCLA grads Annett Davis and Jenny Johnson Jordan. The former Bruins handed the former Trojans their first game loss of the day, but Ross and Boss battled back, taking the next two games, 21-18, 15-10.
Ross and Boss hope to continue their winning streak against second-seeded Elaine Youngs and Nicole Branagh on Sunday morning.
Also on the women's side, 12th-seeded Angie Akers and Brooke Hanson handed a surprising defeat to fifth-seeded Dianne DeNecochea and Barbara Fontana (26-24, 19-21, 15-12) in the second round. When Akers and Hanson kicked off their third round battle with fourth-seeded Tyra Turner and Rachel Wacholder, it looked as if the upset streak might continue. Akers and Hanson won the first game, 21-16. Turner and Wacholder stormed back, however, and took the next two games (21-16, 19-17) to advance in the Winners Bracket.
Akers and Hanson defeated Angela Lewis and Priscilla Lima in the Contenders Bracket and will play Heidi Ilustre and Diane Pascua tomorrow.
Former partners Cemen and Olson square off: With 70 percent of the teams on the men's side playing together for the first time, former partners were bound to play against each other. But for Canyon Ceman and Matt Olson, who together notched a fifth-place finish in Chicago last year, a Winners Bracket matchup seemed unlikely. Both men would need two straight victories -- including one upset apiece -- with their new partners.
Neither team breezed through its first-round match. Twelfth-seeded Ceman and partner Paul Baxter dropped their first game to qualifiers Mike DiPierro and Ran Kumgisky, but won two straight (21-16, 19-17) to move on and play fifth-seeded Dax Holdren and Jeff Nygaard.
Olson and Jason Ring, the 13th seeded squad, also needed three games to defeat their first-round opponents, qualifiers Albert Hannemann and Ed Ratledge (21-19, 16-21, 15-9). Next up for Olson and Ring were fourth-seeded Matt Fuerbringer and Sean Scott. The underdogs were again victorious, defeating the higher-seeded opponents in a two-game sweep to set up the former-partner showdown.
The parallel journeys had to end when Olson and Ceman faced each other. The lower-seeded Olson and Ring came away with their second-straight upset (21-17, 21-14). They will continue play on Sunday in the Winners Bracket against Mike Lambert and Stein Metzger. The winner will advance to the semifinals.
In another former partner matchup, ninth-seeded Hans Stolfus and Scott Wong were pitted against Stolfus's former partner and the other half of last year's Peanut Butter Jelly Time craze, Aaron Wachtfogel, and his new teammate Austin Rester.
Wachtfogel and Rester fell in the next round to sixth-seeded Anthony Medel and Fred Souza and earned a ninth-place finish for the day.

Kiraly survives match and thrives on tour
By MANNY NAVARRO
mnavarro@MiamiHerald.com
Andrew Uloza / For the Miami Herald
Karch Kiraly, three-time Olympic gold medalist, plays during the professional beach volleyball AVP Cuervo Gold Crown Miami Open on Saturday, April 14, 2007.
AVP Cuervo Gold Crown Miami Open results
For the past 28 years, he has kissed his wife Janna good-bye in the morning and headed for work with a pair of trunks and sandals on and a bottle of sunscreen in his hand.
Karch Kiraly has made the beach his office longer than anyone else in his sport. And along the way, he's won more tournaments (148), more Olympic gold medals (3) and made more money ($3 million in career earnings) than anybody in volleyball.
So, why in the world at age 46 is he still playing in pro events like this weekend's AVP Cuervo Gold Crown Miami Open at Bicentennial Park against players half his age? Aside from trying to win some more, Kiraly said he's trying to prove athletes can age gracefully and still win without cheating or using performance enhancing drugs.
''I'm not necessarily in the camp where you retire at the top -- I want to push the envelope,'' Kiraly said.
``I'm certainly not the same player I was 10 years ago, I'm not jumping as high. I'm not able to hit those, radical, straight-down shots like I used to . . . but I'm all right with that. I don't want to take human growth hormones or do all the other steroids that are out there. I want people to see an athlete can age reasonably gracefully and not resort to cheating to do it.''
On Saturday, on the first day of the main draw, the only time Kiraly showed he was still human was when he ducked out of the South Florida heat for some shade and water. He and his signature pink hat -- the same one he began wearing during a record 13-tournament winning streak in 1992 with then teammate Kent Steffes -- went through more than three gallons of water, either drinking or dousing himself with it, in each of his five matches.
At the end of his the day, Kiraly and new teammate Kevin Wong, the 10th seeded men's team, staved off elimination by beating Paul Baxter and Kenyan Ceman 21-15, 20-22, 15-12 for the fourth victory in a 11-hours worth of sweat and grit.
Win or lose today, Kiraly will stick around today to watch what has now become the biggest attraction on the tour -- the top women's team of Misty May-Treanor and Kerri Walsh, who won gold in the last Olympics and made news Saturday when they actually dropped a set to Katie and Tracy Lindquist in the second round.
The four-time defending women's champs are expected to play in today's women's final, which follows the men's final at 2:30 p.m. Kiraly isn't expected to get to the men's final or past the current crop of top men's teams. But that doesn't mean the fire is gone -- or his love for hecklers and rowdy fans.
''I'd love to win another one,'' Kiraly said. ``and push that record for oldest champ back a few more years.''
It's been nearly two years since Kiraly last won an event, when he and former teammate Mike Lambert won at Huntington Beach, Calif., in July 2005. After this weekend, he'll play in 10 more AVP events, hoping to push the record for oldest player to win a tournament from 44 to 46.
And while three shoulder surgeries and knee trouble last year have slowed him down considerably, that doesn't mean his friends aren't rooting to see one last victory from him.
''He is one in a million,'' Walsh said. ``I don't think they'll ever be another Karch Kiraly.''
Many players, including Jake Gibb say they too are enthralled by the Kiraly phenomenon, often going to watch him play between their own matches.
''I look at him as a volleyball god,'' Gibb said. ``What he still does to this day at 45 -- he's still balling.
``I'll go over and watch his match when I don't have a match going just to get my final glimpses of him to learn one final thing we should all learn from the guy we should all be learning from.''
Kiraly said he has learned a lot as his body has begun to grow older. He admits his famed 41-inch vertical is long gone and said he hasn't bothered to check what it is now out of fear it will depress him. But with time, he says, he's learned how to win with smarts.
''It was natural for Michael Jordan to get old, and I admired him aging, becoming a little less explosive, but still being a great player,'' Kiraly said.
``I don't mind it if people say Karch isn't the same player. But can I still win? There is something to be said when you struggle to win when your incapacitated.''
Kiraly showed that three seasons ago when when at age 43 he and Mike Lambert teammed up to with the AVP tour title -- even with Kiraly playing the final stretch of the season with a separated shoulder and unable to leap up for spikes or blocks.
'I never would have thought six years later, six years after being were saying `Karch is done,' to be back on top,'' Kiraly said. ``I'm proud of that accomplishment. To win a tournament with no shoulder and everybody knowing it in the stadium, including my opponents is amazing and that's nothing to be embarrassed about.''
``To be honest, all of this has been icing on the cake. It could have easily been over 10 years ago. That's why it is really not that hard to know that this is my final year when I got 10 extra years I wasn't at all sure I would be able to get.''
The only thing Kiraly gets embarrassed about is flaunting his victories. His three gold medals -- two won with the U.S. team indoors in 1984 and 1988 -- are tucked away in a drawer in his home along with the three national championship rings he won at UCLA.
The game has changed plenty since Kiraly played in the first professional U.S. event on Huntington Beach with his high school coach in 1978. When he started playing, beach volleyball was a defensive game and players were not allowed to cross the net with their hands. In the time since, bigger players have entered, blocks, spikes and jump serves have thrilled fans, the court has shrunk by 20 percent and men and women are finally playing together on the same tour.
''Other than that,'' Kiraly joked. ``Nothing has really changed. It's the same game.''
After his pro career is over, Kiraly said he wants to spend more time with his two boys, 16-year-old Krisitian and 15-year-old Kory, who recently picked up the sport and began playing it in high school.
In addition to coaching his kids, Kiraly will launch his own volleyball academy, which will feature a pair of five-day camps for high school girls as well a grassroots tournament for amateurs in Huntington.
As for the AVP Tour, he said he hopes it will continue to expand. He hopes the next step is to include more international players, who currently play in Europe, and the growth of a feeder tour. He said he'd also like to see the sport highlighted on ESPN's SportsCenter, something that rarely happens right now.
While he says the AVP has not spoken with him about having an official role with the tour once he retires, he says if a job were to arise he would seriously consider it.
''I wanted to remembered as a guy who played at a really high level for a long time and really cared about what he was doing,'' Kiraly said. ``And loved what he was doing.''

Roumain reaches fourth round
By Sharon Robb
South Florida Sun-Sentinel
Posted April 15 2007
George Roumain of Calabasas, Calif., is the only player with local connections remaining in today's $200,000 AVP Cuervo Gold Crown Open at Bicentennial Park in Miami.
The former St. Thomas Aquinas and Douglas player and his new partner John Hyden of Sherman Oaks, Calif. will play volleyball legend Karch Kiraly and Kevin Wong in today's fourth round of the contender's bracket at 8 a.m.
LocalLinks
Roumain and Hyden, the No. 8 seeds, gave top seeds Mike Lambert and Stein Metzger their toughest match Saturday before losing 21-19, 17-21, 15-12 in 1 hour and 12 minutes.
Former Western High player Nick Lucena of Davie and Will Strickland lost their second-round contender's bracket game to Kiraly and Wong 21-16, 20-22, 15-12 and split $1,700.
The only local qualifier -- Mike DiPierro of Pompano Beach -- and Ran Kumgisky of Santa Monica, Calif., lost to No. 12 seeds Paul Baxter and Canyon Ceman 18-21, 21-16, 19-17 in 1:07 in their first round and Ryan Mariano and Larry Witt 21-17, 21-17 in their final match. They split $800.
The top-seeded women's team of Misty May-Treanor of Coral Springs and Kerri Walsh also advanced and will face No. 4 seed Tyra Turner and Rachel Wacholder today.

Locals advance
VOLLEYBALL: May now in fourth round, as is Ross, Gibb and Lambert in AVP opener.
MIAMI — Newport Harbor High graduates Misty May-Treanor and April Ross both advanced to the winner's bracket fourth round of the AVP Cuervo Gold Crown Miami Open on Saturday.
Costa Mesa residents Mike Lambert and Jake Gibb are also in today's championship fourth round of the AVP Tour-opening event.
May-Treanor and Kerri Walsh, the 2006 AVP women's Team of the Year and No. 1 seed, defeated No. 16 seed Katie and Tracy Lindquist, 21-15, 24-26, 15-10 in their first match of the day. They then topped No. 8 seed Jenny Pavley and Sarah Straton, 21-17, 21-17.
May-Treanor and Walsh will face No. 4-seeded Tyra Turner and Rachel Wacholder today to try to advance to the semifinals.
Ross and teammate Jennifer Boss, seeded No. 11, topped Tara Kuk and Kim Whitney, 21-12, 21-16. Ross and Boss then upset Holly McPeak and Logan Tom, the No. 6 seed, 21-18 and 21-14 in the second round.
They will play second-seeded Nicole Branagh and Elaine Youngs in another winner's bracket fourth-round match.
Lambert is again teamed with Stein Metzger. The men's No.1-seeded team, also the 2006 AVP men's Team of the Year, swept No. 17 Brad Keenan and John Mayer, 21-17, 21-10 and squeaked by No. 8 seed John Hyden and George Roumain, 21-19, 17-21, 15-12. Lambert and Metzger will play No. 13 seed Matt Olson and Jason Ring today.
Gibb and Sean Rosenthal, the No. 3 seed, got by 19th-seeded Adam Jewell and Jose Loiola, 21-16, 21-16, in their first match Saturday. They then came from behind for a win over No. 6 Anthony Medel of Costa Mesa and Fred Souza, 19-21, 21-14, 15-10. Gibb and Rosenthal play No. 2-seeded Phil Dalhausser and Todd Rogers today.
Estancia High product Matt Fuerbringer and Sean Scott, the No. 4 seed, were beaten by No. 13 seed Matt Olson and Jason Ring, 21-14, 26-24, in the winner's bracket second round. They are out of the tournament, splitting $1,700 and finishing 13th after then losing a contender's bracket match to No. 5 Dax Holdren and Jeff Nyguard, 17-21, 21-18, 15-12.
Ty Tramblie of Newport Beach and partner Mike Morrison finished in 17th place after losing a contender's bracket first-round match. Ty Loomis of Newport Beach, the No. 15 seed along with Brent Doble, also finish 17th, splitting $800. Janelle Ruen of Newport Beach, the No. 17 seed along with Jennifer Snyder, also finished 17th.

Jordan's strength
AVP pro counts loved ones as biggest fans
By Walter Villa / AVP.com
MIAMI - Jenny Johnson Jordan and Annett Davis were eliminated Sunday from the AVP Cuervo Gold Crown Miami Open at Bicentennial Park. But Davis said she can deal with the loss for two main reasons:
Son Mya, 5, and daughter Victoria, 1.
"I'm over (the loss)" Davis said, minutes after Barbra Fontana and Dianne DeNecochea advanced to the contender's final with a 21-13, 23-21 win. "It's great to know I can call home (to Valencia, Calif.) and get love and support from my husband, my kids and my entire family. Plus, there is another tournament next week."
Jordan, the more emotional and vocal of the two long-time teammates, agrees with Davis.
"There is more to life than volleyball," said Jordan, who has a daughter Jaylen, 5, and a son Kory, 1. "I love volleyball, but family is the most important thing for me."
And what a family it is. Jordan's father, Rafer Johnson, was an Olympic decathlon star. He won a silver medal at the 1956 Games in Melbourne and a gold at the 1960 Games in Rome.
Jordan, 33, has a younger brother, Josh, who was a Pac-10 champion in the javelin. And her husband, Kevin Jordan, was a wide receiver for UCLA and played three years in the NFL.
Davis also comes from an athletic family. Her father, Cleveland Buckner, was a 6-9 center who came off the bench and tried to guard legendary 7-footer Wilt Chamberlain on the night he set the NBA's single-game scoring record with 100 points.
"In the end, my dad was guarding him," Davis said. "The guy who was guarding Wilt most of the game fouled out. My dad said the hoop was big for everyone that night because he averaged, I think, 11 points for the season, and that night he scored 35. So it was a huge night for him as well."
Her husband is also a former star athlete. Byron Davis was a 12-time All-American swimmer at UCLA, specializing in the butterfly. In 1996, he came within three-tenths of a second of becoming the first black swimmer to make a U.S. Olympic team.
While Byron Davis came up just short of Olympic glory, his wife and Jordan made the 2000 Games in Sydney.
They finished fifth, which both rank as their career highlight - which is saying something since they also ended the record 89-match win streak of Olympic champs Kerri Walsh and Misty May-Treanor.
"Beating Kerri and Misty was great because no U.S. team had beaten them until that point," Davis said. "It was great to show that they are human, and it can happen. We definitely felt, especially at that time (2004), that out of all the teams out there, that we should beat them. We are a physical team, and I think we matched up well with them."
Still, though, the Olympic experience was No. 1.
"As great as it was, I don't look at beating Kerri and Misty as our top accomplishment," Davis said. "I think how we had to go to make the 2000 Olympics - that whole road - was probably our greatest feat.
"We had never played beach volleyball before. Here we were, two girls who didn't play beach growing up, and there we were in the Olympics."
They had indeed come a long way since growing up in Southern California as rivals at different high schools and club teams.
"We didn't like each other back then," Davis said with a laugh.
That all changed when they both showed up at UCLA as freshmen on volleyball scholarships. Neither knew the other was being recruited by the Bruins - this was pre-Internet - until the first day of practice.
"By our sophomore years," Davis said, "we chose each other as roommates, and we have been together ever since. Our husbands are best friends, and we are godparents to each other's children. I can't even imagine playing with another partner."
Just as the teenage Davis would have never imagined having a decades-long friendship with her then-rival Jordan, the two never pictured themselves playing on the beach.
"It's probably cultural," Davis said when asked why more black women don't play the beach game. "I know, for me, I hated the sand. That was one thing I had to get used to. I used to wipe off the sand as soon as I got it on me.
"Plus, growing up, you would never see me hanging out at the beach. Why would I lay out on the beach for? Water? We don't like to get our hair wet. But I have gotten used to all that, rolling around on the sand and stuff."
Davis said she sees great support on the tour for herself and Jordan.
"When we go to different cities, I see African Americans and other people of color cheering for us," Davis said. "So I hope we are having an impact. We like to show that there are other options for women besides basketball and track."

Superpower falls in semis
Superpower team loses in semifinal
By Mike Scarr / AVP.com
MIAMI -- Misty May-Treanor and Kerri Walsh tasted something they don't very often -- defeat -- and it came at a point even more rare: in a semi-final.
The combo of Elaine Youngs and Nicole Branagh powered their way to a relatively easy, 21-19, 21-19 victory over the top seed at the Cuervo Gold Crown Miami Open on Sunday and earned a berth in the finals against Jennifer Boss and April Ross.
It was only second time in 46 AVP matches that the pair of Walsh and May-Treanor has not reached the final. The last time was the Manhattan Beach Open in 2004.
With a tornado watch in effect, the winds blew hard throughout the match and it seemed to power Branagh and Youngs as well. Play was never halted and Branagh had a kill shot to the back line for match point in Game 1 and then Walsh hit long on the ensuing point as she and May-Treanor went one down.
Branagh and Youngs then led much of the second game but May-Treanor and Walsh fought back and led by two late in the game as Walsh powered a shot past Branagh for a 17-15 advantage.
May-Treanor could not return serve to give Branagh and Youngs match point, 18-20, but her kill in the corner on the next point to side out kept it close at 19-20. Walsh then served but committed a net violation on the block. Game and match went to Branagh and Youngs.
Ross and Boss were 21-14, 21-19 winners over Dianne DeNecochea and Barbra Fontana to advance to the final.
Mike Scarr is a senior reporter for AVP.com.

Notes: Wong accepts role
Happy to play second fiddle to Kiraly
By Mike Scarr / AVP.com
MIAMI -- Every team sport has that less than glamorous role, and Kevin Wong says he will learn to like his.
"You don't think so much -- you're just the big idiot, the big goon," the self-effacing Wong said about his main job as blocker with new partner Karch Kiraly. "You're more like the Shaquille O'Neal, who just gets out there and bangs and doesn't make the finesse shots."
Not that intelligence is a factor. Wong, a former All-America from UCLA, scored a perfect 800 on the math portion of the SAT. But playing with Kiraly requires an element of specialization, and Wong said they blended their talents quickly this weekend's event, their first tournament together.
"It's always been two kinda big guys that hit their jump serve hard," the 2000 Olympian of his previous partners. "Karch is a defensive guy so it makes me go up to the net every time. It's just about getting used to that whole mentality and working hard."
Wong gave most of the credit to their strong showing to Kiraly.
"He makes his partners play really well," Wong said. "He puts the ball right on your hands, right where you expect it to be and you really just rely on and depend on his ball control."
Trends: Kiraly finished fifth here this weekend, the same slot he placed in the season opener last year in Fort Lauderdale. He also took a strikingly similar route.
In 2006, seeded fourth and paired with Larry Witt, Kiraly won his first match but lost the second and was dropped into the contender's bracket. From there, he and Witt reeled off four straight wins before dropping a match to Dain Blanton and Eric Fonoimoana.
This year, Kiraly and Wong won their first match as the 10th seed but dropped their second. Again in the contender's bracket, Kiraly won four matches as he and Wong survived three games in three of them, but they were eliminated by the team of Jake Gibb and Sean Rosenthal, 13-21, 16-21.
"I think we kind of hit the wall a little bit. I don't know if that was mentally or physically," Wong said. "We're a strong passing team but that is what kind of led to our downfall a little bit. But Rosie and Gibb were serving really tough."
Wishful thinking: During the second game of their match Sunday, Mike Lambert shouted to Matt Olson and Jason Ring: "No more lucky breaks, you guys! They're all coming our way."
Lambert and partner Stein Metzger were down a game and were looking at a 15-17 deficit at the time but Olson and Ring held on and pulled out an 18-21 game two victory.
Lucky 13: Olson and Ring were seeded 13th in the tournament and enjoyed some upsets along the way. The lowest seed to advance to the semis since 2005, Olson and Ring took out the No. 4 seed of Matt Fuerbringer and Sean Scott, and then Lambert and Metzger to advance out of the winner's bracket.
But they lost the semifinal to Gibb and Rosenthal, 21-18, 21-15, to finish third.
Home cooking: Misty May-Treanor and partner Kerri Walsh suffered a rare semifinal loss Sunday, only the second time in 46 AVP matches together when they haven't at least reached the final.
But May-Treanor, who lives in Florida during the offseason with husband and Florida Marlins catcher Matt Treanor, still enjoyed playing near home.
"If we could have the whole tour in Florida, I'd love it," May-Treanor said. "It's nice, maybe I could catch more games when my husband was playing. I love Florida and I'm very excited because later we're coming to Tampa."
Cut shots: The top three teams of last year's AVP standings all advanced to the final four in Miami: Phil Dalhausser/Todd Rogers, Gibb/Rosenthal and Metzger/Lambert. ... Jennifer Boss and April Ross, a 10 seed that played in the final, are the lowest seed to reach the semifinals since Jenny Johnson Jordan and Annett Davis at Huntington Beach in 2002. ... May-Treanor had their 39-match winning streak snapped.
Up next: The AVP Crocs Tour moves to Dallas, where qualifying begins for the four-day event Thursday, April 19. After a week break, the tour will stage its first event in California with the Cuervo Gold Crown Huntington Beach Open, May 3-6.

Dalhausser, Rogers extend streak
Down Gibb, Rosenthal in Miami final
By Colleen Murray / AVP.com
MIAMI -- By the end of the men's championship match, someone would be looking at a three-peat. Jake Gibb and partner Sean Rosenthal wanted to continue Gibb's two-year winning streak in AVP openers, but Phil Dalhausser and Todd Rogers won the last two events of last season. The third time would not be a charm for one of them.
By midway through the first game, it was anyone's guess as to whose streak would end. Although Gibb and Rosie led through the first part of the game, Rogers and Dalhausser would not go away. The teams swapped points until Rogers and Dalhausser caught up and tied it at 10.
After their 10th point, Dalhausser's serve trickled over the net, turned the tide and kicked off a 9-3 run. The University of Central Florida product and Rogers took the game, 21-14.
The second game looked a lot like the first. Gibb and Rosenthal again snagged a quick lead. But after Dalhausser and Rogers took a 4-3 lead, the two teams went point-for-point on the next 13 plays. An unbelievable rally, featuring digs by both Rogers and Dalhausser, left Dalhausser with a sandy bald head but ended the string of alternating points. Dalhausser and Rogers pulled away, and even a 5-2 run by Rosenthal and Gibb at the end of the second game wasn't enough to stop Rogers and Dalhausser from winning their third straight tournament.
Road to the championship: The finals offered an opportunity of a rematch for Gibb/Rosenthal. The No. 3 seed faced Dalhausser/Rogers in the fourth round but saw Dalhausser and Rogers cruised through the first game Sunda,21-11. The second game was a different story. Gibb and Rosenthal eventually fell to the contender's bracket after a marathon match with Dalhausser and Rogers ended at 33-31.
To get to the semifinals, Gibb and Rosenthal had to oust the winningest player of all time, Karch Kiraly, and his partner Kevin Wong.
Dalhausser, the reigning best Offensive Player of the AVP and Rogers, the reigning Best Defensive Player, had a relatively smooth trip to the semifinals. They swept Brent Doble and Ty Loomis, dropped the second game to Casey Jennings and Mark Williams but came back and won the third. They then scored a victory over Gibb and Rosenthal.
Semifinals : In the semifinals, Dalhausser and Rogers faced the No. 1 seeded duo of Stein Metzger and Mike Lambert. Dalhausser and Rogers pulled out to an early 10-4 lead and never looked back, winning, 21-15. In the second game, Metzger and Lambert turned the tables. The Crocs Cup champions stayed ahead early by as many as three, but after an amazing dig by Rogers and a Dalhausser block tied the game at 9, Lambert and Metzger never regained the lead.
Gibb and Rosenthal faced No. 13 Matt Olson and Jason Ring, the Cinderella team on the men's side, for a chance to advance to the finals. Gibb and Rosenthal never trailed, but they also never never led by more than three points until the final point and won, 21-17. Last year's Tempe Open champions never let Olson and Ring in the second game and led by as much as nine in the match. Gibb and Rosenthal advanced to the finals on a 21-14 score.
Dalhausser and Rogers look to make it four in a row in Dallas next weekend.
 
Miami's Ultimate Guy and Girl crowned
National final held in Las Vegas in Sept.
By Walter Villa / AVP.com
MIAMI - Vegas, baby, Vegas!
Veronica Trollerud and Paul Christopher are going to Sin City - all expenses paid - after winning the Cuervo Ultimate Girl and Guy contest Sunday at Bicentennial Park. The contest was held in conjunction with the AVP Cuervo Gold Crown Miami Open.
The same contest will be held at each of the next 15 AVP tournaments at cities throughout the United States. In the end, the 32 winners plus two more who will be determined online - go to www.avp.com/cuervo to enter - will be invited to Las Vegas for the pro beach volleyball tournament that will be held Sept. 6-8 at Caesar's Palace.
The Cuervo Ultimate Girl and Guy final will also be held that weekend in Vegas, and the winners will get a spread in Cosmo (male) and Maxim (female). All winners are determined by fans texting from their cell phones.
Scott Geisler, the director of marketing for Cuervo, said that this is the first year his company has held the contest.
"The AVP came to us with this idea for the contest because it sort of fits the Cuervo brand image," Geisler said. "It's really about connecting the two brands - AVP and Cuervo.
"We're sending the message out about having fun, on the beach, the lifestyle; Cuervo fits that scenario really well. We just want everyone to be sensible when they are out partying - be responsible."
Cuervo said the contest is lighthearted.
"It's all tongue in cheek," Geisler said. "If you are a guy or a girl - we are not doing pets - and if you like to have fun on the beach, then come on out. You have to be good looking - sure. But you also need to have some sense of what the volleyball lifestyle is all about."
Trollerud, a 5-foot-6, 115-pounder and a Miami resident, certainly fits that requirement. She is an athletic-looking 25-year-old blonde from Norway who also has Colombian ancestry on her mother's side.
"I've been to Vegas before," said Trollerud, who is a model, owns an event agency and is studying acupuncture and Chinese medicine. "But I can't wait to go back. I am really looking forward to going again."
Christopher, 30, is a 5-10, 170-pound personal trainer from Deerfield Beach, Fl. When asked to do some simple push-ups during the stage portion of Sunday's contest, he impressed the crowd by using only one hand and twisting his body around.
"I showed some creativity with my 'core stability push-ups'," said Christopher, who beat a much larger guy to win the contest. "I didn't think I had a chance in heck in winning. My opponent was quite the Adonis. But David has beaten Goliath!"

Branagh, Youngs take title
Rare final without May-Treanor, Walsh
By Mike Scarr / AVP.com
MIAMI -- There is a first time for everything, and for Nicole Branagh, who partnered with Elaine Youngs, that first was a win.
It was the initial AVP title for Branagh and 36th for Youngs, a 21-19, 21-15 victory over Jennifer Boss and April Ross on Sunday at the Cuervo Gold Crown Miami Open, an achievement worth $20,000 to the winners.
"It is incredible," Branagh said. "I can't say enough about my partner, though. E.Y. served incredibly today to make my job easier."
A steady rain fell throughout the final and grew heavy in the second game as part of a storm system that brought high winds and a tornado watch to the area. Play was never halted.
In the men's final, Todd Rogers and Phil Dalhausser continued their dominance with a win over Jake Gibb and Sean Rosenthal. The pair won eight times last season.
The shock of the tournament came in the semifinals, though, where Misty May-Treanor and Kerri Walsh were unseated by Youngs and Branagh in a relatively easy, 21-19, 21-19 victory.
It was only second time in 46 AVP matches that the pair of Walsh and May-Treanor has not reached the final. The last time was the Manhattan Beach Open in 2004.
"It feels like it's been that long," Walsh said. "It feels that heavy right now."
The weather and stout winds seemed to power Branagh and Youngs all day.
Playing from behind for much of the first game of the women's final, Youngs and Branagh finally caught Boss and Ross at 15 after four unanswered points. Spirited rallies at one point featured four straight kills, two from each team. After tying the game at 15, a Branagh winner and a Branagh block built a 17-15 advantage.
A block by Boss evened the score at 17 but Branagh and Youngs reached match point on consecutive kills, first by Branagh and then by Youngs. Ross/Boss pulled within a point but Branagh put away the game-winner with a kill to go one up in the match.
Youngs' experience began to show in the second game and she and Branagh began to exert their control.
Ross and Boss caught them at 12 with a Boss kill and took a 14-13 lead with another kill by Boss. But Branagh and Youngs then ran off seven straight points with a Branagh putaway and then a block for match point at 20-14.
After a Ross kill, Branagh put away match point to claim the title.
"EY was the difference," Ross said. "She's won 35 tournaments."
It was the latest of wins for Branagh and Youngs on the day.
In Game 1 of their semifinal match with May-Treanor and Walsh, Branagh had a kill shot to the back line for match point in Game 1 and then Walsh hit long on the ensuing point as she and May-Treanor went one down.
Branagh and Youngs then led much of the second game but May-Treanor and Walsh fought back and led by two late in the game as Walsh powered a shot past Branagh for a 17-15 advantage.
May-Treanor could not return serve to give Branagh and Youngs a match point at 18-20, but her kill in the corner on the next point to side out kept it close at 19-20. Walsh then served but committed a net violation on the block. Game and match went to Branagh and Youngs. Both of Youngs' titles were against May-Treanor and Walsh last season.
"I think they served pretty tough and used the wind to their advantage, but no, it was me," Walsh said. "I wasn't really too sharp there and when you make a mistake you want to fix it right away, and that's not how it happens."
May-Treanor came into the season opener with the Holly McPeak's record of 72 individual titles within reach. Sitting on 69, May-Treanor was in a good position to break the mark early in the year, especially since she and Walsh have opened each of the last four seasons with at least four victories.
Now they're looking to regroup.
"It's the first event, and we have a long way to go and we get to play next weekend," Walsh said. "I kind of got in my own way and I didn't want to make a mistake and you can't play like that. Michael Jordan always wants the ball. He would shoot himself out of a slump and that's what I've got to do."
Youngs has no doubt they'll emerge from the defeat hungry.
"I've got to win a lot more to have their number," Youngs said. "I've probably got the most second place finishes against them. What it boils down to is taking care of our side of the net. I expect them to be ticked off in Dallas."
To reach the other side of the final Ross and Boss used a two-game, 21-14, 21-19, victory over Dianne DeNecochea and Barbra Fontana.
May-Treanor and Walsh advanced to the semi-final with a 21-15, 21-15 victory over Tyra Turner and Rachel Wacholder. After falling to the contender's bracket with their early morning loss to Boss and Ross, Branagh and Youngs turned out a 21-11, 21-16 victory over Angie Akers and Brooke Hanson to reach the semis and ultimately a berth in the finals.
Mike Scarr is a senior reporter for AVP.com.

May-Treanor nears McPeak's record
Semifinal loss in Miami keeps her at 69
By Monique Moyal / AVP.com
MIAMI -- At 69 all-time beach volleyball titles, Misty May-Treanor is only four away from surpassing Holly McPeak's record of 72.
And one tournament into the 2007 season with a third-place finish under her belt, May-Treanor says that is the last thing on her mind right now.
"You know if I never make it, it's like the last thought going through my head," said May-Treanor. "You know you just wanna see people doing well across the board and when Kerri and I are done playing and some of the older players are done playing, you want the younger players to keep the sport alive."
Her egalitarian approach to the young season has a lot to do with the shakeups and upsets across the brackets in the Cuervo Gold Crown Miami Open in Miami, Fla., last weekend -- Elaine Youngs and Nicole Branagh's win to send May-Treanor and Walsh packing in the semifinals. (21-19, 21-19).
On the other side of the bracket, No. 11 April Ross and Jennifer Boss shrugged off the higher-seeded competition as the only undefeated team on the women's side until the finals. In Miami, they finished second at the hands of Youngs and Branagh 21-19 and 21-15 in their first championship round together -- the first time a team seeded lower than 10th made it to the finals since 2001.
And the former USC Trojans were not a planned pair for the 2007 season, but thanks to injuries and international play, Boss and Ross seemed to have found quite the winning competition early in the season. And it probably doesn't hurt that they trained against May-Treanor and Walsh before this tournament.
"We practiced against Jen and April, and I think they're a great team," said May-Treanor. "I mean I don't know what's going to happen in tournaments to come, because I know they're waiting for different players to come back, but I think they're a very good team and they're getting better."
On Saturday, Boss and Ross sent Youngs and Branagh to the contender's bracket, but as chance would have it, the two faced off hungry for either vengeance or respect in the final round. Vengeance turned out to be the name of the game as Youngs / Branagh, Boss / Ross and May-Treanor / Walsh were the only three women's teams to lose one match.
Even before a premature dropoff for the No. 1 seed, Youngs shares May-Treanor's selfless vision of the tour this year, as epitomized by the final results in Miami.
"I equate [Misty] to Karch in the women's game she's just got the whole package," Youngs said. "And I think it's great, I mean Holly's held [the record] for a long time and it's an amazing feat given her height and everything else. And I think it's great for beach volleyball, giving it a lot of attention and she's gonna top that a whole lot longer. It's a great achievement and … I just have a ton of respect."
While May-Treanor is not thinking too hard about her own individual record on the AVP Crocs Tour, she is focusing on the long-term goal of entering the 2008 Olympics in Beijing. Part of her training for the rest of the AVP season and the Olympic Trials took place in the off-season, when she and Walsh signed on a new coach to help with their rhythm.
"That's our biggest goal, and these are little steps along the way just to get better and improve upon, but you know, obviously we want another gold medal," May-Treanor said.
Even though May-Treanor is not thinking about her win total in the front of her mind, there's someone else who is. Youngs promises to be working hard all season long to hold her off for a little bit longer, as she did in the semi-finals on Sunday.
"I think in general we're gonna be there every weekend -- I expect to be challenging all of the teams," Youngs said. "But Kerri and Misty are gonna have their work cut out for them this year -- it's not going to be enough for them to walk through people. … But yeah, of course, I'd like her to hold off, but it's inevitable."
If May-Treanor and Walsh continue to play the way they have been, only missing one championship round since the 2004 Manhattan Beach Open, there is no reason why she should not reach 73 titles well before her 30th birthday in July.
Youngs and Branagh, however, will be there challenging that run.
"It's finally our time!" she screamed to a group of her cheering fans after gaining entry into the semifinal round on Sunday morning.

Lambert, Metzger tie for 3rd in beach volleyball event
Advertiser Staff
Punahou School alums Mike Lambert and Stein Metzger lost in the semifinals of the $200,000 AVP Cuervo Gold Crown Miami Open today.
Phil Dalhausser and Todd Rogers, seeded second, ousted the top-seeded duo of Lambert and Metzger, 21-14, 21-19. Lambert and Metzger earned $9,500 for finishing in a tie for third.
Dalhausser and Rogers beat third-seeded Jake Gibb and Sean Rosenthal, 21-14, 21-18, for the championship and the $20,000 winners' prize. Gibb and Rosenthal beat Matt Olson and former Rainbow Jason Ring, 21-18, 21-15, to reach the final.

May-Treanor, Walsh look for revenge
Kiraly makes final competitive trip to Texas
By Colleen Murray / AVP.com
As hard as it may be to believe, the last time an AVP event was in Dallas, Misty May-Treanor and Kerri Walsh were just gleams in the AVP's eye. Plenty has changed since 1998, and May-Treanor and Walsh have now firmly established themselves as the top team on tour.
May-Treanor and Walsh now have a score to settle as they head to Texas. The two fell to eventual champions Elaine Youngs and Nicole Branagh in the Miami Open semifinal Sunday. This loss marked the first time since 2004 that the Olympians didn't make it to the last game.
May-Treanor and Walsh are notorious for playing with a vengeance after not making -- or losing -- a final game. Women's teams should be on the lookout for May-Treanor and Walsh to come back swinging.
Another source of competition that will garner attention is the combination of April Ross and Jennifer Boss. Ross and Boss are a makeshift partnership of sorts. Ross's original partner, Nancy Mason, suffered an injury, and Boss's original partner, Keao Burdine, is finishing out her season in Puerto Rico. If Burdine and Mason do return, will Boss and Ross go back to their original game plans, even after their successful performance together?
The top three teams on tour -- Stein Metzger/Mike Lambert, Todd Rogers/Phil Dalhausser and Jake Gibb/Sean Rosenthal -- proved why belonged at the top and why they, unlike the majority of the teams on tour, chose to keep their teams intact.
All four top-seeded teams made semifinals for only the 11th time since 2001, with Dalhausser and Rogers eventually taking the title. Look for Rogers to try and use his experience to make him the wiser in Dallas. When the event last came around in 1998, Rogers lost in the finals.
On the men's side, expect the new teams to try to make up for their lack of familiarity with their partners on the court as soon as possible to end the domination of returning partnerships.
Karch Kiraly will be a face to watch in Dallas. He and partner Kevin Wong recorded a 5th place finish in Miami, the first open of his last season playing on the AVP tour.
Kiraly scored back-to-back wins in Dallas and hopes to add another in his last competitive trip to the Texas city.

Ross bested in women's final
VOLLEYBALL: Newport Harbor product, partner settle for second in AVP opener. May-Treanor, Walsh fall in semifinals.
MIAMI — A Newport Harbor High product reached the women's final of the Cuervo Gold Crown Miami Open — the opener of the 2007 Assn. of Volleyball Professionals tour on Sunday — but it might not be the one most people expected.
Former Sailors' star April Ross, the AVP Rookie of the Year last season when she finished no higher than ninth place, teamed with Jennifer Boss to reach the title match, before falling, 21-19, 21-15, to Nicole Branagh and Elaine Youngs.
Branagh and Youngs defeated Newport Harbor product Misty May-Treanor and Kerri Walsh, 21-19, 21-19, in the semifinals earlier Sunday.
The semifinal loss broke a seven-tournament AVP winning streak for May-Treanor and Walsh, who won 36 straight matches to end the 2006 beach volleyball campaign. May-Treanor and Walsh, who have been named AVP Team of the Year the last four seasons, won 13 of 15 AVP tournaments last season.
Costa Mesa resident Jake Gibb teamed with Sean Rosenthal to reach the men's final. But they lost, 21-14, 21-19, to Phil Dalhausser and Todd Rogers, who shared the $20,000 first prize.
Costa Mesa resident Mike Lambert, who along with Stein Metzger was the No. 1 seeded team, lost to Dalhausser and Rogers, 21-14, 21-19, in the semifinals earlier Sunday. They shared $9.500.
Ross, who played with Keo Burdine last season, nearly equaled her AVP career earnings by collecting her half of the $15,000 runner-up purse. The 6-foot-1 Ross, 24, who earned national player of the year honors at Newport Harbor and USC, made $7,787.50 on the beach last season.
Estancia High product Matt Fuerbringer and partner Sean Scott shared 13th place ($1,700), in the men's event, in which former Newport Harbor setter Ty Tramblie teamed with Mike Morrison to share 17th ($800).
The tour continues with the Dallas Open, another Cuervo Gold Crown event, Thursday through Sunday at the Ballpark in Arlington.

Branagh-Youngs duo take Miami Open
AVP: Tandem wins rare crown as No. 1 team ousted.
Article Launched: 04/15/2007 11:19:01 PM PDT
MIAMI - There is a first time for everything, and for Nicole Branagh, who partnered with Elaine Youngs, that first was a win.
It was the initial AVP title for Branagh and 36th for Youngs, a 21-19, 21-15 victory over Jennifer Boss and April Ross on Sunday at the Cuervo Gold Crown Miami Open, an achievement worth $20,000 to the winners.
"It is incredible," Branagh said. "I can't say enough about my partner, though. E.Y. served incredibly today to make my job easier."
A steady rain fell throughout the final and grew heavy in the second game as part of a storm system that brought high winds and a tornado watch to the area. Play was never halted.
In the men's final, Todd Rogers and Phil Dalhausser continued their dominance with a win over Jake Gibb and Sean Rosenthal. The pair won eight times last season.
The shock of the tournament came in the semifinals, though, where Misty May-Treanor and Kerri Walsh were unseated by Youngs and Branagh in a relatively easy, 21-19, 21-19 victory.
It was only second time in 46 AVP matches that the pair of Walsh and May-Treanor has not reached the final. The last time was the Manhattan Beach Open in 2004.
"It feels like it's been that long," Walsh
said. "It feels that heavy right now."
May-Treanor came into the season opener with the Holly McPeak's record of 72 individual titles within reach.
- Courtesy AVP.com

Youngs, Branagh take women's Cuervo crown
By Sharon Robb
South Florida Sun-Sentinel
Posted April 16 2007
After knocking off top-seeds Misty May-Treanor of Coral Springs and Kerri Walsh, the second-seeded team of Elaine Youngs and Nicole Branagh went on to win their first title as a team Sunday at the AVP Cuervo Gold Crown season-opener at windy Bicentennial Park in Miami.
Youngs and Branagh upended May-Treanor and Walsh in the semifinal 21-19, 21-19 and defeated No. 11 seeds Jennifer Boss and April Ross in the final 21-19, 21-15.
LocalLinks
The win is Branagh's first in her pro career.
"I knew that we were going to be good, but I didn't know it would come this quickly," Youngs said. "We have a lot to live up to for the rest of the season."
In 46 AVP tournaments, May-Treanor and Walsh had missed only one final, their last loss coming in a semifinal in 2004.
In the men's final, University of Central Florida alum Phil Dalhausser and Todd Rogers defeated Jake Gibb and Sean Rosenthal 21-14, 21-18.
Former St. Thomas and Douglas player George Roumain and John Hyden got knocked out by Karch Kiraly and Kevin Wong 14-21, 21-17, 15-13.
 
Volleyball: No. 2 seeds take Miami title
Click-2-Listen
By Andy Kent
Special to The Palm Beach Post
Monday, April 16, 2007
MIAMI — With winds swirling and rain coming down at Bicentennial Park, Phil Dalhausser and Todd Rogers took a while to find their rhythm Sunday in the finale of the AVP Cuervo Gold Crown Miami Open.
Once they did, the No. 2 seeds couldn't be stopped on their way to a 21-14, 21-18 win over No. 3 Jake Gibb and Sean Rosenthal.
"They started off hot or you could say we started off cold, whichever way you want to look at it, in the first and second game because we were down 3-0 both times," said Rogers. "We steadied out, we didn't charge back but we didn't give up a bunch of points and then found our rhythm."
On the women's side, Nicole Branagh teamed with Elaine Youngs to capture her first tour victory.
They beat top-seeded Misty May-Treanor and Kerri Walsh in the semifinals, then disposed of No. 11 Jennifer Boss and April Moss 21-19, 21-15 in the final.
By defeating May-Traynor and Walsh, 21-19, 21-19, Branagh and Youngs, the No. 2 seeds, prevented them from reaching the finals for the first time since 2004.

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April 19th-22nd, 2007 Men's $100,000 AVP Cuervo Gold Crown Dallas Open at Rangers Ballpark in Arlington,TX
 
   
         
                  Arlington Texas Rangers Ballpark


  AVP Tour Event Coverage AVPtourlogo6.gif



Arlington Stadium Facts and Figures
 
Tenant: Texas Rangers
Capacity: 10,500 (original), 43,521 (final)
Surface: Grass
Cost: $1.9 Million, $19 Million (expansions)
Opened: April 21, 1972 (MLB)
Closed: October 3, 1993
Demolished: 1993
 Dimensions: 330-L, 400-C, 330-R (original and final)
Architect: Unknown
Location: Center of parking lot of Six Flags bound by Stadium Drive, Randol Mill Rd., Pennant Rd., & I-30.

Rangers Ballpark in Arlington
1901 Road to Six Flags
Arlington, TX 76011

Rangers Ballpark in Arlington is located about 30 minutes west of Dallas on Interstate 30.

Click Here For Map

Directions:

FROM DALLAS
Alternative 1: I-30 west to Six Flags Drive exit. Continue on Six Flags Drive to Randol Mill Road, turn right and proceed to parking lots.

Alternative 2: Highway 183 west to Highway 360 south. Exit Randol Mill Road, turn right (west) and proceed to parking lots.

Alternative 3: I-30 west to Ballpark Way exit. Go south (right) and proceed to parking lots.

FROM DFW AIRPORT
Alternative 1: Hwy. 360 south to Brown Blvd. exit. Go right (west) to Stadium Drive. Turn left (south) and proceed to parking lots.

Alternative 2: Hwy. 360 south to Lamar Blvd. exit. Go right (west) to Ballpark Way. Turn left (south) and proceed to parking lots.

Alternative 3: Hwy. 360 south to Division Street exit. Go right (west) to Stadium Drive. Turn right (north) on Stadium Drive and proceed to parking lots.

FROM FORT WORTH
Alternative 1: I-30 east to Nolan Ryan Expressway exit. Go south and proceed to parking lots.

Alternative 2: I-30 east to Collins Street exit. Go south on Collins to Road to Six Flags. Turn left (east) and proceed to parking lots.

Alternative 3: I-30 east to Cooper street exit. Go south to Randol Mill Road. Turn left (east) and proceed to parking lots.

FROM IRVING AND MIDCITIES
Alternative 1: Hwy. 183 to FM 157 south. Continue on FM 157 (Collins Street) to Road to Six Flags. Turn left (east) and proceed to parking lots.

Alternative 2: Hwy. 183 to FM 157 south. Continue to FM 157(Collins Street) to Randol Mill Road. Turn left (east) and proceed to parking lots.

FROM SOUTH ARLINGTON
Alternative 1: Hwy. 360 north to Division Street. Go left (west) on Division to Stadium Drive. Turn right (north) and proceed to parking lots.

Alternative 2: Hwy. 360 north to Randol Mill Road exit. Turn left (west) on Randol Mill and proceed to parking lots.


Past History Of The AVP's Last Event In Dallas,Texas:
 June 05th-06th,1999   $75,000  AVP Sunkist Tournament of Champions at West End(Dallas, TX)
West End
13th- Bill Boullianne/Ian Clark           $ 1,025

Friederischson and Boldt played very well and sent Boulliane and Clark
home after they had survived a Bye in the first round.
Frederichson/Boldt def Boulliane/Clark 15-7

In the Finals for the 3rd time this season: (The Rubber Match)
Kiraly/Johnson vs Fonoimoana/Blanton.Karch ties Sinjin Smith's All-Time tournament win record!
Kiraly and Johnson defeated Fonoimoana & Blanton 15-4, in a hot final..Karch is now only one victory from tying Sinjin Smith's career victory mark of 139. Congrats Karch!

Men's $75,000 AVP/Sunkist Tournament of Champions
June 5-6, 1999 Dallas, Texas 
Finish Player Partner Seed Winnings  
1 Adam Johnson Karch Kiraly 1 $18,000.00  
2 Dain Blanton Eric Fonoimoana 3 $10,000.00  
3 Jose Loiola Emanuel Rego 2 $6,000.00  
3 Brian Lewis Mike Whitmarsh 4 $6,000.00  
5 Nick Hannemann Henry Russell 5 $3,500.00  
5 Brent Frohoff Ricci Luyties 6 $3,500.00  
5 Brent Doble Lee LeGrande 7 $3,500.00  
5 Eduardo Bacil Carlos Loss 8 $3,500.00  
9 Rifat Agi Steve Simpson   $2,000.00  
9 Richard Boldt Scott Friederichsen   $2,000.00  
9 Canyon Ceman Adam Jewell   $2,000.00  
9 Dax Holdren Todd Rogers   $2,000.00  
13 Bartosz Bachorski Janusz Bulkowski   $1,026.00  
13 Bill Boullianne Ian Clark   $1,026.00  
13 Paul Boyd John Hribar   $1,026.00  
13 Dan Castillo Leland Quinn   $1,026.00  
13 Peter Goers Aaron Smith   $1,026.00  
13 Mark Kerins Kevin Martin   $1,026.00  
13 Mark Paaluhi Wayne Seligson   $1,026.00  
13 Sean Scott Matt Unger   $1,026.00  
21 Daniel Cardenas Jim Nichols   $400.00  
21 Ran Kumgisky Tom Slauterbeck   $400.00  
21 Masui Allen Alika Williams   $400.00  
21 John Anselmo Jason Pursley   $400.00  
21 Paul Baxter Nathan Heidger   $400.00  
21 Jeff Bellandi Curtis Rollins   $400.00  
21 Scott Davenport Collin Smith   $400.00  
21 Pepe Delahoz Brad Torsone   $400.00  
21 David Fischer Brian MacDonald   $400.00  
21 Jerry Graham Chris Makos   $400.00  
21 Albert Hannemann Bryan Ivie   $400.00  
21 Gaston Macau Dan Ortega   $400.00  

Kiraly/Johnson 1st at Dallas


AVP on DVD
BUY ONE GET ONE FREE!!!
                                                                              .



-Buy (1)  Veriuni Nutritional Supplement below and get (1) FREE DVD of the 2007 AVP Pro Beach Volleyball Tour Quervo Gold Crown Dallas,Texas Open
  April 19th - April 22nd,2007  Men's & Women's Finals on a single DVD disc as our GIFT to you.

FOX SPORTS NET



Veriuni Nutritional Supplements:
Single Item Order
  (1) 32 Oz. Bottle-30 day supply-Veriuni Advanced Liquid Nutrition Item/Id#25 
Cost $ 32.99



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Enjoy a great tasting peach flavor while loading your body with over 127 nutrients. Veriuni advanced liquid nutrition absorbs into the body quickly and effectively. Experience the VERIUNI difference.
 
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The Veriuni Advanced Liquid Nutrition formulation is different than any other health product and we predict it will quickly become the best selling liquid nutritional product in the world.


Veriuni Nutritional Supplements:
Single Item Order 
(1)Bottle 60 Capsules-30 day supply-Veriuni Advanced Antioxidant with red wine extract - Item/Id#26
Cost $32.99

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addtocartvstore1.gif Veriuni Store
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                                                           VeriSign Secure Online Ordering


The potential benefits of antioxidants has been well documented through years of scientific research.  Veriuni didn’t just stop with traditional antioxidants; we went a step further and included a red-wine extract, to create a very potent antioxidant. Experience the VERIUNI difference.I already take a daily multi-vitamin, why do I need to take an antioxidant?
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To boost your energy levels and healthy lifestyle, check out Veriuni's Advanced Antioxidant with Red Wine Extract. One dose (two capsules) of the Veriuni antioxidant includes 500 mg of Vitamin C, 400 IU of Vitamin E, and 50 mg of red wine extract.
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Note*: Liquid Nutrition can now be shipped to many different countries,shipping and handling fees apply,see drop down list when ordering.

Note*: AVP on DVD disc may be shipped separately from your order and is simply our GIFT to you,you are purchasing the nutritional supplement only and not the DVD.

Note*: Unca Nick Productions & IanClarkVolleyball.net are not affiliated with the AVP Association Of Volleyball Professionals in any shape or form regarding this promotion.

Unca Nick Productions
Get in touch with me by email. mailto:spiro@monmouth.com


Event Dates
2007 AVP Tour Schedule
Date Event Prize Site Tickets Info
2007 AVP Schedule
April 13 - 15--Miami, FL
April 19 - 22--Dallas, TX
May 3 - 6--Huntington Beach, CA
May 10 - 13--Glendale, AZ
May 17 - 20--Hermosa Beach, CA
May 24 - 27--Louisville, KY
May 31-Jun 3--Tampa, FL
June 14 - 17--Charleston, SC
July 5 - 8--Seaside Heights, NJ
July 19 - 22--Long Beach, CA
Aug 2 - 5--Chicago, IL
Aug 9 - 12--Manhattan Beach, CA
Aug 16 - 19--Boston, MA
Aug 23 - 26--Brooklyn, NY
Aug 30-Sept 2--Cincinnati OH
Sept 6 - 8--Las Vegas, NV
Sept 14 - 16--San Francisco, CA

Men's $100,000 AVP Cuervo Gold Crown Dallas Open

April 19-22, 2007 

Event Information

Main Draw
•  24 Teams, 7 Courts
•  18 automatic entries, 2 wildcards

Qualifier
•  32 Men's and Women's teams
•  4 teams advance via Qualifier

Finals
•  MEN: 4:00 p.m. on Saturday 4/21
•  WOMEN: 12:15 p.m. on Sunday 4/22

Youth Clinics
Hilton AVP Youth Indoor to Outdoor Transition Clinics are for all volleyball players between the ages of 12-18. Clinics are held onsite at AVP events and are free.
Download Registration Form to Sign Up!
•  Dallas Youth Clinic Form
   [Microsoft Word Document]

Tickets:

Men's and Women's Main Draw Competition
Friday, April 20, 2007
8:00 a.m.
 
Saturday, April 21, 2007
10:00 a.m.
 
Sunday, April 22, 2007
8:30 a.m.

Ticket Prices
Sections Price
Courtside General Admission $35.00
Grandstand General Admission $15.00
* Must be 18 years of age or younger and present valid school ID 
  
Print Tickets at Home
Print your AVP Cuervo Gold Crown Dallas tickets at home after you make your purchase from avp.com!
Find out how >

GA Group Tickets
Coming soon.
 


Schedule:

Thursday, April 19, 2007
Men's and Women's Qualifier Competition
Gates open at 8:00 a.m.
Competition start time 8:00 a.m.
Competition End Time (Approx) 6:00 p.m.
Free Admission
 
Friday, April 20, 2007
Men's and Women's Main Draw Competition
Gates open at 7:30 a.m.
Competition start time 8:00 a.m.
Competition End Time (Approx) 6:00 p.m.

Saturday, April 21, 2007
Men's and Women's Main Draw Competition
Gates open at 9:30 a.m.
Competition start time 10:00 a.m.
Men's Finals 4:00 p.m.
Competition End Time (Approx) 6:00 p.m.

Sunday, April 22, 2007
Men's and Women's Main Draw Competition
Gates open at 8:00 a.m.
Competition start time 8:30 a.m.
Women's Finals 12:15 p.m.
Competition End Time (Approx) 3:15 p.m.

Men's Entries:

Men's $100,000 AVP Cuervo Gold Crown Dallas Open
April 19-22, 2007 
Finish Player Partner Seed  
 
Jeff Carlucci Adam Roberts Q1  
  Mike Morrison Ty Tramblie Q2  
  David Fischer Scott Hill Q3  
  Billy Allen AJ Mihalic Q4  
  Dane Jensen Mike Placek Q5  
  Vincent Robbins Jason Wight Q6  
  Leonardo Moraes Jim Nichols Q7  
  Jon Mesko Eyal Zimet Q8  
  Chris Harger Jesse Webster Q9  
  Chad Mowrey Kimo Tuyay Q10  
  Russ Marchewka Fernando Sabla Q11  
  Erik Gomez Lucas Wisniakowski Q12  
  Seth Burnham Tony Pray Q13  
  Rico Becker Mike Bruning Q14  
  Matt Ogin Todd Strassberger Q15  
  Pete DiVenere Justin Phipps Q16  
  Joaquin Acosta Gaston Macau Q17  
  Everett Matthews Ivan Mercer Q18  
  Guy Hamilton Andrew Vazquez Q19  
  Yariv Lerner Rob McNaughton Q20  
  Brandon Lamb Vince Zanzucchi Q21  
  Shane Nelson Brian Post Q22  
  Matt McKinney Jeff Murrell Q23  
  Esteban Escobar Jeff Smith Q24  
  Nate Hagstrom Tim May Q25  
  Mike Desjardins Paul McDonald Q26  
  Drew Hamilton Travis Regner Q27  
  Skyler Davis Derek Zimmerman Q28  
  Bivin Sadler Andy Shean Q29  
  Chad Borton Richard Rainwater Q30  
  LV Hanson Lance Kobza Q31  
  Richard Crouse Dan Stubinski Q32  
  Will Johnson Kyle Patton Q33  
  Steven Buesing Steve Ramey Q34  
  Greg Arentz Jaime Calata Q35  
  Tom Chapman Kyle Kennedy Q36  
  Tom Lovelace Randy Meador Q37  
  Derek Bond Steve Sheppard Q38  
  Daniel Lindsey Dewain Martin Q39  
  Jay Novacek Curtis Pitts Q40  
  Caine Cambron Thomas Oley Q41  
  Carlos Andrade Jerry McCoy Q42  
  Dain Blanton Canyon Ceman    
  Phil Dalhausser Todd Rogers    
  Brent Doble Ty Loomis    
  Matt Fuerbringer Sean Scott    
  Jake Gibb Sean Rosenthal    
  Albert Hannemann Ed Ratledge    
  Dax Holdren Jeff Nygaard    
  John Hyden George Roumain    
  Casey Jennings Mark Williams    
  Adam Jewell Jose Loiola    
  Brad Keenan John Mayer    
  Karch Kiraly Kevin Wong    
  Mike Lambert Stein Metzger    
  Jason Lee Chad Turner    
  Nick Lucena Will Strickland    
  Ryan Mariano Larry Witt    
  Anthony Medel Fred Souza    
  Matt Olson Jason Ring    
  Austin Rester Aaron Wachtfogel    
  Hans Stolfus Scott Wong    

Men's $100,000 AVP Cuervo Gold Crown Dallas Open
April 19-22, 2007  

Qualifier Bracket
Round 1
Match 2: Will Johnson / Kyle Patton (Q33) def. Richard Crouse / Dan Stubinski (Q32) 21-18, 21-16 (0:42)
Match 6: Esteban Escobar / Jeff Smith (Q24) def. Caine Cambron / Thomas Oley (Q41) 21-17, 21-9 (0:37)
Match 7: Nate Hagstrom / Tim May (Q25) def. Jay Novacek / Curtis Pitts (Q40) 21-7, 21-6 (0:33)
Match 10: Skyler Davis / Derek Zimmerman (Q28) def. Tom Lovelace / Randy Meador (Q37) 21-12, 22-20 (0:44)
Match 15: Bivin Sadler / Andy Shean (Q29) def. Tom Chapman / Kyle Kennedy (Q36) 21-16, 21-17 (0:42)
Match 18: Greg Arentz / Jaime Calata (Q35) def. Chad Borton / Richard Rainwater (Q30) 21-11, 21-18 (0:38)
Match 23: Drew Hamilton / Travis Regner (Q27) def. Derek Bond / Steve Sheppard (Q38) 17-21, 21-18, 15-12 (1:01)
Match 26: Mike Desjardins / Paul McDonald (Q26) def. Daniel Lindsey / Dewain Martin (Q39) 19-21, 21-13, 15-6 (0:54)
Match 27: Matt McKinney / Jeff Murrell (Q23) def. Carlos Andrade / Jerry McCoy (Q42) 21-8, 21-4 (0:32)
Match 31: LV Hanson / Lance Kobza (Q31) def. Steven Buesing / Steve Ramey (Q34) 21-15, 21-14 (0:43)

Round 2
Match 33: Jeff Carlucci / Adam Roberts (Q1) def. Will Johnson / Kyle Patton (Q33) 21-12, 21-15 (0:36)
Match 34: Joaquin Acosta / Gaston Macau (Q17) def. Pete DiVenere / Justin Phipps (Q16) 22-20, 21-15 (0:45)
Match 35: Esteban Escobar / Jeff Smith (Q24) def. Chris Harger / Jesse Webster (Q9) 21-11, 21-13 (0:45)
Match 36: Jon Mesko / Eyal Zimet (Q8) def. Nate Hagstrom / Tim May (Q25) 21-10, 21-13 (0:34)
Match 37: Skyler Davis / Derek Zimmerman (Q28) def. Dane Jensen / Mike Placek (Q5) 15-21, 21-17, 15-13 (0:57)
Match 38: Erik Gomez / Lucas Wisniakowski (Q12) def. Brandon Lamb / Vince Zanzucchi (Q21) 22-24, 28-26, 15-7 (1:10)
Match 39: Seth Burnham / Tony Pray (Q13) def. Yariv Lerner / Rob McNaughton (Q20) 21-19, 21-14 (0:45)
Match 40: Billy Allen / AJ Mihalic (Q4) def. Bivin Sadler / Andy Shean (Q29) 21-13, 21-17 (0:39)
Match 41: David Fischer / Scott Hill (Q3) def. Greg Arentz / Jaime Calata (Q35) 21-17, 21-15 (0:37)
Match 42: Rico Becker / Mike Bruning (Q14) def. Guy Hamilton / Andrew Vazquez (Q19) 21-15, 21-13 (0:43)
Match 43: Russ Marchewka / Fernando Sabla (Q11) def. Shane Nelson / Brian Post (Q22) 21-14, 21-15 (0:40)
Match 44: Vincent Robbins / Jason Wight (Q6) def. Drew Hamilton / Travis Regner (Q27) 27-25, 21-11 (0:47)
Match 45: Leonardo Moraes / Jim Nichols (Q7) def. Mike Desjardins / Paul McDonald (Q26) 21-16, 21-15 (0:44)
Match 46: Matt McKinney / Jeff Murrell (Q23) def. Chad Mowrey / Kimo Tuyay (Q10) 12-21, 21-18, 15-13 (0:58)
Match 47: Everett Matthews / Ivan Mercer (Q18) def. Matt Ogin / Todd Strassberger (Q15) 21-19, 21-17 (0:51)
Match 48: Mike Morrison / Ty Tramblie (Q2) def. LV Hanson / Lance Kobza (Q31) 21-12, 16-21, 15-7 (1:01)

Round 3
Match 49: Joaquin Acosta / Gaston Macau (Q17) def. Jeff Carlucci / Adam Roberts (Q1) 26-24, 19-21, 15-13 (1:25)
Match 50: Jon Mesko / Eyal Zimet (23, Q8) def. Esteban Escobar / Jeff Smith (Q24) 21-16, 21-17 (0:49)
Match 51: Skyler Davis / Derek Zimmerman (24, Q28) def. Erik Gomez / Lucas Wisniakowski (Q12) 21-19, 21-15 (0:43)
Match 52: Seth Burnham / Tony Pray (Q13) def. Billy Allen / AJ Mihalic (Q4) 21-16, 21-17 (0:48)
Match 53: David Fischer / Scott Hill (22, Q3) def. Rico Becker / Mike Bruning (Q14) 13-21, 21-18, 15-9 (0:55)
Match 54: Russ Marchewka / Fernando Sabla (Q11) def. Vincent Robbins / Jason Wight (Q6) 21-14, 24-22 (0:51)
Match 55: Leonardo Moraes / Jim Nichols (Q7) def. Matt McKinney / Jeff Murrell (Q23) 21-12, 22-20 (0:51)
Match 56: Mike Morrison / Ty Tramblie (21, Q2) def. Everett Matthews / Ivan Mercer (Q18) 21-12, 21-15 (0:48)

Round 4
Match 57: Jon Mesko / Eyal Zimet (23, Q8) def. Joaquin Acosta / Gaston Macau (Q17) 21-14, 21-12 (0:41)
Match 58: Skyler Davis / Derek Zimmerman (24, Q28) def. Seth Burnham / Tony Pray (Q13) 21-17, 21-19 (0:46)
Match 59: David Fischer / Scott Hill (22, Q3) def. Russ Marchewka / Fernando Sabla (Q11) 19-21, 21-16, 15-12 (1:02)
Match 60: Mike Morrison / Ty Tramblie (21, Q2) def. Leonardo Moraes / Jim Nichols (Q7) 21-19, 21-18 (0:47)


Winner's Bracket
Round 1
Match 1: Albert Hannemann / Ed Ratledge (17) def. Dain Blanton / Canyon Ceman (16) 21-16, 21-18 (0:50)
Match 2: Matt Olson / Jason Ring (9) def. Skyler Davis / Derek Zimmerman (24, Q28) 21-17, 21-16 (0:42)
Match 3: Hans Stolfus / Scott Wong (12) def. Mike Morrison / Ty Tramblie (21, Q2) 21-11, 21-11 (0:43)
Match 4: Nick Lucena / Will Strickland (13) def. Adam Jewell / Jose Loiola (20) 16-21, 21-11, 15-13 (1:02)
Match 5: Austin Rester / Aaron Wachtfogel (14) def. Jason Lee / Chad Turner (19) 21-19, 17-21, 15-12 (1:05)
Match 6: Ryan Mariano / Larry Witt (11) def. David Fischer / Scott Hill (22, Q3) 21-14, 21-12 (0:44)
Match 7: Karch Kiraly / Kevin Wong (10) def. Jon Mesko / Eyal Zimet (23, Q8) 21-15, 21-11 (0:40)
Match 8: Brad Keenan / John Mayer (18) def. Brent Doble / Ty Loomis (15) 17-21, 26-24, 20-18 (1:24)

Round 2
Match 9: Albert Hannemann / Ed Ratledge (17) def. Mike Lambert / Stein Metzger (1) 15-21, 21-19, 15-12 (1:07)
Match 10: Matt Olson / Jason Ring (9) def. John Hyden / George Roumain (8) 21-16, 21-16 (0:50)
Match 11: Hans Stolfus / Scott Wong (12) def. Dax Holdren / Jeff Nygaard (5) 22-20, 24-26, 15-12 (1:27)
Match 12: Matt Fuerbringer / Sean Scott (4) def. Nick Lucena / Will Strickland (13) 17-21, 21-16, 15-9 (1:00)
Match 13: Jake Gibb / Sean Rosenthal (3) def. Austin Rester / Aaron Wachtfogel (14) 21-17, 18-21, 15-11 (1:17)
Match 14: Ryan Mariano / Larry Witt (11) def. Casey Jennings / Mark Williams (6) 21-16, 21-19 (0:47)
Match 15: Anthony Medel / Fred Souza (7) def. Karch Kiraly / Kevin Wong (10) 23-21, 21-18 (0:53)
Match 16: Phil Dalhausser / Todd Rogers (2) def. Brad Keenan / John Mayer (18) 23-21, 21-19 (0:54)

Round 3
Match 17: Albert Hannemann / Ed Ratledge (17) def. Matt Olson / Jason Ring (9) 21-14, 17-21, 15-11 (1:04)
Match 18: Matt Fuerbringer / Sean Scott (4) def. Hans Stolfus / Scott Wong (12) 24-22, 21-17 (0:59)
Match 19: Jake Gibb / Sean Rosenthal (3) def. Ryan Mariano / Larry Witt (11) 21-18, 23-21 (0:54)
Match 20: Phil Dalhausser / Todd Rogers (2) def. Anthony Medel / Fred Souza (7) 22-20, 21-15 (0:52)

Round 4
Match 57: Jon Mesko / Eyal Zimet (23, Q8) def. Joaquin Acosta / Gaston Macau (Q17) 21-14, 21-12 (0:41)
Match 58: Skyler Davis / Derek Zimmerman (24, Q28) def. Seth Burnham / Tony Pray (Q13) 21-17, 21-19 (0:46)
Match 59: David Fischer / Scott Hill (22, Q3) def. Russ Marchewka / Fernando Sabla (Q11) 19-21, 21-16, 15-12 (1:02)
Match 60: Mike Morrison / Ty Tramblie (21, Q2) def. Leonardo Moraes / Jim Nichols (Q7) 21-19, 21-18 (0:47)


Winner's Bracket
Round 1
Match 1: Albert Hannemann / Ed Ratledge (17) def. Dain Blanton / Canyon Ceman (16) 21-16, 21-18 (0:50)      
Match 2: Matt Olson / Jason Ring (9) def. Skyler Davis / Derek Zimmerman (24, Q28) 21-17, 21-16 (0:42)      
Match 3: Hans Stolfus / Scott Wong (12) def. Mike Morrison / Ty Tramblie (21, Q2) 21-11, 21-11 (0:43)      
Match 4: Nick Lucena / Will Strickland (13) def. Adam Jewell / Jose Loiola (20) 16-21, 21-11, 15-13 (1:02)      
Match 5: Austin Rester / Aaron Wachtfogel (14) def. Jason Lee / Chad Turner (19) 21-19, 17-21, 15-12 (1:05)      
Match 6: Ryan Mariano / Larry Witt (11) def. David Fischer / Scott Hill (22, Q3) 21-14, 21-12 (0:44)      
Match 7: Karch Kiraly / Kevin Wong (10) def. Jon Mesko / Eyal Zimet (23, Q8) 21-15, 21-11 (0:40)      
Match 8: Brad Keenan / John Mayer (18) def. Brent Doble / Ty Loomis (15) 17-21, 26-24, 20-18 (1:24)      

Round 2
Match 9: Albert Hannemann / Ed Ratledge (17) def. Mike Lambert / Stein Metzger (1) 15-21, 21-19, 15-12 (1:07)      
Match 10: Matt Olson / Jason Ring (9) def. John Hyden / George Roumain (8) 21-16, 21-16 (0:50)      
Match 11: Hans Stolfus / Scott Wong (12) def. Dax Holdren / Jeff Nygaard (5) 22-20, 24-26, 15-12 (1:27)      
Match 12: Matt Fuerbringer / Sean Scott (4) def. Nick Lucena / Will Strickland (13) 17-21, 21-16, 15-9 (1:00)      
Match 13: Jake Gibb / Sean Rosenthal (3) def. Austin Rester / Aaron Wachtfogel (14) 21-17, 18-21, 15-11 (1:17)      
Match 14: Ryan Mariano / Larry Witt (11) def. Casey Jennings / Mark Williams (6) 21-16, 21-19 (0:47)      
Match 15: Anthony Medel / Fred Souza (7) def. Karch Kiraly / Kevin Wong (10) 23-21, 21-18 (0:53)      
Match 16: Phil Dalhausser / Todd Rogers (2) def. Brad Keenan / John Mayer (18) 23-21, 21-19 (0:54)      

Round 3
Match 17: Albert Hannemann / Ed Ratledge (17) def. Matt Olson / Jason Ring (9) 21-14, 17-21, 15-11 (1:04)      
Match 18: Matt Fuerbringer / Sean Scott (4) def. Hans Stolfus / Scott Wong (12) 24-22, 21-17 (0:59)      
Match 19: Jake Gibb / Sean Rosenthal (3) def. Ryan Mariano / Larry Witt (11) 21-18, 23-21 (0:54)      
Match 20: Phil Dalhausser / Todd Rogers (2) def. Anthony Medel / Fred Souza (7) 22-20, 21-15 (0:52)      

Round 4
Match 21: Matt Fuerbringer / Sean Scott (4) def. Albert Hannemann / Ed Ratledge (17) 19-21, 21-19, 17-15 (1:19)      
Match 22: Phil Dalhausser / Todd Rogers (2) def. Jake Gibb / Sean Rosenthal (3) 24-26, 21-12, 15-13 (1:18)      

Contender's Bracket
Round 1
Match 23: Dain Blanton / Canyon Ceman (16) def. Brad Keenan / John Mayer (18) 20-22, 21-15, 19-17 (1:01)      
Match 24: Karch Kiraly / Kevin Wong (10) def. Skyler Davis / Derek Zimmerman (24, Q28) 21-18, 21-13 (0:43)      
Match 25: Casey Jennings / Mark Williams (6) def. Mike Morrison / Ty Tramblie (21, Q2) 20-22, 21-14, 15-7 (0:59)      
Match 26: Adam Jewell / Jose Loiola (20) def. Austin Rester / Aaron Wachtfogel (14) 21-12, 18-21, 15-7 (0:55)      
Match 27: Nick Lucena / Will Strickland (13) def. Jason Lee / Chad Turner (19) 21-19, 21-19 (0:43)      
Match 28: Dax Holdren / Jeff Nygaard (5) def. David Fischer / Scott Hill (22, Q3) 18-21, 21-13, 15-10 (0:53)      
Match 29: John Hyden / George Roumain (8) def. Jon Mesko / Eyal Zimet (23, Q8) 21-16, 21-16 (0:53)      
Match 30: Brent Doble / Ty Loomis (15) def. Mike Lambert / Stein Metzger (1) 21-10, 21-18 (0:45)      

Round 2
Match 31: Karch Kiraly / Kevin Wong (10) def. Dain Blanton / Canyon Ceman (16) 21-16, 21-11 (0:49)      
Match 32: Casey Jennings / Mark Williams (6) def. Adam Jewell / Jose Loiola (20) 21-13, 21-17 (0:37)      
Match 33: Nick Lucena / Will Strickland (13) def. Dax Holdren / Jeff Nygaard (5) 21-18, 3-2 retired (0:32)      
Match 34: Brent Doble / Ty Loomis (15) def. John Hyden / George Roumain (8) 14-21, 21-19, 15-12 (1:16)      

Round 3
Match 35: Hans Stolfus / Scott Wong (12) def. Karch Kiraly / Kevin Wong (10) 18-21, 21-19, 16-14 (1:18)      
Match 36: Casey Jennings / Mark Williams (6) def. Matt Olson / Jason Ring (9) 23-21, 21-18 (0:48)      
Match 37: Nick Lucena / Will Strickland (13) def. Anthony Medel / Fred Souza (7) 21-15, 21-17 (0:39)      
Match 38: Ryan Mariano / Larry Witt (11) def. Brent Doble / Ty Loomis (15) 25-23, 24-22 (1:02)      

Round 4
Match 39: Casey Jennings / Mark Williams (6) def. Hans Stolfus / Scott Wong (12) 21-14, 21-16 (0:51)      
Match 40: Ryan Mariano / Larry Witt (11) def. Nick Lucena / Will Strickland (13) 17-21, 21-19, 18-16 (1:09)      

Round 5
Match 41: Jake Gibb / Sean Rosenthal (3) def. Casey Jennings / Mark Williams (6) 15-21, 21-10, 16-14 (1:02)      
Match 42: Ryan Mariano / Larry Witt (11) def. Albert Hannemann / Ed Ratledge (17) 21-12, 21-14 (0:40)      

Semifinals
Match 43: Jake Gibb / Sean Rosenthal (3) def. Matt Fuerbringer / Sean Scott (4) 14-21, 23-21, 15-12 (1:16)      
Match 44: Phil Dalhausser / Todd Rogers (2) def. Ryan Mariano / Larry Witt (11) 26-28, 21-18, 15-12 (1:14)      

Finals
Match 45: Phil Dalhausser / Todd Rogers (2) def. Jake Gibb / Sean Rosenthal (3) 21-14, 21-16 (0:55)      

Men's Results:

Men's $100,000 AVP Cuervo Gold Crown Dallas Open
April 19-22, 2007 
Finish Player Partner Seed Winnings Points  
1 Phil Dalhausser Todd Rogers 2 $20,000.00 360.0  
2 Jake Gibb Sean Rosenthal 3 $15,000.00 324.0  
3 Matt Fuerbringer Sean Scott 4 $9,500.00 270.0  
3 Ryan Mariano Larry Witt 11 $9,500.00 270.0  
5 Casey Jennings Mark Williams 6 $6,000.00 216.0  
5 Albert Hannemann Ed Ratledge 17 $6,000.00 216.0  
7 Hans Stolfus Scott Wong 12 $4,650.00 180.0  
7 Nick Lucena Will Strickland 13 $4,650.00 180.0  
9 Anthony Medel Fred Souza 7 $2,875.00 144.0  
9 Matt Olson Jason Ring 9 $2,875.00 144.0  
9 Karch Kiraly Kevin Wong 10 $2,875.00 144.0  
9 Brent Doble Ty Loomis 15 $2,875.00 144.0  
13 Dax Holdren Jeff Nygaard 5 $1,700.00 108.0  
13 John Hyden George Roumain 8 $1,700.00 108.0  
13 Dain Blanton Canyon Ceman 16 $1,700.00 108.0  
13 Adam Jewell Jose Loiola 20 $1,700.00 108.0  
17 Mike Lambert Stein Metzger 1 $800.00 72.0  
17 Austin Rester Aaron Wachtfogel 14 $800.00 72.0  
17 Brad Keenan John Mayer 18 $800.00 72.0  
17 Jason Lee Chad Turner 19 $800.00 72.0  
17 Mike Morrison Ty Tramblie 21, Q2 $800.00 72.0  
17 David Fischer Scott Hill 22, Q3 $800.00 72.0  
17 Jon Mesko Eyal Zimet 23, Q8 $800.00 72.0  
17 Skyler Davis Derek Zimmerman 24, Q28 $800.00 72.0  
25 Leonardo Moraes Jim Nichols Q7 $.00 36.0  
25 Russ Marchewka Fernando Sabla Q11 $.00 36.0  
25 Seth Burnham Tony Pray Q13 $.00 36.0  
25 Joaquin Acosta Gaston Macau Q17 $.00 36.0  
29 Jeff Carlucci Adam Roberts Q1 $.00 18.0  
29 Billy Allen AJ Mihalic Q4 $.00 18.0  
29 Vincent Robbins Jason Wight Q6 $.00 18.0  
29 Erik Gomez Lucas Wisniakowski Q12 $.00 18.0  
29 Rico Becker Mike Bruning Q14 $.00 18.0  
29 Everett Matthews Ivan Mercer Q18 $.00 18.0  
29 Matt McKinney Jeff Murrell Q23 $.00 18.0  
29 Esteban Escobar Jeff Smith Q24 $.00 18.0  
37 Dane Jensen Mike Placek Q5 $.00 12.0  
37 Chris Harger Jesse Webster Q9 $.00 12.0  
37 Chad Mowrey Kimo Tuyay Q10 $.00 12.0  
37 Matt Ogin Todd Strassberger Q15 $.00 12.0  
37 Pete DiVenere Justin Phipps Q16 $.00 12.0  
37 Guy Hamilton Andrew Vazquez Q19 $.00 12.0  
37 Yariv Lerner Rob McNaughton Q20 $.00 12.0  
37 Brandon Lamb Vince Zanzucchi Q21 $.00 12.0  
37 Shane Nelson Brian Post Q22 $.00 12.0  
37 Nate Hagstrom Tim May Q25 $.00 12.0  
37 Mike Desjardins Paul McDonald Q26 $.00 12.0  
37 Drew Hamilton Travis Regner Q27 $.00 12.0  
37 Bivin Sadler Andy Shean Q29 $.00 12.0  
37 LV Hanson Lance Kobza Q31 $.00 12.0  
37 Will Johnson Kyle Patton Q33 $.00 12.0  
37 Greg Arentz Jaime Calata Q35 $.00 12.0  
53 Chad Borton Richard Rainwater Q30 $.00 8.0  
53 Richard Crouse Dan Stubinski Q32 $.00 8.0  
53 Steven Buesing Steve Ramey Q34 $.00 8.0  
53 Tom Chapman Kyle Kennedy Q36 $.00 8.0  
53 Tom Lovelace Randy Meador Q37 $.00 8.0  
53 Derek Bond Steve Sheppard Q38 $.00 8.0  
53 Daniel Lindsey Dewain Martin Q39 $.00 8.0  
53 Jay Novacek Curtis Pitts Q40 $.00 8.0  
53 Caine Cambron Thomas Oley Q41 $.00 8.0  
53 Carlos Andrade Jerry McCoy Q42 $.00 8.0  
 
 

2007 Men's Quervo Gold Crown Dallas Open Champions >>Phil Dalhausser/Todd Rogers
 


  .                                             Phil Dalhausser                                                                                                            Todd Rogers


Women's Entries:

Women's $100,000 AVP Cuervo Gold Crown Dallas Open
April 19-22, 2007 
Finish Player Partner Seed  
1 Misty May-Treanor Kerri Walsh 1 $20,000.00 360.0  
2 Nicole Branagh Elaine Youngs 2 $15,000.00 324.0  
3 Dianne DeNecochea Barbra Fontana 4 $9,500.00 270.0  
3 Tyra Turner Rachel Wacholder 5 $9,500.00 270.0  
5 Carrie Dodd Tatiana Minello 7 $6,000.00 216.0  
5 Angela Lewis Priscilla Lima 14 $6,000.00 216.0  
7 Holly McPeak Logan Tom 6 $4,650.00 180.0  
7 Jennifer Boss April Ross 8 $4,650.00 180.0  
9 Annett Davis Jenny Johnson Jordan 3 $2,875.00 144.0  
9 Heidi Ilustre Diane Pascua 13 $2,875.00 144.0  
9 Lauren Fendrick Brittany Hochevar 15 $2,875.00 144.0  
9 Alicia Polzin Paula Roca 16 $2,875.00 144.0  
13 Jenny Pavley Sarah Straton 9 $1,700.00 108.0  
13 Jennifer Fopma Stacy Rouwenhorst 10 $1,700.00 108.0  
13 Michelle More Suzanne Stonebarger 11 $1,700.00 108.0  
13 Ashley Ivy Heather Lowe 21 $1,700.00 108.0  
17 Angie Akers Brooke Hanson 12 $800.00 72.0  
17 Katie Lindquist Tracy Lindquist 17 $800.00 72.0  
17 Jill Changaris Sara Dukes 18, Q4 $800.00 72.0  
17 Janelle Ruen Jennifer Snyder 19 $800.00 72.0  
17 Keao Burdine Jaimie Lee 20 $800.00 72.0  
17 Claire Robertson Julie Romias 22, Q1 $800.00 72.0  
17 Nicki Fusco Gina Kirstein 23, Q14 $800.00 72.0  
17 Angie Hall Laura Ratto 24, Q10 $800.00 72.0  
25 Tara Kuk Kim Whitney Q2 $.00 36.0  
25 Angela McHenry Lisa Rutledge Q5 $.00 36.0  
25 Krystal Jackson Tiffany Rodriguez Q6 $.00 36.0  
25 Dana Schilling Alicia Zamparelli Q8 $.00 36.0  
29 Jenelle Koester Catie Mintz Q3 $.00 18.0  
29 Lisa Marshall Marla O'Hara Q7 $.00 18.0  
29 Stephanie Chapek Chrissie Zartman Q9 $.00 18.0  
29 Iwona Lodzik Kristin Ursillo Q11 $.00 18.0  
29 Bonnie Levin Alexandra Sevillano Q12 $.00 18.0  
29 Leilani Kamahoahoa Federica Tonon Q13 $.00 18.0  
29 Gabriela Roney Lenka Urbanova Q15 $.00 18.0  
29 Jennifer Lombardi Laurel Riechmann Q17 $.00 18.0  
37 Nicole Midwin Colleen Smith Q16 $.00 12.0  
37 Wendy Lockhart Teri Van Dyke Q18 $.00 12.0  
37 Jane Gibb Kirstin Olsen Q19 $.00 12.0  
37 Chara Harris Brooke Langston Q20 $.00 12.0  
37 Heather Alley Heidi Munneke Q21 $.00 12.0  
37 Whitney Pavlik Kelly Wing Q22 $.00 12.0  
37 Kyra Lancon Ashley Regner Q23 $.00 12.0  
37 Erika Figueiredo Rebekah Johnson Q24 $.00 12.0  
37 Victoria Prince Jessica Veris Q25 $.00 12.0  
37 Mia Chamblee Montana Curtis Q26 $.00 12.0  
37 Laura Jones Amber Spencer Q27 $.00 12.0  
37 Regan Hood Daniela Romero Q28 $.00 12.0  
37 Yolanda Munoz Joanna Rathbun Q29 $.00 12.0  
37 Marci Brinkman Rebecca Duty Q30 $.00 12.0  
37 Leslie Lasiter Gena Rhodes Q31 $.00 12.0  
 
Women's $100,000 AVP Cuervo Gold Crown Dallas Open

April 19-22, 2007 

Qualifier Bracket
Round 1
Match 2: Jennifer Lombardi / Laurel Riechmann (Q17) def. Nicole Midwin / Colleen Smith (Q16) 21-13, 21-9 (0:33)
Match 3: Stephanie Chapek / Chrissie Zartman (Q9) def. Erika Figueiredo / Rebekah Johnson (Q24) 21-12, 21-13 (0:32)
Match 4: Dana Schilling / Alicia Zamparelli (Q8) def. Victoria Prince / Jessica Veris (Q25) 21-15, 21-11 (0:35)
Match 5: Angela McHenry / Lisa Rutledge (Q5) def. Regan Hood / Daniela Romero (Q28) 21-18, 21-14 (0:35)
Match 6: Bonnie Levin / Alexandra Sevillano (Q12) def. Heather Alley / Heidi Munneke (Q21) 12-21, 21-11, 15-7 (0:49)
Match 7: Leilani Kamahoahoa / Federica Tonon (Q13) def. Chara Harris / Brooke Langston (Q20) 21-11, 19-21, 18-16 (0:59)
Match 8: Jill Changaris / Sara Dukes (Q4) def. Yolanda Munoz / Joanna Rathbun (Q29) 21-7, 21-14 (0:34)
Match 9: Jenelle Koester / Catie Mintz (Q3) def. Marci Brinkman / Rebecca Duty (Q30) 21-8, 21-12 (0:29)
Match 10: Nicki Fusco / Gina Kirstein (Q14) def. Jane Gibb / Kirstin Olsen (Q19) 21-11, 21-15 (0:36)
Match 11: Iwona Lodzik / Kristin Ursillo (Q11) def. Whitney Pavlik / Kelly Wing (Q22) 21-12, 21-17 (0:38)
Match 12: Krystal Jackson / Tiffany Rodriguez (Q6) def. Laura Jones / Amber Spencer (Q27) 21-17, 21-17 (0:39)
Match 13: Lisa Marshall / Marla O'Hara (Q7) def. Mia Chamblee / Montana Curtis (Q26) 21-16, 17-21, 15-11 (0:58)
Match 14: Angie Hall / Laura Ratto (Q10) def. Kyra Lancon / Ashley Regner (Q23) 21-18, 13-21, 15-12 (0:57)
Match 15: Gabriela Roney / Lenka Urbanova (Q15) def. Wendy Lockhart / Teri Van Dyke (Q18) 19-21, 21-19, 15-13 (1:00)
Match 16: Tara Kuk / Kim Whitney (Q2) def. Leslie Lasiter / Gena Rhodes (Q31) 21-11, 21-7 (0:39)

Round 2
Match 17: Claire Robertson / Julie Romias (Q1) def. Jennifer Lombardi / Laurel Riechmann (Q17) 21-11, 21-14 (0:34)
Match 18: Dana Schilling / Alicia Zamparelli (Q8) def. Stephanie Chapek / Chrissie Zartman (Q9) 22-20, 22-20 (0:37)
Match 19: Angela McHenry / Lisa Rutledge (Q5) def. Bonnie Levin / Alexandra Sevillano (Q12) 21-11, 18-21, 15-11 (0:49)
Match 20: Jill Changaris / Sara Dukes (Q4) def. Leilani Kamahoahoa / Federica Tonon (Q13) 21-7, 21-15 (0:37)
Match 21: Nicki Fusco / Gina Kirstein (Q14) def. Jenelle Koester / Catie Mintz (Q3) 22-20, 15-21, 15-10 (1:01)
Match 22: Krystal Jackson / Tiffany Rodriguez (Q6) def. Iwona Lodzik / Kristin Ursillo (Q11) 21-10, 21-10 (0:32)
Match 23: Angie Hall / Laura Ratto (Q10) def. Lisa Marshall / Marla O'Hara (Q7) 21-18, 21-17 (0:41)
Match 24: Tara Kuk / Kim Whitney (Q2) def. Gabriela Roney / Lenka Urbanova (Q15) 21-9, 21-14 (0:30)

Round 3
Match 25: Claire Robertson / Julie Romias (22, Q1) def. Dana Schilling / Alicia Zamparelli (Q8) 21-15, 21-18 (0:43)
Match 26: Jill Changaris / Sara Dukes (18, Q4) def. Angela McHenry / Lisa Rutledge (Q5) 21-16, 21-16 (0:41)
Match 27: Nicki Fusco / Gina Kirstein (23, Q14) def. Krystal Jackson / Tiffany Rodriguez (Q6) 15-21, 21-18, 15-12 (0:55)
Match 28: Angie Hall / Laura Ratto (24, Q10) def. Tara Kuk / Kim Whitney (Q2) 12-21, 21-18, 15-13 (0:54)

Winner's Bracket
Round 1
Match 1: Alicia Polzin / Paula Roca (16) def. Katie Lindquist / Tracy Lindquist (17) 21-18, 21-18 (0:49)
Match 2: Jenny Pavley / Sarah Straton (9) def. Angie Hall / Laura Ratto (24, Q10) 21-10, 22-20 (0:36)
Match 3: Ashley Ivy / Heather Lowe (21) def. Angie Akers / Brooke Hanson (12) 20-22, 22-20, 21-19 (1:10)
Match 4: Heidi Ilustre / Diane Pascua (13) def. Keao Burdine / Jaimie Lee (20) 21-9, 25-23 (0:35)
Match 5: Angela Lewis / Priscilla Lima (14) def. Janelle Ruen / Jennifer Snyder (19) 21-18, 21-19 (0:42)
Match 6: Michelle More / Suzanne Stonebarger (11) def. Claire Robertson / Julie Romias (22, Q1) 21-17, 21-23, 17-15 (1:10)
Match 7: Jennifer Fopma / Stacy Rouwenhorst (10) def. Nicki Fusco / Gina Kirstein (23, Q14) 21-13, 21-18 (0:36)
Match 8: Lauren Fendrick / Brittany Hochevar (15) def. Jill Changaris / Sara Dukes (18, Q4) 21-16, 21-14 (0:41)

Round 2
Match 9: Misty May-Treanor / Kerri Walsh (1) def. Alicia Polzin / Paula Roca (16) 21-12, 21-11 (0:32)
Match 10: Jennifer Boss / April Ross (8) def. Jenny Pavley / Sarah Straton (9) 26-24, 21-19 (0:45)
Match 11: Tyra Turner / Rachel Wacholder (5) def. Ashley Ivy / Heather Lowe (21) 21-18, 21-18 (0:43)
Match 12: Dianne DeNecochea / Barbra Fontana (4) def. Heidi Ilustre / Diane Pascua (13) 21-10, 21-18 (0:39)
Match 13: Angela Lewis / Priscilla Lima (14) def. Annett Davis / Jenny Johnson Jordan (3) 21-18, 17-21, 15-10 (0:55)
Match 14: Holly McPeak / Logan Tom (6) def. Michelle More / Suzanne Stonebarger (11) 21-18, 21-19 (0:49)
Match 15: Carrie Dodd / Tatiana Minello (7) def. Jennifer Fopma / Stacy Rouwenhorst (10) 21-12, 19-21, 15-6 (0:51)
Match 16: Nicole Branagh / Elaine Youngs (2) def. Lauren Fendrick / Brittany Hochevar (15) 21-18, 21-14 (0:49)

Round 3
Match 17: Misty May-Treanor / Kerri Walsh (1) def. Jennifer Boss / April Ross (8) 21-18, 21-16 (0:44)
Match 18: Dianne DeNecochea / Barbra Fontana (4) def. Tyra Turner / Rachel Wacholder (5) 21-17, 21-19 (0:52)
Match 19: Angela Lewis / Priscilla Lima (14) def. Holly McPeak / Logan Tom (6) 21-18, 21-19 (0:40)
Match 20: Nicole Branagh / Elaine Youngs (2) def. Carrie Dodd / Tatiana Minello (7) 21-17, 21-13 (0:36)

Round 4
Match 21: Misty May-Treanor / Kerri Walsh (1) def. Dianne DeNecochea / Barbra Fontana (4) 21-16, 21-18 (0:47)
Match 22: Nicole Branagh / Elaine Youngs (2) def. Angela Lewis / Priscilla Lima (14) 21-13, 19-21, 15-12 (1:02)

Contender's Bracket
Round 1
Match 23: Lauren Fendrick / Brittany Hochevar (15) def. Katie Lindquist / Tracy Lindquist (17) 21-17, 21-19 (0:37)
Match 24: Jennifer Fopma / Stacy Rouwenhorst (10) def. Angie Hall / Laura Ratto (24, Q10) 21-16, 21-15 (0:37)
Match 25: Michelle More / Suzanne Stonebarger (11) def. Angie Akers / Brooke Hanson (12) 23-21, 23-21 (0:53)
Match 26: Annett Davis / Jenny Johnson Jordan (3) def. Keao Burdine / Jaimie Lee (20) 34-32, 21-12 (1:00)
Match 27: Heidi Ilustre / Diane Pascua (13) def. Janelle Ruen / Jennifer Snyder (19) 21-11, 21-18 (0:34)
Match 28: Ashley Ivy / Heather Lowe (21) def. Claire Robertson / Julie Romias (22, Q1) 21-18, 16-21, 18-16 (1:00)
Match 29: Jenny Pavley / Sarah Straton (9) def. Nicki Fusco / Gina Kirstein (23, Q14) 21-19, 21-14 (0:39)
Match 30: Alicia Polzin / Paula Roca (16) def. Jill Changaris / Sara Dukes (18, Q4) 21-13, 21-15 (0:40)

Round 2
Match 31: Lauren Fendrick / Brittany Hochevar (15) def. Jennifer Fopma / Stacy Rouwenhorst (10) 15-21, 21-16, 15-8 (0:46)
Match 32: Annett Davis / Jenny Johnson Jordan (3) def. Michelle More / Suzanne Stonebarger (11) 21-19, 21-16 (0:47)
Match 33: Heidi Ilustre / Diane Pascua (13) def. Ashley Ivy / Heather Lowe (21) 17-21, 21-17, 15-11 (1:00)
Match 34: Alicia Polzin / Paula Roca (16) def. Jenny Pavley / Sarah Straton (9) 21-16, 21-19 (0:43)

Round 3
Match 35: Tyra Turner / Rachel Wacholder (5) def. Lauren Fendrick / Brittany Hochevar (15) 17-21, 21-16, 15-13 (0:57)
Match 36: Jennifer Boss / April Ross (8) def. Annett Davis / Jenny Johnson Jordan (3) 14-21, 24-22, 15-10 (1:10)
Match 37: Carrie Dodd / Tatiana Minello (7) def. Heidi Ilustre / Diane Pascua (13) 21-17, 21-14 (0:39)
Match 38: Holly McPeak / Logan Tom (6) def. Alicia Polzin / Paula Roca (16) 20-22, 21-13, 15-12 (0:56)

Round 4
Match 39: Tyra Turner / Rachel Wacholder (5) def. Jennifer Boss / April Ross (8) 21-18, 21-19 (0:43)
Match 40: Carrie Dodd / Tatiana Minello (7) def. Holly McPeak / Logan Tom (6) 21-8, 21-14 (0:34)

Round 5
Match 41: Tyra Turner / Rachel Wacholder (5) def. Angela Lewis / Priscilla Lima (14) 21-18, 19-21, 15-13 (1:00)
Match 42: Dianne DeNecochea / Barbra Fontana (4) def. Carrie Dodd / Tatiana Minello (7) 23-21, 14-21, 15-8 (0:57)

Semifinals
Match 43: Misty May-Treanor / Kerri Walsh (1) def. Tyra Turner / Rachel Wacholder (5) 21-16, 23-21 (0:41)
Match 44: Nicole Branagh / Elaine Youngs (2) def. Dianne DeNecochea / Barbra Fontana (4) 21-17, 21-18 (0:48)

Finals
Match 45: Misty May-Treanor / Kerri Walsh (1) def. Nicole Branagh / Elaine Youngs (2) 21-14, 21-19 (0:55) 


Women's Results:

Women's $100,000 AVP Cuervo Gold Crown Dallas Open
April 19-22, 2007 
Finish Player Partner Seed Winnings Points  
1 Misty May-Treanor Kerri Walsh 1 $20,000.00 360.0  
2 Nicole Branagh Elaine Youngs 2 $15,000.00 324.0  
3 Dianne DeNecochea Barbra Fontana 4 $9,500.00 270.0  
3 Tyra Turner Rachel Wacholder 5 $9,500.00 270.0  
5 Carrie Dodd Tatiana Minello 7 $6,000.00 216.0  
5 Angela Lewis Priscilla Lima 14 $6,000.00 216.0  
7 Holly McPeak Logan Tom 6 $4,650.00 180.0  
7 Jennifer Boss April Ross 8 $4,650.00 180.0  
9 Annett Davis Jenny Johnson Jordan 3 $2,875.00 144.0  
9 Heidi Ilustre Diane Pascua 13 $2,875.00 144.0  
9 Lauren Fendrick Brittany Hochevar 15 $2,875.00 144.0  
9 Alicia Polzin Paula Roca 16 $2,875.00 144.0  
13 Jenny Pavley Sarah Straton 9 $1,700.00 108.0  
13 Jennifer Fopma Stacy Rouwenhorst 10 $1,700.00 108.0  
13 Michelle More Suzanne Stonebarger 11 $1,700.00 108.0  
13 Ashley Ivy Heather Lowe 21 $1,700.00 108.0  
17 Angie Akers Brooke Hanson 12 $800.00 72.0  
17 Katie Lindquist Tracy Lindquist 17 $800.00 72.0  
17 Jill Changaris Sara Dukes 18, Q4 $800.00 72.0  
17 Janelle Ruen Jennifer Snyder 19 $800.00 72.0  
17 Keao Burdine Jaimie Lee 20 $800.00 72.0  
17 Claire Robertson Julie Romias 22, Q1 $800.00 72.0  
17 Nicki Fusco Gina Kirstein 23, Q14 $800.00 72.0  
17 Angie Hall Laura Ratto 24, Q10 $800.00 72.0  
25 Tara Kuk Kim Whitney Q2 $.00 36.0  
25 Angela McHenry Lisa Rutledge Q5 $.00 36.0  
25 Krystal Jackson Tiffany Rodriguez Q6 $.00 36.0  
25 Dana Schilling Alicia Zamparelli Q8 $.00 36.0  
29 Jenelle Koester Catie Mintz Q3 $.00 18.0  
29 Lisa Marshall Marla O'Hara Q7 $.00 18.0  
29 Stephanie Chapek Chrissie Zartman Q9 $.00 18.0  
29 Iwona Lodzik Kristin Ursillo Q11 $.00 18.0  
29 Bonnie Levin Alexandra Sevillano Q12 $.00 18.0  
29 Leilani Kamahoahoa Federica Tonon Q13 $.00 18.0  
29 Gabriela Roney Lenka Urbanova Q15 $.00 18.0  
29 Jennifer Lombardi Laurel Riechmann Q17 $.00 18.0  
37 Nicole Midwin Colleen Smith Q16 $.00 12.0  
37 Wendy Lockhart Teri Van Dyke Q18 $.00 12.0  
37 Jane Gibb Kirstin Olsen Q19 $.00 12.0  
37 Chara Harris Brooke Langston Q20 $.00 12.0  
37 Heather Alley Heidi Munneke Q21 $.00 12.0  
37 Whitney Pavlik Kelly Wing Q22 $.00 12.0  
37 Kyra Lancon Ashley Regner Q23 $.00 12.0  
37 Erika Figueiredo Rebekah Johnson Q24 $.00 12.0  
37 Victoria Prince Jessica Veris Q25 $.00 12.0  
37 Mia Chamblee Montana Curtis Q26 $.00 12.0  
37 Laura Jones Amber Spencer Q27 $.00 12.0  
37 Regan Hood Daniela Romero Q28 $.00 12.0  
37 Yolanda Munoz Joanna Rathbun Q29 $.00 12.0  
37 Marci Brinkman Rebecca Duty Q30 $.00 12.0  
37 Leslie Lasiter Gena Rhodes Q31 $.00 12.0  

2007 Women's Quervo Gold Crown Dallas Open Champions >>Misty May-Treanor/Kerri Walsh
       
      Misty May-Treanor                                     Kerri Walsh

Articles 2007:

May-Treanor, Walsh look for revenge
Kiraly makes final competitive trip to Texas
By Colleen Murray / AVP.com
As hard as it may be to believe, the last time an AVP event was in Dallas, Misty May-Treanor and Kerri Walsh were just gleams in the AVP's eye. Plenty has changed since 1998, and May-Treanor and Walsh have now firmly established themselves as the top team on tour.
May-Treanor and Walsh now have a score to settle as they head to Texas. The two fell to eventual champions Elaine Youngs and Nicole Branagh in the Miami Open semifinal Sunday. This loss marked the first time since 2004 that the Olympians didn't make it to the last game.
May-Treanor and Walsh are notorious for playing with a vengeance after not making -- or losing -- a final game. Women's teams should be on the lookout for May-Treanor and Walsh to come back swinging.
Another source of competition that will garner attention is the combination of April Ross and Jennifer Boss. Ross and Boss are a makeshift partnership of sorts. Ross's original partner, Nancy Mason, suffered an injury, and Boss's original partner, Keao Burdine, is finishing out her season in Puerto Rico. If Burdine and Mason do return, will Boss and Ross go back to their original game plans, even after their successful performance together?
The top three teams on tour -- Stein Metzger/Mike Lambert, Todd Rogers/Phil Dalhausser and Jake Gibb/Sean Rosenthal -- proved why belonged at the top and why they, unlike the majority of the teams on tour, chose to keep their teams intact.
All four top-seeded teams made semifinals for only the 11th time since 2001, with Dalhausser and Rogers eventually taking the title. Look for Rogers to try and use his experience to make him the wiser in Dallas. When the event last came around in 1998, Rogers lost in the finals.
On the men's side, expect the new teams to try to make up for their lack of familiarity with their partners on the court as soon as possible to end the domination of returning partnerships.
Karch Kiraly will be a face to watch in Dallas. He and partner Kevin Wong recorded a 5th place finish in Miami, the first open of his last season playing on the AVP tour.
Kiraly scored back-to-back wins in Dallas and hopes to add another in his last competitive trip to the Texas city.

The AVP Crocs Tour to stop in Arlington
04/16/2007 4:34 PM ET
Temporary beach will be set up adjacent to stadium
By Mike Scarr / MLB.com 
From strikeout to side-out, two sports will share the spotlight at the Rangers Ballpark in Arlington this weekend.
The AVP Crocs Tour will travel to Arlington to play the Cuervo Gold Crown Dallas Open, which starts Thursday with qualifying rounds. A co-partnership between the Hicks Sports Marketing Group and AVP, the Dallas Open is designed to cross-promote two sports while also building a fan base.
"They're using their expertise and infrastructure to do something more than just baseball and hockey in a big way," said AVP general manager of events and partnerships, Gabby Roe. "We want to utilize what they bring to the table combined with the entity and property and the brand of AVP, and that is a pretty lethal combination."
It will basically be an inside/outside affair with the Rangers competing on the field as the A's visit for a three-game weekend series. Friday and Saturday will both be under the lights at 7:05 p.m. CT while Sunday's game will be at 2:05 p.m.
The tour will set up outside, occupying a space adjacent to the stadium that will be transformed into a temporary beach area -- 3,150,000 pounds of sand worth. Action will take place on seven courts during the four-day event with the main draw beginning Friday at 8:00 a.m. CT.
It is the combination of beach and baseball that intrigued the Hicks Group, owners of both the Rangers and the NHL Dallas Stars. In conjunction with Steiner and Associates, the Hicks Group is also moving forward with Glorypark, a mixed-use real estate development that will feature both residential and commercial properties in an area near the Ballpark that is currently used for parking.
"Part of our long-term vision is a number of events and the AVP fits into that plan," said Hicks Sports Marketing Group senior vice president Brad Alberts, who contacted the tour about a year ago to explore the idea. "(The AVP) is a cool, summertime type of event and one, among others, that we'd like to bring to the area."
The baseball part is easy; the Rangers have their field. But volleyball needs courts, specifically sand in the outdoor beach variety. While it's a natural occurrence at venues like Huntington Beach, Arlington is hundreds of miles from the Gulf.
Roe said transporting the sand, both in and then out of the venue, is always a unique process with cost only being part of the equation. He compared it to snow: No two flakes are identical. While the man-made courts are invariably shallower than the natural ones, setting up in an otherwise non-beach area has its advantages.
"Given the flow of traffic at sporting events it is somewhat easier at a venue like this than it is at real beaches or parks that aren't really made for spectator sporting events," Roe said. "With parking and infrastructure and things of that nature this is actually easier than Manhattan Beach or Hermosa Beach that aren't actually designed to have thousands upon thousands of people heading to one spot for over a weekend."
It's also about growth.
The Hicks Group is looking to draw people to its new development and add lifestyle to the area. The tour is trying to reach out to fans wherever it can. It's relatively easy to attract fans in Southern California, where the game is played on beaches up and down the coast. But the AVP is an 18-stop tour that will travel to cities like Atlanta, Ga., and Louisville, Ky., in addition to Arlington so taking the game to the fans is part of the mission.
"If we were restricted to only going to places where we have existing beaches we would be under-servicing our fan base," Roe said. "While the television broadcasts go everywhere across the country and around the world it is nice to allow our fans to see us in person without forcing to have to be on a beach to do it."
Neither Roe nor Alberts believes there will be any logistical conflicts as play outside the stadium should be completed at least an hour before first pitch of each Rangers game. What they do see is a partnership, one that could extend beyond the initial three-year contract.
"Hicks Sports Marketing Group is excited to bring beach volleyball back to the north Texas area," Alberts said. "We feel that it is real important longterm."
Mike Scarr is a senior reporter for AVP.com. This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.

Austin's city limits
Rester back in Dallas to impress the home folks
By Monique Moyal / AVP.com
Jumping into a car with only $800 to his name and preparing to head more than 1,000 miles west towards Manhattan Beach, Calif., 23-year old Austin Rester's journey as a professional beach volleyball player began in 2005. And he only started playing seriously five years prior to that.
Nearly two years later, the Grapevine, Texas, native is returning to his home state hoping to promote the sport in an area unfamiliar with beach volleyball.
"There's absolutely no men's volleyball anywhere in Texas," said Rester. "For the most part, Texas has very little volleyball notoriety except for their women's and girls' programs. It would be great if this event gave it some exposure, it'd be awesome."
Just because there are limited opportunities to play volleyball in Texas, do not assume that the stands will be empty this weekend.
Many locals will be in attendance to catch a glimpse of their hometown hero and to welcome the return of professional beach volleyball, as 2007 marks the first year that the AVP has returned to the Dallas area since 1998.
And for Rester's friends and family, the weekend will be their first chance to see him play in Texas since his career's taken off. Rester and partner Aaron Wachtfogel should be an exciting pair to watch in Dallas this weekend, as they are sure to have a significant following of local support cheering on every point.
Rester attributes much of his recent success to a balance of hard work and luck since he decided to make the switch from playing basketball to volleyball after he graduated from high school in 2000. Rester transferred and played at the University of Hawaii in the spring of 2004 -- until money became an issue.
"In 2003-2004, I played one season [at Hawaii] and decided money was an issue and I couldn't afford to play there anymore. So I actually decided to finish up with school, because I knew that I wanted to play beach," said Rester. "Indoor is a little hard on my body, more or less, and so I didn't need to be in Hawaii. I just took my time, finished my schooling and then went to L.A."
And on his personal deadline, Rester moved out west with hopes of turning his talents into a career.
"I graduated from Texas Tech in December of '05 with Journalism and Spanish (concentrations) and decided that when I graduated on March 14, no matter what happened, no matter what the situation, I was moving out to L.A. to pursue playing beach volleyball," said Rester.
Since then, he has overcome an ankle injury and having to constantly switch partners to earn a bid into the main draw in only one season.
During the 2005 tour, Rester cycled through five partners before finding a match in Wachtfogel this year -- a partner with whom he sees a successful future throughout 2007.
"It's just kind of the nature of the game, you get guys with more points and more experience, and if you have the opportunity you kind of just move on," said Rester. "But once you get with a guy that's got good experience, a great skill set and a lot of points and you guys gel together, then you kind of lock it in. And the chips fell as they did, Aaron and I ended up playing and training together and I definitely think that Aaron and I have a future of playing together for the whole season."
Even though Rester had to take a break from training in the offseason to undergo surgery on his ankle, he and Wachtfogel propelled past their No. 18 seed with a ninth-place finish in the 2007 Cuervo Gold Crown Miami Open last weekend.
Rester reveals his optimistic side and his hunger for the sport.
"You get to scout, watch tendencies and see things that you can find when you play, and when you're playing in the future, you learn from their tendencies and their habits," said Rester. "So it's good. I watch guys that block like Phil Dalhausser, Matt Fuerbringer, Sean Scott and those guys who are good technical blockers. But mostly I just pick it up with other people and learn as I go."
After his ninth-place finish in the first tournament of the season, tying his career best, it seems that Rester's $800 may be the beginnings of a very wise investment.

Take me out to the beach

Volleyball heads to the ballpark in Texas
By Mike Scarr / AVP.com
The AVP Crocs Tour visits Texas this week, and it promises to be no lone star appearance.
For starters, the 2007 Cuervo Gold Crown Dallas Open is the first of a three-year deal between the AVP and Hicks Sports Marketing Group. But also, at least on the women's side, there are indicators that this season may not merely be a rerun of the last.
The tour kicked off last weekend in Miami, and although the top team of Misty May-Treanor and Kerri Walsh appeared well on its way to opening the season as has become their custom -- with a title -- they stood on the sidelines as Elaine Youngs and Nicole Branagh uncorked the champagne.
Todd Rogers and Phil Dalhausser won the men's draw.
May-Treanor and Walsh didn't even reach the final, something they've experienced only twice in 46 matches as a pair. The last time was 2004 in Manhattan Beach, and Walsh laid the blame on herself.
"It came down to siding out and I didn't side out," Walsh said afterward. "If you're not siding out, you've got to score some points and earn them back. It's just one of those days. We're learning, and I'm learning."
The tournament is being held adjacent to Rangers Ballpark in Arlington with qualifying rounds contested Thursday leading into the weekend's main draw. Play will commence at 8 a.m. CT on Thursday and Friday, at 10:00 a.m. Saturday and 8:30 a.m. on Sunday.
Inside the stadium, there will be baseball as the Rangers will host the Oakland A's in a three-game series, beginning Friday at 7:05 p.m. CT. Saturday's game will also be at 7:05 while Sunday will be at 2:05 p.m. CT.
But outside it will be all about volleyball and with Youngs and Branagh facing the new duo of Jennifer Boss and April Ross in last week's women's final, some are seeing a possible trend developing for this season.
"I think any given weekend, it can be any team. It really can. It's a crap shoot," said Carrie Dodd, who played college ball and was All-America her senior year at Texas. "You always think Misty and Kerri in the finals, you know, great team. But EY and Nicole, they're a great serving team and they're a great blocking team which makes it difficult to side out.
"The women's side is getting so much stronger as the years go on. It really can be anybody's time to get to the finals and prove that they belong there and they can win. There are a lot of good, strong teams."
On the men's side, there was little surprise to the outcome in Miami as Rogers and Dalhausser claimed this season's first title. The pair won eight times on tour in 2006, and Rogers was named MVP, though many believe it could have gone to his partner.
Dalhausser wasn't happy with his play in their previous matches over the weekend. After spending time at a promotional event earlier in the week, Dalhausser said he came out flat and gave credit to his partner as they advanced out of the winner's bracket.
The man they call "The Thin Beast" was dominant in Sunday's final victory over Jake Gibb and Sean Rosenthal, which supported Rogers' preseason assessment of the 6-foot-9 man.
"As long as he stays healthy, he should be a multiple MVP," Rogers said.
Dalhausser and Rogers look to continue their streak but the teams of Mike Lambert and Stein Metzger, Casey Jennings and Mark Williams and Gibb and Rosenthal are ready to challenge.
Local color: Dodd hails from Wisconsin and lives in California but considers the state of Texas her second home.
She has a number of friends from her days with the Longhorns that were highlighted by a second-place NCAA finish in 1995. Playing in the Dallas area also allows Dodd to visit her sister Nikki, a member of Texas' championship team in 1988, and an 18-month-old nephew Austin.
Dodd got her first taste of beach volleyball as a ball girl at events in Bradford Beach in Wisconsin, and then, while playing at a local bar in Austin. She's pleased the tour is visiting the area for the first time since 1999.
"I love it. I'm extremely happy that the AVP is going back to Dallas. Believe it or not, there is volleyball in Texas," Dodd said. "I know that everybody thinks it's just in California but Texas has UT and there are young girls in club programs that are absolutely incredible."
Dodd and new partner Tatiana Minello finished ninth in Miami, but with just a week of practice under their belts entering last weekend, Dodd said they should only get better.
"We have some good ball control and good setting," Dodd said. "Tatia is incredibly quick on defense. It is just a matter of getting on the court more, how you mesh and how you move on the court. It takes time."
By the numbers: May-Treanor is three shy of Holly McPeak's record of 72 wins. … Karch Kiraly has won three times in Dallas with three different partners: Kent Steffes (1994) Scott Ayakatubby (1995) and Adam Johnson (1999). Kiraly finished fifth last week with new partner, Kevin Wong. … Rogers won the 1998 Dallas Open with Dax Holdren. … Dalhausser, Lambert and Wong lead the tour with 32 blocks. … Fred Souza has 14 aces while Kiraly has 94 digs. … Dianne DeNecochea and Youngs lead the women with 16 aces apiece. DeNecochea has 21 blocks.
Format: The Dallas Open will have a 32-team qualifier, both men's and women's, and a 24-team main draw on seven courts.
Set your clocks: The men's final will be Saturday, April 21, at 4:00 p.m. CT, and the women's final will be Sunday, April 22, at 12:15 p.m. CT.
Mike Scarr is a senior reporter for AVP.com.

Professional Beach Volleyball Player Hopes for Olympics
April 19th, 2007 @ 6:58am
Ashley Hayes Reporting
Click Here for video
We're used to seeing Utahns excel in winter sports like skiing and ice skating. But beach volleyball?
A man from Bountiful is chasing his Olympic dream by competing on the professional beach volleyball tour. He started playing when he joined an intramural team at the University of Utah.
Growing up as the youngest child in a family of 11 and living in landlocked Bountiful, Utah, it seems unlikely little Jake Gibb would find himself at the top of this beach game.
His sister, Laralai, said, "We thought he was a good golfer. We thought maybe golfing. And then summer he would do this volleyball stuff that nobody watches."
Maybe not in Utah. But people around the world are watching him now. And while no one predicted volleyball, everyone who knows Gibb will tell you he was going places.
His sister-in-law, Joy Givv, said, "I remember meeting him when he was 12, and he was a little full of himself."
Laralai described him as, "Just very fun. Very confident. We always thought he was too confident."
Gibb's non-defeatist attitude served him well.
"I guess I started when I wanted to play D-1 basketball, but I couldn't get on a team. So I started playing volleyball at that time, and I just grew passionate about it," he explained.
Gibb's love of volleyball set him up to find his other passion -- a fellow volleyball player, and now his wife and number one fan.
Joy Gibb said, "Without Jane there is no Jake, and that's all there is to it. She sacrificed tremendously."
Jake's wife Jane said, "I'm really, really proud of him. He works so hard. He doesn't have a coach to push him. He's just very self-disciplined."
"You know, I didn't play any college volleyball," Jake said. "All-Americans, Olympians, and here comes this little kid out of Bountiful, Utah. It's fun to compete against them."
He hates to lose, even when it might be in his best interest.
"He is so ultra-competitive it's very hard to just come out and play for fun," his family said. "So we'll win once in a while, but not very often."
The MVP from Bountiful is only a few bumps, spikes, and sets away from making his Olympic dreams.
Gibb is off to a good start. He came in second in the first match over the weekend. He plays again this weekend. You can catch Gibb playing on the AVP tour later this summer on KSL.

Gibb and Rosenthal seek next step
Pair hopes familiarity will help them win more titles
By Colleen Murray / AVP.com
Partner-switching isn't exactly a rarity on the AVP tour, but this year is slightly extreme. A staggering 70 percent of the teams in Miami were new partnerships. With so many new teams on the AVP tour, Jake Gibb and Sean Rosenthal are doing all that they can to make sure they know each other better than their opponents know each other. For Gibb and "Rosie," that means training, practicing, working out, and even golfing together.
"Yeah, we spend way too much time together," Gibb said.
"I'm a little sick of him by now," Rosenthal joked.
Other teams are probably getting just as tired of Rosenthal and Gibb. The two have played in 15 AVP events together and showed up in eight semifinals. Gibb and Rosenthal have never finished lower than ninth.
This off-season, the pair focused on turning those semifinal appearances into wins. They won the first event last year in Fort Lauderdale, which was their first team event, and then didn't end up in the winner's circle after that.
"We've gotten to a lot of finals, and hopefully we can put it all together, come the end of the tournament. We play well throughout the tournament. Then we get to the final and either we don't show up to play our best or we don't play that well in the final. Not knocking the other team that eventually beat us, but I know that we can play better," Rosenthal said.
The Miami Open offered more of the same for Rosenthal and Gibb. The pair made it to the finals but took a second at the hands of Todd Rogers and Phil Dalhausser.
While second-place isn't chump change, Rosenthal and Gibb recognize their potential. The 6'8 Gibb is fairly new to the beach volleyball. He didn't play volleyball in college, starting at age 21. By the time Rosenthal was 21, the Redondo Beach, Calif., native had already earned a 5th place finish on the AVP tour. Now at the ripe old age of 26, Rosenthal is trying to channel his raw talent into a finished product with Gibb by his side.
"Maybe we'll help out team chemistry with all the training in the off-season, the gym, the endurance. We train. We're a young team. He's young to the sport, I'm young overall, not saying [Jake is] old. Just now we're both another year experienced," Rosenthal said.
Rosenthal is hoping this experience will translate into maturity and stronger performances.
"We'd like to win some more finals, be consistent throughout the whole year. We're a little up and down. We were in a final and then would get a seventh or a fifth. We want to be really consistent all year, and hopefully close out," Rosenthal said.
Rosenthal and Gibb's training is important not only for their chances at getting the big yellow check on Sundays, but also critical in their opportunity to work toward the gold in Beijing in 2008.
"We're all competing for two spots, as of last year, we played well on that tour and hope to continue that, we'd love to represent the USA in '08 in Beijing," Rosenthal said. Rosenthal played well enough to earn 2006 FIVB Rookie of the Year. He tries not to let the Olympics dangling bother him.
"There's very, very few people in the world who can say they had a chance to qualify to compete in the Olympics. And we get to say that, and hopefully we'll do our job and get to play," Rosenthal said.
As far as the AVP is concerned, Rosenthal and Gibb are no longer content with getting their chance to play or being the team that knows each other best; they want to be the only team to end the weekend on a win.

Building a beach at a ballpark
Rangers park sits beside AVP Tour site
By Mike Scarr / AVP.com
From strikeout to side-out, two sports will share the spotlight at the Rangers Ballpark in Arlington this weekend.
The AVP Crocs Tour will travel to Arlington to play the Cuervo Gold Crown Dallas Open, which starts Thursday with qualifying rounds. A co-partnership between the Hicks Sports Marketing Group and AVP, the Dallas Open is designed to cross-promote two sports while also building a fan base.
"They're using their expertise and infrastructure to do something more than just baseball and hockey in a big way," said AVP general manager of events and partnerships, Gabby Roe. "We want to utilize what they bring to the table combined with the entity and property and the brand of AVP, and that is a pretty lethal combination."
It will basically be an inside/outside affair with the Rangers competing on the field as the A's visit for a three-game weekend series. Friday and Saturday will both be under the lights at 7:05 p.m. CT while Sunday's game will be at 2:05 p.m.
The tour will set up outside, occupying a space adjacent to the stadium that will be transformed into a temporary beach area -- 3,150,000 pounds of sand worth. Action will take place on seven courts during the four-day event with the main draw beginning Friday at 8:00 a.m. CT.
It is the combination of beach and baseball that intrigued the Hicks Group, owners of both the Rangers and the NHL Dallas Stars. In conjunction with Steiner and Associates, the Hicks Group is also moving forward with Glorypark, a mixed-use real estate development that will feature both residential and commercial properties in an area near the Ballpark that is currently used for parking.
"Part of our long-term vision is a number of events and the AVP fits into that plan," said Hicks Sports Marketing Group senior vice president Brad Alberts, who contacted the tour about a year ago to explore the idea. "(The AVP) is a cool, summertime type of event and one, among others, that we'd like to bring to the area."
The baseball part is easy; the Rangers have their field. But volleyball needs courts, specifically sand in the outdoor beach variety. While it's a natural occurrence at venues like Huntington Beach, Arlington is hundreds of miles from the Gulf.
Roe said transporting the sand, both in and then out of the venue, is always a unique process with cost only being part of the equation. He compared it to snow: No two flakes are identical. While the man-made courts are invariably shallower than the natural ones, setting up in an otherwise non-beach area has its advantages.
"Given the flow of traffic at sporting events it is somewhat easier at a venue like this than it is at real beaches or parks that aren't really made for spectator sporting events," Roe said. "With parking and infrastructure and things of that nature this is actually easier than Manhattan Beach or Hermosa Beach that aren't actually designed to have thousands upon thousands of people heading to one spot for over a weekend."
It's also about growth.
The Hicks Group is looking to draw people to its new development and add lifestyle to the area. The tour is trying to reach out to fans wherever it can. It's relatively easy to attract fans in Southern California, where the game is played on beaches up and down the coast. But the AVP is an 18-stop tour that will travel to cities like Atlanta, Ga., and Louisville, Ky., in addition to Arlington so taking the game to the fans is part of the mission.
"If we were restricted to only going to places where we have existing beaches we would be under-servicing our fan base," Roe said. "While the television broadcasts go everywhere across the country and around the world it is nice to allow our fans to see us in person without forcing to have to be on a beach to do it."
Neither Roe nor Alberts believes there will be any logistical conflicts as play outside the stadium should be completed at least an hour before first pitch of each Rangers game. What they do see is a partnership, one that could extend beyond the initial three-year contract.
"Hicks Sports Marketing Group is excited to bring beach volleyball back to the north Texas area," Alberts said. "We feel that it is real important longterm."
Mike Scarr is a senior reporter for AVP.com.

Dallas Qualifying Round opens
72 teams vying for spot in Main Draw
By Robert Falkoff / AVP.com
The top-seeded qualifier teams of Jeff Carlucci/Adam Roberts and Claire Robertson/Julie Romias were off and running Thursday morning as 42 men's teams and 31 women's teams attempted to punch their tickets to the main draw of the AVP Cuervo Gold Crown Dallas Open.
Besides Carlucci and Roberts, other men's teams expected to produce strong showings included Mike Morrison/Ty Tramblie, David Fischer/Scott Hill, Billy Allen/AJ Mihalic and Dane Jensen/Mike Placek.
On the women's side, teams to watch in addition to Robertson/Romias included Tara Kuk/Kim Whitney, Jenelle Koester/Catie Mintz, Jill Changaris/Sara Dukes and Angela McHenry/Lisa Rutledge.
Four teams from each gender advance to the main draw. The Dallas Open, which is being played on the complex of Rangers Ballpark in Arlington -- home of the Texas Rangers -- had no significant upsets in the early portion of the qualifier.
The early action gave local fans of the Dallas Cowboys an opportunity to cheer for a former Cowboys hero. Jay Novacek, a tight end who was part of the Cowboys' glory run in the 1990s, competed in the qualifier with partner Curtis Pitts. Novacek and Pitts lost, 21-7, 21-6, to the unit of Nate Hagstrom and Tim May. Novacek and Pitts went in seeded 40th among the 42 teams.

Novacek falls early in qualifier
Former NFL TE no match for volleyballers
By Mike Scarr / AVP.com
ARLINGTON, Texas -- As a five-time Pro Bowler in the National Football League, Jay Novacek understood the importance of a thorough training camp.
The former Dallas Cowboy tight end just wishes he had gone through a real training camp instead of a 30-minute cram course before trying his luck Thursday morning in the qualifier round of the Dallas Open.
Paired with Curtis Pitts, Novacek quickly learned the challenges of competing against those experienced athletes who play beach volleyball with a high degree of skill. Nate Hagstrom and Tim May put it on Pitts and Novacek 21-7, 21-6, prompting the 44-year-old Novacek to marvel at the athleticism on the AVP Tour.
"These guys are really good and I knew it was going to be that way," Novacek said. "I wish we would have had about two weeks to get ready."
The Novacek-Pitts team was the 40th seed among 42 teams.
"I'm surprised we were seeded that high," Novacek said with a chuckle. "As I look back on it, I think I did pretty decent considering the time spent in preparing for this. The last time I played volleyball was seven years ago when I was on vacation in Cancun."
Novacek certainly has the athletic pedigree. Besides contributing to the dynamic Dallas offense in the 1990s and playing on three Super Bowl championship teams, Novacek was a former collegiate decathlon champion at the University of Wyoming.
But after getting some pointers from his "coaches" -- the Team Gorgeous unit of Suzanne Stonebarger and Michelle More -- Novacek and his partner failed to keep pace with the Hagstrom-May attack. There were some Novacek-Pitts highlights, but not nearly enough of them.
"I had a great time, which is really what it was all about," Novacek said. "You really gain an appreciation for how tough it is to play volleyball at that level. The people who do this for a living are just unbelievable."
Novacek left his mark on the football world before retiring in 1995. Once a favorite target of quarterback Troy Aikman, Novacek made defenses wary of his presence by running precise routes in the middle of the field. That made things easier for running back Emmitt Smith and wideout Michael Irvin.
"I'm very fortunate to be able to get out there and play volleyball," Novacek said. "My body is in pretty good condition after a long NFL career. My back was a little sore this morning, but it loosened up as we got going."
Novacek owns the Upper84 Ranch, a private hunting grounds, in Brady, Neb., which covers 3,500 acres. That ranch has taken up much of his time since he hung up his cleats. He and his family recently moved back to the Fort Worth area.
Novacek didn't tell any of his former Cowboys teammates about the AVP appearance.
"I was playing at 8 a.m., and most of them are lucky to get up that early," Novacek said.
Novacek believes that, whether it's football, volleyball or another sport, the movement of the hips can tell a lot about the success of a player. Novacek moved his hips well enough to catch 422 passes for 4,620 yards and 30 touchdowns in 11 seasons.
Relaxing in the AVP media tent after Thursday's competition, Novacek said the memories of the Super Bowl years in Dallas never fade. The old Cowboys still convene from time to time.
"There has always been something that got us back together," Novacek said, "Troy's induction into the Hall of Fame, Michael's induction this year.
"I hope he invites me. If he doesn't, I'll crash the party anyway. I'm going."
The old Cowboys seem to be going everywhere and doing everything. If it's not Novacek making a guest appearance in an AVP qualifier, it's Smith showing his moves on Dancing with the Stars.
If it's a choice between volleyball and dancing as an after-football activity, Novacek will stick with volleyball every time.
"I'm a lot better at this," Novacek said, "than the cha-cha-cha."

Karch on all things volleyball
A Q&A with a man in his fourth decade on tour
By Walter Villa / AVP.com
It is almost impossible to ponder what the AVP will be like next year without Charles Frederick Kiraly, because the man they call "Karch" has been the face of pro beach volleyball since the inception of the tour.
"It's pretty scary," said Kiraly, 46, who is retiring at the end of this season. "The AVP's first-ever professional event was in 1978, and I played in it (he did not accept prize money at the time so he could keep his amateur status). And it's pretty scary to think that here I am still playing almost 30 years later."
It has been especially scary for his opponents, who have seen him win a record 148 AVP tournaments -- not to mention three Olympic gold medals, three national championships at UCLA, a state prep championship at Santa Barbara and two world Player of the Year awards.
Kiraly, who is of Hungarian descent and was born in Jackson, Mich., recently sat for a 45-minute interview in which he discussed everything from his favorite hecklers to where he keeps his gold medals. Here are the highlights of that interview:

WHAT CONVINCED YOU THAT THIS WOULD BE YOUR LAST YEAR?
"There has to be an end at some point. I went through some aches and pains last year. I injured my knee. I worked hard to get back healthy. But I don't want to get too much wear and tear on my body."

WHAT DO YOU WANT TO ACCOMPLISH THIS YEAR?
"I'd love to win one more time at least. I want to try to push the record for oldest player to win a title up a couple of years (he already holds the mark with a win at age 44). I broke my own record four or five times, which I guess means I am getting really old. Beyond that, I want to get a chance to thank the fans who have supported me and the tour all these years."

HOW HAS THE GAME CHANGED?
"When I first started playing beach volleyball in 1978, the guys just stood back on defense. There was no blocking. You weren't allowed to break the vertical plane of the net. You had to stay on your side of the net. Then the rules changed about six years later. Then jump-serving came in to the game.
"Six years ago, they shrunk the court by 20 percent. They changed the scoring system from scoring only on your serve to scoring on every point. The serve can now hit the net. Bigger players are coming in to the game as a result of the shrunken court. The men's and women's tours are now together. The tour was really only fully unified in 2001. Equal prize money has come into play.
"Other than all that, it is the exact same game!"

WHERE DO YOU SEE THE TOUR 10 OR 20 YEARS FROM NOW?
"For one thing, I think you will see more international players on the tour. As the prize money on this tour grows, I would expect players in Europe to try to make a dent here. I am also hoping to see the growth of a feeder tour that would give more opportunities for players to get their feet wet -- or their feet sandy -- and learn the game of beach volleyball."

WOULD YOU LIKE TO PLAY A ROLE IN ADVISING THE LEAGUE? IF NOT, WHAT ARE YOUR PLANS FOR NEXT YEAR AND BEYOND?
"I have always had a good relationship with the AVP. Maybe if the AVP were interested at some point in having me play some sort of official role in the league, I guess I would have to seriously consider that.
"But I have started a volleyball academy that will start this year. I am doing some more coaching. I will be doing television work on the tour. So even when I am not playing, I will be at all the events. So there is plenty on my plate right now."

WHAT ARE YOUR PROUDEST MEMORIES AS A PLAYER?
"I am very proud of my season in 1992, when Kent Steffes and I won 13 tournaments in a row, tying the all-time record, which Kerri (Walsh) and Misty (May-Treanor) have since broken. "

ANY CHANCE YOU WILL CHANGE YOUR MIND ABOUT RETIRING?
"Not that I am aware of. I don't like to do the "retire, I'm back, retire, I'm back" kind of thing.

WHERE DO YOU KEEP YOUR GOLD MEDALS?
"They are stuck away in a drawer. If you were to walk in to our house, you would find very little evidence of my career because I don't want it to be a shrine to my accomplishments. I want it to be a home to our family.
"The only time I really bring 'em out is when I visit schools or other groups. I enjoy sharing them with people and allowing them to see how heavy they feel. That is the only time I really bring them out, so people can enjoy touching or holding them. People love to take pictures with my gold medals."

HOW DID THE NEON PINK HAT TRADITION START?
"That season in which Kent and I won 13 in a row, early in that run, I had four different colors of hats, one of which was pink. I just got on a roll with the pink hat. So what started out as a superstition grew into a tradition and an easy way for my family to find me at tournaments because I am the only one with cojones big enough to wear a pink hat.
"I have gotten a lot of heckles because of that hat. But luckily, I am married, and I don't have to worry about people challenging my manhood.
"Now the hat has gone form superstition to tradition to almost curse. Now I can't not wear it. I have to finish out one more year with the pink hat."

DID YOU REALLY GET HECKLED BECAUSE OF YOUR HAT?
"Oh, yeah. One of the best heckles I ever heard was a few years ago from one of my opponents, who was just having fun with me. He said. 'Hey, Karch, the '80s called, and they want your pink hat back.'"

ANY OTHER FAVORITE HECKLES?
"We used to play indoors in New York in Madison Square Garden. And there were a couple of guys who sat right behind our players bench, and they used to think it was really stupid of me to wear a watch during a match. So they kept saying, 'Hey Karch, what time is it? What time is it now?'
"And I yelled, 'It's time for you to think up a new question!'"

IS THERE SOMETHING ABOUT YOU SPORTS FANS MIGHT BE SURPRISED TO KNOW?
"How much we have to hydrate out here in this kind of heat and humidity. I think the most I have ever taken down in one day of fluids is five gallons -- a gallon per match. If we didn't replace our fluids, we would probably keel over and die. I remember a player who didn't do as good a job at that and went down to Brazil for a tournament weighing 220 and came back at 202. He lost 10 percent of his body weight from the heat and humidity. It is brutal.
"As hard as it is in the NBA or other sports, we do it for an hour or an hour-and-a-half, and then we rest for a little while, and then we do it again. You might have to do that 5 times.
"We play at the world's most beautiful beaches but in the world's most challenging conditions. It is not like you play one match and you go back to air conditioning. We do it all day long."

DO YOUR SONS, KRISTIAN, 16, AND KORY, 15, WANT TO FOLLOW IN YOUR FOOTSTEPS?
"I almost went overboard in making sure I didn't push them into volleyball, that it was their decision to play. I just didn't want them to have to have a certain reputation to live up to.
"But they have chosen to play in the last year or two. They have gotten a lot more serious about it. They are playing indoors for their high school team (St. Margaret's in San Clemente, Calif.), and I am co-coaching the team.
"It is really neat to see them flourishing and learning the game. But if they didn't want to play, that would be just fine with me.
"They have to find their own way, find the things they really enjoy, the things that will allow them to find fulfillment in life and the things that will allow them to make a positive contribution in life."

DO THEY REMIND YOU OF YOURSELF AT THAT AGE?
"It does remind me of what it was like when I was 15, and I couldn't get enough of volleyball, playing it in every spare moment.
"I feel really fortunate to have grown up in a time before video games. We would just go out and play baseball or other sports with the neighborhood kids. Pickup games are a long lost art. Everything today seems to have to be organized. Whatever happened to getting together with the kids and figuring out a game, making up a new game?
"Kids need unorganized free play. Figure out how to agree on the rules. Problem solved. Play for the fun of it.
"I think that is why I am still playing and still loving the game. I didn't get into volleyball because of fame. There was no fame, no prize money, no television. I just got into it because I loved doing it, I was pretty good at it, and I kept getting better. A lot of that was in the summer with my buddies away from the coach."

Upsets abound in women's qualifier
Two double-digit seeds advance to main draw
By Monique Moyal / AVP.com
DALLAS -- Coming on the heels of an AVP Crocs Tour stop in Miami, Fla., filled with many surprises and firsts, the women's qualifying round of the 2007 Cuervo Gold Crown Dallas Open continued right where Miami left off.
The biggest event that transpired on the women's side was the unexpected qualification of No. 10-seeded Angie Hall and Laura Ratto, their first ever appearance in a main draw, individually or as partners -- this coming after last weekend, when the pair was given the 24th qualifier seed and finished 10th in the qualies.
Their road to the main draw wasn't an easy one. Hall and Ratto battled it out against second-seeded Tara Kuk and Kim Whitney.
Kuk and Whitney's first set seemed to indicate that their second seed would translate into a main draw appearance, winning that game 21-12. But the tides turned in favor of the underdog midway between the second set. Hall and Ratto went on to win each of the last two sets, 21-18 and 15-13.
Immediately after earning their first bid into the main draw, the San Diego locals were greeted with a tackle from neighbors and fifth-seeded Angela McHenry and Lisa Rutledge.
At first, Hall and Ratto could not put into words their excitement for making their first main draw.
But then Hall managed to say, "We've been working so hard together for like a year and a half, and it just feels so good to finally get what we've been working for."
A similar outcome for No. 14 Nicki Fusco and Gina Kirstein occurred simultaneously with Hall and Ratto's upset.
The pair knocked off sixth-seeded Krystal Jackson and Tiffany Rodriguez despite losing the first set, 21-15. Jackson and Rodriguez changed the pace and took the match, 21-18 and 15-12.
McHenry and Rutledge could not manage to find the same luck as their fellow San Diegans, falling in two sets, 21-16 and 21-16, to No. 4 Jill Changaris and Sara Dukes.
But Dukes gave credit all around the table for the degree of competition she found in this weekend's qualifiers.
"The qualifier is never easy, no matter how you get through it, it's never easy," Dukes said. "It's always tough, so you kind of just gotta grit your teeth and claw your way through it."
Top-seeded Claire Roberts and Julie Romias, however, came through qualifiers smoothly, never dropping a set. The duo pushed past No. 8 Dana Schilling and Alicia Zamparelli who, like Roberts and Romias, won their first two matches in two sets.
With scores of 21-15 and 21-18, Robertson and Romias secured entry into the main draw once again in 2007.

Tramblie battles injury, moves on
The No. 2-seeded team finds a way to play Friday
By Robert Falkoff / AVP.com
ARLINGTON, Texas -- Ty Tramblie could have thrown up the white flag when he suffered a sprained left ankle early in Thursday's qualifier at the AVP Cuervo Gold Crown Dallas Open.
But there was no surrender in Tramblie or partner Mike Morrison as they made sure that at least one of the top two seeds on the men's side advanced to the main draw. With the injured ankle heavily taped, Tramblie moved around gingerly following each point. But when the ball was in the air, he ignored the pain and reacted swiftly and decisively.
Tramblie and Morrison, the No. 2 seed, got past Leonardo Moraes and Jim Nichols, 21-12, 21-15, to advance to the main draw. Jeff Carlucci and Adam Roberts, who went in as the No. 1 seed, were upset by No. 17 seed Joaquin Acosta and Gaston Macau.
Tramblie and Morrison were pushed to a third game by Everett Matthews and Ivan Mercer early on, and that's when Tramblie suffered the sprained ankle.
"I wanted to win so bad that nothing else really mattered," Tramblie said. "I was kind of cramping because I was favoring my ankle. I was thinking, 'We've got to get this over with.'
"Going home and not qualifying? There was no choice there. I had to go as hard as I could. You spend a lot of money to come out here."
Tramblie said he expected to be ready to go for main draw play on Friday.
"I'll wrap it, ice it and it will be fine," he said.
While Morrison and Tramblie were living up to their high seed, the No. 3-seeded unit of David Fischer and Scott Hill also punched one of the four tickets to the main draw.
Fischer and Hill defeated Russ Marchewka and Fernando Sabla, 19-21, 21-16 and 15-12, to qualify for play on Friday.
"We pulled together," Hill said. "We started to pick up on what Sabla was doing and where he was looking to go. Our defense really helped us."
The opportunity to play double elimination on Friday has Hill excited about the prospects.
"With no single elimination, the pressure is kind of off in our eyes," Hill said. "It will be fun."
The Hill-Fischer team has become used to playing a lot of the qualifiers with a high seed.
"A lot of people say there is pressure because you don't want to get beat by a lower seed," Hill said, "but our outlook is just that we have a job to do and we need to get it done. I don't think it really puts pressure on us at all."
The No. 8-seeded team of Jon Mesko and Eyal Zimet got to the main draw by defeating Acosta and Macau 21-14, 21-12. It marked the first time the Mesko-Zimet duo has played together.
"I thought we started a little slow, but we came on and had a good day," Zimet said. "I like this hard-packed surface and I think it plays to our advantage. It's going to be great to play again. We can't wait to play against the big guys tomorrow."
The biggest surprise qualifier was the unit of Skyler Davis and Derek Zimmerman, which came in as the No. 28 seed. Davis and Zimmerman took out Seth Burnham and Tony Pray to reach the main draw.
With only four of the 42 men's teams making it to the main draw, Tramblie looked at the day as a nervous experience.
"We've got to get out of these qualifiers," Tramblie said. "We're close."
And they did.

Zimet, Wong to square off in beach volleyball
Honolulu Advertiser Staff
Former Rainbow Eyal Zimet will meet former Buffanblu Kevin Wong in the opening round of the $200,000 Cuervo Gold Crown Dallas Open on Friday. The second AVP Crocs Tour event of the year is being played adjacent to Rangers Ballpark in Arlington, Texas, with 3,150,000 pounds of sand brought in to create the seven courts.
Zimet and partner Jon Mesko won three matches today to advance out of qualifying. Wong and partner Karch Kiraly are seeded 10th. The top-seeded team is made up of Punahou graduates Stein Metzger and Mike Lambert. Punahou and UH graduate Sean Scott is seeded fourth and Wong's brother, Scott, and partner Hans Stolfus, a former UH player, are 12th.
Former Dallas Cowboy Jay Novacek lost in the first round of qualifying, as did former Rainbow Wahine All-American Victoria Prince. UH alumna Heidi Ilustre is seeded 11th in the women's draw. Former 'Bow Kimo Tuyay fell in the second round of qualifying.

Top seeds ready for rebound
No. 1's hope to get back at No. 2's in Dallas
By Monique Moyal / AVP.com
The main draw of the AVP Dallas Open begins Friday, and storylines abound. Will Todd Rogers and Phil Dalhausser continue their run of three straight wins or will Stein Metzger and Mike Lambert (or another team) knock them off? Will Misty-May Treanor and Kerri Walsh regain their place atop the women's field, or will the parity we saw last week in Miami continue? Here's a look at those topics and the rest of what to expect on Friday in Dallas.

Streaky Finish
After claiming their third-straight AVP Crocs Title, carrying over from the 2006 season, second-seeded Todd Rogers and Phil Dalhausser will look to make it four in a row when they face the winner of a match between No. 15 Brent Doble/Ty Loomis and No. 18 Brad Keenan/John Mayer at approximately 10:30 a.m. tomorrow.
No. 3 Jake Gibb and Sean Rosenthal will look to put a stop to that streak, as Rogers and Dalhausser ended Gibb's own streak of two consecutive inaugural AVP Crocs Tour titles last weekend.

Back at One
On the women's side, the biggest shock in Miami was the elimination of No. 1 Misty May-Treanor and Kerri Walsh in the semifinals to second-seeded Elaine Youngs and Nicole Branagh who went on to win the Cuervo Gold Crown Miami Open.
With only their second absence from the championship round since joining the Tour in 2003, May-Treanor and Walsh will be back for revenge in Dallas this weekend.
With a first-round bye, the top-seeded duo faces the winner of No. 17 Katie Lindquist and Tracy Lindquist, and No. 16 Alicia Polzin and Paula Roca, who will play each other in the first match of the day at 8 a.m.
The Lindquist sisters, should they emerge victoriously and play May-Treanor and Walsh, will be hungry for revenge. Despite their loss to the pair, the sisters were able to take one set from Walsh and May-Treanor in Miami last weekend. The second match is tentatively scheduled for 9:30 a.m.
Similar to the tale of May-Treanor and Walsh, No. 1 Mike Lambert and Stein Metzger dropped down to the Contender's Bracket on the men's side last weekend, when they fell early on to No. 13 Matt Olson and Jason Ring. From the other side of the bracket, the first-seeded pair could not surpass Gibb and Rosenthal and walked away from Miami with a third-place finish.
Lambert and Metzger will look to get back on top this weekend when they take on the winner of No. 17 Albert Hannemann/Ed Ratledge and No. 16 Dain Blanton/Canyon Ceman, who are set to open Friday's play for the men at 8 a.m.

New Beginnings
Another key match to watch for this weekend will begin at about 10 a.m., when eighth-seeded Jennifer Boss and April Ross take on the winner of the match against No. 24 Angie Hall/Laura Ratto and No. 9 Jenny Pavley/Sarah Straton.
Hall and Ratto's upset of the second-seeded qualifying team sent the pair to their first ever main draw match. The two will rely on their adrenaline to attempt an even bigger upset on Friday.
Watching the Boss/Ross match from the sidelines will be Keao Burdine, like Boss a fellow USC Trojan who, at the conclusion of last season, was set to pair up with Boss again in 2007. Burdine's decision to play in Puerto Rico during the off-season, though, caused her to miss the first tournament of 2007 and lose her partner to a fellow USC alum. Boss had to decide between the two and went in favor of Ross this weekend, after the pair's appearance in the finals last weekend.

End of the Road
Karch Kiraly will continue his goodbye tour this weekend in Dallas. Friday, partnered with Kevin Wong, the 10-seeded pair will try to better their fifth-place showing last weekend to give Kiraly another shot at a title before he says goodbye. The duo will face off against No. 23 Jon Mesko and Eyal Zimet at 9:45 Friday morning.

Local Flavor
No. 14 Austin Rester and his partner Aaron Wachtfogel should bring significant fan support from Dallas this weekend, as Rester is an alumnus of Texas Tech, and was raised in Grapevine, Texas, 15 miles outside of Dallas.
With a little help from Wachtfogel, Rester tied his personal best ninth-place finish in Miami and will look to top that tomorrow morning. Should the pair win their first match, they will take on Gibb and Rosenthal at about 9:45 a.m.
Another familiar face is that of Ashley Ivy, whose hometown, Arlington, is the site of this weekend's tourney. Partnered with Heather Lowe, the two will try to outplay their No. 21 seed against No. 12 Angie Akers and Brooke Hanson at 8 a.m. tomorrow.
Last weekend, ninth-seeded Carrie Dodd and Tatiana Minello fell to the eventual Miami champions Youngs and Branagh to earn a seventh-place finish. This weekend, they have considerable incentive to challenge that finish, as Dodd is an alumnus of the University of Texas and will have local support cheering her on.

Priorities in order, Lee returns to tour
Lee makes return to tour in home state
By Colleen Murray / AVP.com
While the AVP hasn't seen Texas in seven years, it has only been one year since Texas resident Jaimie Lee played with the AVP. Lee's hiatus, however, had nothing to do with the absence of the tour in the Lone Star State.
"I had a baby," Lee said simply.
While Lee may not live the life of a typical beach volleyball player, in light of her years off and her Austin, Texas, residency, neither of these factors should indicate that she is anything less than dedicated to the sport. To the contrary, she shows her commitment to the sand by how hard she has to try to keep beach in her life.
Maybe her commitment to beach volleyball is bolstered by the fact that the sport is in her family. Her husband, Brian Hosfeld, is the winningest volleyball coach in Baylor history. Lee and Hosfeld welcomed their second child in August and Lee didn't waste any time getting back on the beach.
"I started training as soon as the doctor said it was O.K.," Lee said.
For Lee, this meant getting back out as early as September. Even while she was pregnant, Lee swam to keep herself in shape.
"I had always planned to come back," Lee said.
It wouldn't be the first time that Lee made a transition back to competition. Lee didn't start the tour right after undergrad or an indoor career. After her graduation from Notre Dame, Lee went to Baylor University in Waco, Texas, and graduated in 2001 with her Master's in Sports Management, working as an assistant volleyball coach and a part-time lecturer.
When she finally did hit the AVP, Lee made a splash. She played the first half of the season with Danalee Bragado and the second half with Kelly Kuebler. Lee and Bragado took home ninth place in Lee's second tournament. Bragado, a Notre Dame grad won Rookie of the Year honors.
But even after such success, Lee took the 2004 season off to have her first child.
What makes training hard, along with recovering from pregnancy, is not being in Manhattan Beach, Calif., or Redondo Beach, Calif., like most of the AVP players during the off-season. While players who live in these beach towns have the luxury of practicing against AVP pros, Lee has to rely on the players she can find near her.
"Typically, we don't have the access to players, all the good players to train with, and we have limited courts. But there's enough people in Austin, just enough to get by," Lee said. "The volleyball community is pretty small, and in Austin, not a lot of people play beach. So we all kind of pool together."
But Lee didn't find her partner in Austin. Keao Burdine had a strong freshman season with April Ross last year. The two notched a pair of ninth-place finishes but parted ways. Burdine spent the off-season playing in Puerto Rico and had been slated to play with Jennifer Boss when she returned. Burdine's season ran long in Puerto Rico and Boss paired with Ross for the Miami Open and took lost in the final. Burdine was left without a partner, which is when Lee stepped in.
"It was kind of dumb luck, because she had just come back from Puerto Rico, and I didn't have a partner. I wasn't actually gonna play in this event. I was gonna wait and start in Huntington. But it was so close to home. And I really wanted to play and she was available," Lee said.
The spur-of-the-moment nature of the partnership left the two with little time to practice. With their opening game on Friday, Lee and Burdine found 30 minutes to hit the beach on Thursday. Not surprisingly, it took the two, who came in as the 20th seed, a little time to get comfortable with each other on the court.
In their first game, Lee and Burdine played Diane Pascua and Heidi Ilustre. The first set's result didn't bode well for the new partners. Lee and Burdine fell 21-9.
"I think the first game was a little bit of jitters, and we had hardly ever stepped on the court together. To get that out of the way, it was kind of unfortunate that it took us so long to get rolling but by game two, it was a lot better," Lee said.
Lee and Burdine hung in tight during the whole game and forced overtime. Despite their effort, Lee and Burdine eventually fell to 13th-seeded Ilustre and Pascua.
"I think that we both feel a little bit better after that second game," Lee said.
The loss set them up in a match with No. 3 Annett Davis and Jenny Johnson Jordan, a tough opponent for the first round of the contender's bracket. Davis and Johnson Jordan have been playing together since college, and Burdine and Lee's half-day's worth of familiarity couldn't compete. Burdine and Lee again forced their opponents to take it to extra points, but Burdine and Lee eventually lost the first game, 34-32, and the second, 21-12.
While Lee may not have had the advantage of competitive time on the tour in the past year, she had her home-state advantage. While her family couldn't make the three-hour drive from Austin, she had other hometown fans pulling for her.
"There's enough people from Austin that I heard some people yelling," Lee said.
Lee hopes the cheers follow her all the way to Huntington as her second comeback season gets underway.

Texan starts fast but fails to advance
Austin Rester had a solid showing near home
By Monique Moyal / AVP.com
ARLINGTON, Texas -- There's nothing like a home-field advantage. With at least three teams from the men's and women's main draws hailing from Texas, everyone was able to enjoy the taste of home cooking.
Despite the 9 a.m. start time, one tent was filled beyond capacity with local onlookers supporting an early men's match between No. 14 Austin Rester and Aaron Wachtfogel.
And thanks to the added crowd support, the two pulled out a come-from-behind win to send No. 19 Jason Lee and Chad Turner to the Contender's Bracket, 21-19, 17-21, 15-12.
"It's funny because, apparently, my family is not very volleyball-savvy. Most of the time they don't really know when to cheer," said Rester, a native of Grapevine, Texas. "It was a rough match because they didn't really have much to cheer for in the first match."
In the first set, the score remained tight, but one small key to Wachtfogel and Rester's ability to stay on top throughout the game was their boisterous communication.
Lee and Turner did not seem to be on the same page as frequently as their opponents did. And this is only Rester and Wachtfogel's second official tournament as a team.
The biggest comeback, however, came in the third set, with Rester/Wachtfogel trailing 1-4 early on. Things started to turn around after two nasty back-to-back aces by Rester.
He continued his heroics in front of the home crowd, after a long rally complete with both teams crawling in the sand, with a block that Lee/Turner could not answer, taking the score to 8-5.
Rester and Wachtfogel never looked back after a slew of "Alright, Austin!" chants and later screams, led by his father.
The added pressure of performing in front of his family may have been a factor, but towards the end of the match, Rester did not display any such signs.
"I don't want to come out here and collapse in front of all of them," said Rester. "I don't expect to come out and win every match that we want to, but I don't want to come out and just not show up. I want to show them that I have been working hard for something."
His extended family and friends were able to see what exactly he has been working on in the off-season in the tournament's second round of the day.
Later in the afternoon, with two tents filled over capacity, the hometown favorites continued against third-seeded Jake Gibb and Sean Rosenthal with a fiercely-battled match more with a championship feel.
"I think we match up pretty well, I played them twice last year, and we didn't fare so well, but I have a different partner and I'm a different player now," said Rester. "But they're good and we should give them a run for their money."
In the second set, Rester went up for a huge block which he successfully landed, but on the way down, his right knee connected with the pole and resulted in a temporary pause for medical assistance. Although he has his left ankle taped as a result of surgery earlier in the off-season, it was no factor in this injury.
Five minutes later, Rester got up and walked around the sand, limping, but still managed to connect for a kill to put his team two points away from a second-set win over Rosenthal and Gibb.
That would be the only victory for the two, who came dangerously close to throwing Rosenthal and Gibb into the Contender's Bracket, as they finished 21-17, 18-21 and 15-11 before heading to the other side of the brackets.
"It was a battle … and they're a great team, they're a good young team," said Rosenthal. "We just expect to play our game and do or best and hopefully that's enough. They're a good team you know, I wish them the best to battle back."
Rosenthal/Gibb will continue on in the Winner's Bracket to face second-seeded Todd Rogers and Phil Dalhausser in a rematch of last weekend's AVP Cuervo Gold Crown Miami Open.
And the local men's crowd had its cheering prematurely come to an end this afternoon, when Rester and Wachtfogel squared off against No. 20 Adam Jewell and Jose Loiola but fell, 21-12, 18-21, 15-7.

The chalk advances for the women
Few upsets in the first day of women's play
By Colleen Murray / AVP.com
ARLINGTON, Texas -- For the women, it wasn't easy being a winner. The winner's bracket had to play three consecutive games to set up the quarterfinals, while contenders only had to play one match on top of a game they lost that sent them there. The winners, however, weren't complaining.
In the first day of action, the winner's bracket quarterfinal match-ups were set. No. 1 Misty May-Treanor and Kerri Walsh are set to play No. 5 Dianne DeNecochea and Barbra Fontana, while the Cinderella team for the weekend, No. 14 Angela Lewis and Priscilla Lima will battle the Miami Open champions, second-seeded Nicole Branagh and Elaine Youngs.
While the men's finals are Saturday, the women's final set for Sunday gives teams the luxury of playing less games per day. For the women's side, Saturday should be mostly contender's brackets games.
Unlike the men on Friday, a higher-seeding nearly guaranteed a win for women. The exceptions to this rule were a sight to be seen, though.
No. 12 Angie Akers and Brooke Hanson vs. No. 21 Ashley Ivy and Heather Lowe
In the first game against Akers and Hanson, it took Ivy a while to get the hometown vibe. She and Lowe dropped the first game against Akers, Lowe's former partner, and Hanson, 22-20. Ivy and Lowe rallied, however. The partners, who took home 17th last week in Miami, pulled off a 22-20 victory against the 12th-seeders.
Neither team showed any sign of being ready for the contender's bracket. The match went all the way to 21-19, and Lowe and Ivy, the Arlington product, came out victorious, earning them the only upset victory of the first round.
No. 14 Angela Lewis and Priscilla Lima vs. No. 3 Annett Davis and Jenny Johnson Jordan
With the set-up of the women's bracket, the top eight teams automatically advance to the second round. Their first game is in the second round of the winner's bracket. For third-seeded Davis and Johnson Jordan, their first match-up was against Lewis and Lima, a team fresh off a win against Jennifer Ruen and Janelle Snyder.
The center court match-up took Davis, Johnson Jordan and many of the fans by surprise. Lewis and Lima won game one, 21-18. Davis and Johnson Jordan did not seem fazed, however, and stormed back to take game two, 21-17. The last game, however, was all about the alliterative pair. Lewis and Lima notched a convincing 15-10 victory to continue on to the winner's bracket.
This is the second consecutive week in the contenders' bracket for the Johnson Jordan and Davis. Last week, eventual second-place finishers Jennifer Boss and April Ross bumped them onto the right side of the bracket board. Johnson Jordan and Davis took home a seventh-place finish in Miami.
They play Saturday at 10 a.m. CT against No. 11 Suzanne Stonebarger and Michelle More.
The Lewis-Lima streak didn't stop there. Lewis and Lima swept No. 6 Holly McPeak and Logan Tom in two games, 21-18, 21-19.
The Lewis and Lima victory guarantees the women at least a fifth-place finish, which, thus far, is the highest for both of them. Lima has scored a ninth five times, while Lewis has seen that finish four times.
Mixed success for the Texans:
Carrie Dodd, a University of Texas alum, is the highest women's seed in Dallas with a Texan connection. The No. 7 pair of Dodd and Tatiana Minello played a 12:30 match against Jennifer Fopma and Stacy Rouwenhorst. Although the match went to three games, Dodd and Minello played convincingly in the games they took (21-12, 19-21, 15-6).
Dodd and Minello, who are playing together for the first time, ran into a road block in their attempt to earn Dodd some Longhorn success, when they faced last week's champs, Youngs and Branagh. The Miami Open winners were too much for Dodd and Minello. EY and Branagh won in two, 21-17, 21-13.
The aforementioned Ivy and Lowe had the same mixed results. Ivy and Lowe hit their stride in their upset victory over Angie Akers and Brooke Hanson, but their good fortune for the day stopped there. In the second round, Ivy and Lowe ran into the Tyra and Rachel show, the No. 5 combination of Tyra Turner and Rachel Wacholder. Turner and Wacholder won both games 21-18.
Ivy and Lowe rebounded and won their contenders' bracket game against No. 22 Claire Robertson and Julie Romais, 21-18, 16-21, 18-16. Ivy and Lowe will play No. 13 Diane Pascua and Heidi Ilustre on Saturday morning at 10 a.m. CT.
Ivy won't be the only time that Pascua and Ilustre will have messed with Texas this weekend. Their opening match came against Keao Burdine and Jaimie Lee, who, like Ivy, resides in Austin. Lee and Burdine, who only practiced once as partners before their first match, fell hard in their first set, 21-9. In game two, however, the pair clearly regained their footing. It was clear that they were learning each other more as the game went on. The pair improved but still fell 22-20 to Ilustre and Pascua.
Lee and Burdine dropped their next match in the contender's bracket to Johnson Jordan and Davis,(34-32, 21-12).
No matter the outcome, Lee was happy to see the AVP in Texas.
"I'm excited for the tour to be here. I'll be even more excited when it comes to Austin," Lee said.

Shocking exit of Metzger, Lambert
No. 1 men's team ousted after just two matches
By Robert Falkoff / AVP.com
ARLINGTON, Texas -- So much for the No. 1 seed on the men's side.
Mike Lambert and Stein Metzger went in with a lot of hoopla but had what amounted to a bad day at the office and were ousted from the Dallas Open on Friday with a contender's bracket loss to Brent Doble and Ty Loomis.
Lambert and Metzger went down, 21-18, 21-10, after earlier falling in the winner's bracket to Albert Hannemann and Ed Ratledge, 21-14, 17-21, 15-11.
"We just weren't on our game all day," Metzger said. "We just kept trying to push and push, but neither one of us felt real good today."
Metzger said it was a combination of the No. 1 seed running into two teams that played well while the Metzger-Lambert unit was in a sluggish mode.
"With both teams that we played against, you have to hand it to them," Metzger said. "They took advantage and served well. They put us in some bad situations. When it came down to the end, both teams made a couple of real good plays and finished tough."
The upset of Metzger-Lambert illustrated the competitiveness on the men's tour the last several years.
"You really can't have any letdowns," Metzger said. "You can't just walk out there and expect to win."
The Metzger-Lambert unit had lost to Phil Dalhausser and Todd Rogers in the semifinals of the Miami Open. Metzger and Lambert hope to rebound and capture their first title of the season next week in Huntington Beach.
"You try to fight through it mentally to get yourself going, because physically you don't feel quite right," Metzger said. "We travel all the time. Sometimes, you don't sleep well or get the food you are used to having. Today was one of those days when we couldn't get anything rolling."
Hannemann and Ratledge used the victory over Metzger/Lambert as a springboard to a big day, which boosted them into Saturday's semifinals. Hannemann and Ratledge broke away from Matt Olson and Jason Ring in the middle of the third game to win, 21-14, 17-21, 15-11, and advance to Saturday's action.
"We got Matt in some trouble," Hannemann said. "When he would swing, Ed would block him and when he would shoot, I would dig him. He got in a bad rhythm there, so we figured, just stay after him."
Hannemann and Ratledge will match up against Sean Scott and Matt Fuerbringer in the semifinals. Scott and Fuerbringer advanced through the winner's bracket to claim their semifinal spot.
"Sean Scott is one of my ex-partners," Hannemann said. "I know him very well. I think we have a very good chance to win. It's the first time Sean has played defense and the first time he has played the right side. So, they have a lot to work out. They'll be as fired up as we are."
Local favorite Austin Rester and partner Aaron Wachtfogel were sent to the contender's bracket by Jake Gibb and Sean Rosenthal and left the tournament after falling to Adam Jewell and Jose Loiola. Rester, an alumnus of Texas Tech who grew up in a Dallas suburb, had a big show of support in the early matches.
It was business as usual for Rogers and Dalhausser as they attempt to win their fourth consecutive title, dating back to last year. By breezing into the semifinals, Rogers and Dalhausser appeared poised to add another championship to their resume. Rogers and Dalhausser got past Fred Souza and Anthony Medel in the quarterfinals.
"We're playing all right," Dalhausser said. "I felt like I played terrible in the last match, but we pulled it out."
Dalhausser expressed surprise at the early ouster of Metzger and Lambert.
"That's mind-boggling," he said. "Something isn't right with them. They are too good of a team to be going uno, dos."
Karch Kiraly's second event in his farewell season ended after a long and spirited battle back through the contender's bracket. Kiraly and Kevin Wong were ever so close to moving on to Saturday play, but fell 16-14 to Hans Stolfus and Scott Wong in the decisive third game.
At 46, Kiraly wouldn't recommend the long route that he and his partner took before an appreciative and supportive in crowd in Texas. Over the next couple of days, he expects to feel the aches and pains of playing so many matches on a non-beach surface. But the effort nearly paid off.
"We were right in it," Kiraly said. "We lost a couple of close ones today. It's always frustrating when that happens. We got to match point in that last one, but those guys made a couple of good plays."
Other teams remaining in contention for the title include Gibb and Rosenthal; Casey Jennings and Mark Williams; Will Strickland and Nick Lucena; Doble and Loomis and Larry Witt and Ryan Mariano.

Men's final to cap Saturday
Can anyone knock of Rogers and Dalhausser?
By Monique Moyal / AVP.com
With the first day of main draw action in the books, the men are ready to pair their eight to one on Saturday. The women's draw will be filled with Contender's Bracket matches in anticipation of their final on Sunday.
The biggest match of the day will undoubtedly be the men's final, which will be televised Fox Sports Net at 4:00. The biggest surprise of the day is the team that definitely won't be there. No. 1 seed Stein Metzger and Mike Lambert got bumped from competition in two consecutive losses. First, the Crocs Cup champions fell to No. 17 Albert Hannemann and Ed Ratledge (15-21, 21-19, 15-12) and then lost to Ty Loomis and Brent Doble in the Contender's Bracket (21-10, 21-18).
Although watching the Hawaiian powerhouses of Metzger and Lambert won't be an option, a must-see on Saturday is the rematch of last week's men's final, No. 3 Jake Gibb/Sean Rosenthal against No. 2 Phil Dalhausser/Todd Rogers. In the two matches in Miami, Dalhausser and Rogers swept Gibb and Rosie in all four games. If Gibb and Rosenthal have devised a way to stop "The Professor" and "The Thin Beast," they will be sure to show it on Saturday morning to solidify a spot in the Final Four.
On the other side of the winner's bracket semis, Hannemann and Ratledge take on Matt Fuerbringer and Sean Scott. Fuerbringer and Scott took a quick trip to the contenders' bracket last week and are looking to avenge that with a high finish in Dallas. Hannemann and Ratledge, who had to qualify in Miami, are looking to solidify their spot in the main draw.
Hans Stolfus and Scott Wong found themselves on the happier side of two upsets on Friday in order to earn their way into Saturday play. No. 12 Stolfus/Wong defeated No. 5 Dax Holdren/Jeff Nygaard, who have yet to win their first game of a tournament in 2007, in three games (22-20, 24-26, 15-12). Although Matt Fuerbringer and Sean Scott kicked Wong and Stolfus into the contenders' bracket in the next round, the new partners were able to bounce back.
Stolfus and Wong then had to square off against an interesting tenth-seed. Not only did Stolfus and Wong's opposing team feature the winningest player of all time, Karch Kiraly, it also featured Scott's older brother, Kevin. After losing the first game, 18-21, Stolfus and Wong battled back, winning the second 21-19 and withstanding a late rally by Kiraly and the elder Wong to win the third, 16-14. Wong and Stolfus will play Saturday at 10 am CDT.
Women:
Of the 12 women's games on Saturday, 10 will be played in the Contender's Bracket. With the set-up of the brackets, four women's teams await the winners of the first four women's matches of the day.
For instance, if Annett Davis and Jenny Johnson Jordan can defeat Michelle More and Suzanne Stonebarger in the Saturday's opening round of contenders' games, the UCLA grads set up a rematch against the USC alums, April Ross and Jennifer Boss, who sent Johnson Jordan and Davis into the Contender's Bracket last week.
Another potential rivalry match is Carrie Dodd, a University of Texas alum, and Tatiana Minello, against Ashley Ivy, Arlington native, and Heather Lowe. If Ivy and Lowe can pull out a win against Diane Ilustre and Heidi Pascua, Ivy and Dodd might get to lock Longhorns.
In the winner's bracket, No. 14 Angela Lewis and Priscilla Lima will try to continue their run of upsets against last week's champs, No. 2 Elaine Youngs and Nicole Branagh, while No. 1 Misty May-Treanor and Kerri Walsh will play No. 4 Dianne DeNecochea and Barbra Fontana.

Tournament Capsule: Friday
By Robert Falkoff / AVP.com
Saturday figures to be another exciting day as the Dallas Open moves closer to crowning its champions.
On the men's side, the No. 1 seeded Mike Lambert and Stein Metzger are out. But the No. 2, No. 3 and No. 4 seeds all played to form.
At No. 2, Phil Dalhausser and Todd Rogers looked like they are on a mission to keep their three-tournament winning streak (dating back to last year) alive. The No. 3 seeded Jake Gibb-Sean Rosenthal team and the No. 4-seeded Matt Fuerbringer-Sean Scott team will have something to say about that.
Five teams which were seeded below No. 10 are still in the running. The list includes Ryan Mariano and Larry Witt (11); Hans Stolfus and Scott Wong (12); Nick Lucena and Will Strickland (13), Brent Doble and Ty Loomis (15) and Albert Hannemann and Ed Ratledge (17).
The big upsets on Friday had Hannemann-Ratledge and Doble-Loomis scoring victories over Lambert-Metzger to knock the No. 1 seed out of the tournament.
In women's play, top seed Kerri Walsh and Misty May-Treanor and No. 2 seed Elaine Youngs and Nicole Branagh could be on a collision course. Neither unit faltered on Friday.
Youngs and Branagh are looking to keep it going after winning the Miami Open last week. Walsh and May-Treanor are motivated to atone for last week's ouster in the semifinals.
The men's championship will be decided Saturday at 4:30 CT and the women's title will be played on Sunday.

Locals move on in Dallas
VOLLEYBALL: Gibb and Fuerbringer advance in men's winner's bracket, as does May-Treanor in AVP Dallas Open Friday.
DALLAS — Newport Harbor High product Misty May-Treanor and partner Kerri Walsh have advanced to the winner's bracket fourth round of the Assn. of Volleyball Professionals Cuervo Gold Crown Dallas Open.
On the men's side, Costa Mesa resident Jake Gibb and Estancia High graduate Matt Fuerbringer also advanced to the winner's bracket fourth round Friday.
No. 1-seeded May-Treanor and Walsh, who fell in the semifinals last weekend at the Miami Open, defeated No. 8-seeded April Ross — another Sailors alumna — and partner Jennifer Boss, 21-18, 21-16, in the third round. May-Treanor and Walsh, the four-time defending AVP Team of the Year, advance to play No. 4 Dianne DeNecochea and Barbra Fontana with a semifinal spot on the line.
Ross and Boss, who advanced to the championship match in Miami, will play a contender's bracket match against either No. 3-seeded Annett Davis and Jenny Johnson-Jordan or No. 11 Michelle More and Suzanne Stonebarger.
Gibb, the No. 3 seed with partner Sean Rosenthal, advanced on Friday with a 21-18, 23-21 win over No. 11-seeded Ryan Mariano and Larry Witt. Gibb and Rosenthal, who finished second in Miami, will play No. 2 Phil Dalhausser and Todd Rogers today, with the winner to the semifinals.
Fuerbringer and Sean Scott, the No. 4 seed, face No. 17 Albert Hannemann and Ed Ratledge today. That team upset No. 1-seeded Costa Mesa resident Mike Lambert and partner Stein Metzger, 15-21, 21-19, 15-12, in their very first winner's bracket match.
Lambert and Metzger, who had advanced to the Miami semifinals, also lost their first contender's bracket match in Dallas to No. 15-seeded Newport Beach resident Ty Loomis and Brent Doble, 21-10, 21-18. They finish tied for 17th and split $800.
Loomis and Doble are still alive in the contender's bracket and play Mariano and Witt.
Newport Harbor High product Ty Tramblie and partner Mike Morrison also finished tied for 17th after losing a contender's bracket match to No. 6-seeded Casey Jennings and Mark Williams, 20-22, 21-14, 15-7. They also split $800.
Gibb's wife, Jane, and her partner Kirstin Olsen finished tied for 37th after falling in a qualifier's bracket match to Nicki Fusco and Gina Kirstein, 21-11, 21-15.
Former UC Irvine volleyball players Kelly Wing, who was an All-American, and Whitney Pavlik also finished tied for 37th after losing in the qualifier's bracket to Iwona Lodzik and Kristin Ursillo, 21-12, 21-17.
The men's tournament concludes today, with the women's final scheduled for Sunday.

Fan favorite Hannemann is back
Credits hiring a nutritionist and dedicated teammate
By Monique Moyal / AVP.com
After fighting through the qualifiers in the Cuervo Gold Crown Miami Open last weekend, No. 17 Albert Hannemann and his partner Ed Ratledge have come a long way.
They had something to prove and their fifth place result this weekend ties Ratledge's best finish which came back in Tempe, Ariz., nearly one year ago with Ty Loomis.
"We just took [the qualifying seed in Miami] to heart and wanted to make sure that it was clear that we'll never do that again," said Hannemann. "So you know, we had a lot of fire last week, but we ran out of gas. And then this week, we were fresh and we've been playing with a little chip on our shoulders."
Quite possibly the biggest opportunity for the 17th-seeded team came when they were still in the Winner's Bracket and challenging third-ranked Jake Gibb and Sean Rosenthal for a spot in the semi-finals.
Things began smoothly with a fairly quick 21-19 first set finish against last weekend's second-place team, but the pace slowly changed in the second set. The scores knotted all the way through the set, until 19-19 when Rosenthal/Gibb were able to sneak in two more points and tie the match with a second score of 21-19.
Hannemann/Ratledge trailed for much of the game, until a mid-set tie. With the score at 12-12 and a trip to the semis within reach, Gibb and Rosenthal were able to capitalize on their match point opportunity, whereas Hannemann and Ratledge missed three chances to do so and fell into the Contender's Bracket 15-17.
"We just need to keep playing the same way and we need to finish [future teams] off," said Hannemann. "We just gave Sean and Fuerby a big gift there and we played really aggressive at the end, so we learned our lesson. And now we're gonna keep learning from our lessons."
The pair was unable to find the same success and aggression in their first attempt from the Contender's Bracket, when they fell to only the second higher ranked team of the weekend, 21-12 and 21-14 to No. 11 Ryan Mariano and Larry Witt.
This weekend's road to the semifinals regains some old ground for Hannemann, who has not come this close since partnering with Jeff Nygaard in 2002. That was also the year the pair won an AVP Open title in Hermosa Beach against Stein Metzger and Kevin Wong.
Part of the reason for Hannemann's return to a winning groove is his established partnership with Ratledge throughout the entire 2007 season. Last year Al-B paired with Scott Wong, Aaron Boss, Jeff Carlucci, Mark Williams and Scott Lane to name a few. The best finish he and any of his partners could muster were two ninth-place finishes.
Also, 2007 marks the first year Hannemann, 36, signed on a nutritionist to help better his diet and overall health.
"I've got a good partner that's committed to the year; I haven't had a partner that was ready to commit for the year for three or four years," said Hannemann. "I've just been hungry and I'm healthy and I get a lot of energy from the crowd."
Among the many to welcome Hannemann's return to the top, were the Dallas fans themselves. Although both men hail from Southern California, Hannemann and Ratledge had one of the largest followings on tour.
"I think they've been waiting for me to come back into the top groups and I think it's fun to play for them," said Hannemann. "I'm a pretty emotional player so I think that they feed off of my emotion too."
Part of that, Hannemann attributes to the number of friends he has accumulated in his 15 years of play. He said he has an advantage because instead of living in and out of hotels like many players on the AVP Crocs Tour, he can live like he does at home with local friends.
"I'm eating good and they're taking care of me," said Hannemann. "So it's better than hotels. I love that and I try to do that when I'm on the road. Every stop I have a house and that's usually where I stay, it just feels more like at home."
Part of his routine on the road includes nightly protein shakes and movie rentals, while in the morning he says thank you to his host families with breakfast.
And Hannemann has one idea as to why he fell into the Contender's Bracket before making it to the semifinals this weekend.
"But, I don't know, maybe my eggs weren't so good today," he said.
Runny eggs or not, Hannemann is back. And his fans agree, as he still received a standing ovation at the end of his match despite his loss.

Dodd alive, top two move through
Carrie Dodd is taking advantage of rare chance
By Colleen Murray / AVP.com
There are few women competing on Sunday to whom this weekend means more than Carrie Dodd. After being bumped into the Contender's Bracket on Friday by No. 2 Nicole Branagh and Elaine Youngs, the University of Texas graduate, with partner Tatiana Minello, battled her way through that bracket on Saturday to earn the chance to play another day. Playing in the Lone Star State couldn't mean more to her.
"It's heaven. I get so jealous when California people have all their families there. I only get that in Dallas," Dodd said.
Although she hails from Wisconsin, the Longhorn has a sister who leaves near Dallas and made the trip to root for Dodd, even bringing Dodd's nearly 2-year-old nephew. Dodd used the energy she got from her family and the chemistry she's found with her new partnership with Minello to push through their two matches in the Contender's Bracket.
After defeating No. 13 Diane Ilustre and Heidi Pascua in the 9th-place matchup (17-21, 21-17, 15-11), Dodd and Minello moved on to play the No. 6 combination of indoor Olympian Logan Tom and beach Olympian Holly McPeak. Minello and Dodd refused to be intimidated by the competition. The 7th seed fired on all cylinders, taking the first set by the biggest margin of the main draw, 21-8.
"I think we served well. We knew that if we were on the bad side, we had to have good ball control," Dodd said.
Dodd and Minello continued their dominance, in a closer second game but one with the same outcome: a victory, 21-14, for Dodd and Minello. Dodd has been awed by her new partnership with Tati.
"We've only been playing together for two weeks. She's such an easy person to play with," Dodd said. "She teaches me things. I'm lucky."
Dodd hopes her luck continues on Sunday morning when she and Tati take on No. 4 Dianne DeNecochea and Barbra Fontana. If Dodd and Minello can pull off a win, it would follow along the same lines as the string of upsets from Saturday.
Upsets:
While underdog wins for the women were few and far between on Friday, the men must have rubbed off on their female counterparts before Saturday's games. For starters, no. 15 Lauren Fendrick and Brittany Hochevar sent No. 10 Jennifer Fopma and Stacey Rouwenhorst home in three games (15-21, 21-16, 15-8), in one of the first games of the day on Saturday.
At about the same time, No. 16 Alicia Polzin and Paula Roca started off struggling against No. 10 Jenny Pavley and Sarah Straton. However, Roca and Polzin battled back against Straton and Pavley, Roca's former partner, to pull off the come-from-behind, upset victory, 21-16, 21-19.
Neither team could continue its improbable run, and both took ninth place. Fendrick/Hochevar lost to No. 5 Tyra Turner/Rachel Wacholder and Polzin/Roca dropped its last game to McPeak/Tom.
The next round also offered a lower-seed win. Although No. 8 Jennifer Boss and April Ross dropped their first game, 14-21, against No. 3 Jenny Johnson Jordan and Annett Davis, last week's runner-up was determined to keep the Saturday upsets going. Boss and Ross won the next in overtime, 24-22, and the third, 15-10. Boss and Ross's run ended there, as they lost in the seventh place game to Rachel Wacholder and Tyra Turner.
Texas heartbreak:
Ashley Ivy and Heather Lowe looked poised to be another one of the many upsets on the day. They came out swinging, winning their first game, 21-17, amid screaming fans of Ivy, an Arlington. But Diane Pascua and Heidi Ilustre noted their mistakes in the first game -- namely, ball control -- and quickly fixed them. Pascua and Ilustre entered the second game just as fired up as their opponents, despite Ivy's big following.
"We had to cheer ourselves on," Pascua said.
They cheered themselves on to a 21-17 victory to force a third game. The final set was all Ilustre and Pascua. They didn't let the hometown fans, or Lowe and Ivy's own enthusiasm, faze them on their way to a 15-11 victory.
"Both of them are big, fired-up girls, so we just had to be our own fans," said Ilustre.
Ilustre/Pascua's fan power wasn't enough to overcome Texas alum Dodd and Minello in the next round and the No. 13 seed went home with a ninth-place finish.
The big dogs move on:
Since the winner's bracket stayed busy yesterday, Saturday was much more relaxed for the top-seeds. Misty May-Treanor and Kerri Walsh played only once, a 2:50 p.m. match-up against No. 4 DeNecochea and Fontana. The top-seed continued their unbeaten streak and took the match in two games, 21-16, 21-18.
Branagh/Youngs only played once, as well. At noon, they took on the streaking 14th seed, Lewis and Lima. The Miami Open champions took the first game (21-13) but lost their first game of the tournament to the 14th-seeders, 19-21. Branagh and Youngs recovered, however, and squeaked out a 15-12 win.
Now there are six teams left for the women, and they will all be hungry for a championship appearance. Play for the women's side begins tomorrow morning at 8:30 a.m.
 
Beastly Dalhausser takes another
Rogers, Dalhausser count four straight titles
By Robert Falkoff / AVP.com
ARLINGTON, Texas -- The Todd Rogers-Phil Dalhausser victory tour continues to relentlessly march westward across America.
Miami last week. Dallas this week. It begs the question whether anybody can take down Rogers and Dalhausser when the AVP Tour rolls into Huntington Beach the weekend of May 3-6.
Saving their best for last, Rogers and Dalhausser never trailed against Sean Rosenthal and Jake Gibb in the championship match of the Dallas Open, dispatching the No. 3 seed, 21-14, 21-16, to make it 2-for-2 on the AVP Tour this season. Rogers and Dalhausser have won four consecutive team events overall dating back to last year and 17 straight matches.
"I was seeing everything really well, and Phil was blocking everything really well," Rogers said.
The result was double-barreled excellence.
It was 10-10 in the first game when Rogers and Dalhausser rang up three straight points, including a couple of Dalhausser aces. They held Rosenthal and Gibb at arm's length the rest of the way, and Dalhausser ended Game 1 with an exclamation point by soaring for one of his eight blocks.
"Rosy started the game off almost unstoppable, so we had to go to Jake and see what he had," Dalhausser said.
Rogers and Dalhausser then jumped out 3-0 in Game 2. The third point was a Rogers serve directly between Rosenthal and Gibb and neither man went for it. Rosenthal and Gibb got as close as 11-10 and trailed 15-13 when Dalhausser and Rogers rang up four straight and cruised the rest of the way.
After winning eight tournament events last year, Rogers had warned before the season about setting the bar too high. But now that the Rogers-Dalhausser team has jumped out 2-for-2, it looks like the unit has a great chance to better last year's victory total.
"We did goals together and we tier them to three levels," Rogers said. "Level 3 is to utterly dominate. We're well on our way toward Level 3 right now, but we've got a long way to go to get there."
Added Dalhausser, "It's too early to talk about domination. If you look ahead, you're thinking about what's in the future, instead of what's right in front of you."
Earlier in the day, Dalhausser and Rogers had been pushed to three games by Rosenthal and Gibb en route to a championship showdown. But when the television spotlight came on for the championship match, Dalhausser and Rogers made sure that spotlight belonged to them. The winners split $20,000 while the losers split $15,000.
It was the same song, second verse, after Dalhausser and Rogers beat Rosenthal and Gibb in the championship match last week in Miami.
"I think they just played better, game after game and match after match," Rosenthal said. "We have to figure out a way to beat them. It's more than a monkey on our back. It's something a lot bigger than that.
"It's very frustrating, because we're undefeated against the AVP, except for them."
Dalhausser and Rogers have a career record of 10-1 in championship matches on the AVP. They are 13-2 against Gibb and Rosenthal.
It marked the fifth time in the last six AVP team events that the championship match was a sweep.
Dalhausser drew most of the oohs and aahs from the crowd in the championship match. He had 12 kills, four digs and two aces to go with the eight blocks. The 6-foot-10 "Thin Beast" can give any opponent nightmares.
"He's like Kerri (Walsh) is on the women's tour right now," Rosenthal said. "He's so big and really good."
Rosenthal and Gibb vow to keep searching for ways to get past their championship match nemesis.
"We have to figure something out," Rosenthal said.
Dalhausser and Rogers just want to keep the momentum going in Huntington Beach on the first weekend of May. Three wins in three tries in three different time zones sounds like a plan for the hottest men's team on tour.

Kiraly enjoying his last ride
Cites chemistry with Wong helping duo prep
By Robert Falkoff / AVP.com
ARLINGTON, Texas -- He's gone from the Dallas Open but not forgotten. Karch Kiraly didn't quite make it to the final day of competition in Texas, but now it's back to California, where Kiraly and partner Kevin Wong will have the opportunity to play on a natural beach surface at Huntington Beach on the weekend of May 3-6.
"I'm having a great time playing with Kevin," said the 46-year-old Kiraly, who is in his farewell season on the AVP Tour. "He and I fit really well together. We have some nice chemistry. He's a great volleyball player, a great blocker and setter. We complement each other well, so I'm looking forward to having some strong tournaments."
Kiraly was happy that he had one last opportunity to visit Dallas on the Tour.
"We used to come here quite often," Kiraly said. "There were a lot of good volleyball fans out here."
While working his way through the contender's bracket on Friday, Kiraly took a pounding on the artificial courts.
"I'm looking forward to getting back to the beach," Kiraly said.
Key to the city: Kiraly was saluted on Saturday as Arlington Mayor Robert Cluck presented Kiraly with a key to the city.
"We're pleased to have you here," Cluck said. "I'm standing next to a legend."
Kiraly addressed the crowd at the main stadium after jokingly asking Cluck about the privileges that the key to the city might offer.
"Does this mean I can get in a Cowboys game?" Kiraly wondered.
The Dallas Cowboys are building a new stadium in Arlington a short distance from where the Dallas Open is being held.
Cluck assured Kiraly after the ceremony that he's welcome to take in a Cowboys game when the new stadium in Arlington is completed.
AVP in Dallas: This week's tournament marks the 10th time the AVP has scheduled a men's event in Dallas and the second time for women.
The 1996 tournament had to be cancelled because of high winds. It was one of just four events in which the competition was not completed. The others were Pensacola in 1992 and 1993 and Indianapolis in 1997.
The previous eight Dallas events played to conclusion had eight different partners emerge as winners. Kiraly was in on three of those victories. The last Dallas men's champs prior to Saturday were Adam Johnson and Kiraly in 1999.
Nancy Reno and Angela Rock won the only other Dallas women's event in 1994.
Odds and ends: The Dallas Open marks the 450th men's event in AVP history. ... Celebrating birthdays during the Dallas Open are Andy Shean and Federica Tonon. Shean turned 30 on Thursday and Tonon turns 29 on Sunday. ... Matt Fuerbringer (6-7) and Sean Scott (6-5) were bidding to become the second-tallest team to win. The tallest unit was Adam Jewell (6-6) and Jake Gibb (6-7). Canyon Ceman (6-5) and Mike Whitemarish (6-7) equaled the combined height of Fuerbringer and Scott.

Tournament Capsule: Saturday
Can Youngs and Branagh duplicate top men?
By Robert Falkoff / AVP.com
ARLINGTON, Texas -- Todd Rogers and Phil Dalhausser lived up to their end of the bargain. Now it's up to Elaine Youngs and Nicole Branagh to see if they can go 2-for-2
on the 2007 AVP Crocs Tour.
Rogers and Dalhausser wrapped up their second title in two weeks on Saturday and Youngs and Branagh will try to equal that feat on Sunday as the Dallas Open crowns its women's champion. But lurking in their path are top seeded Misty May-Treanor and Kerri Walsh, who want to atone for a semifinal ouster last week in Miami.
The May-Treanor/Walsh and Youngs/Branagh units rolled through the winner's bracket on Saturday. Others with an opportunity on Sunday are No. 4 Dianne DeNecochea/Barbra Fontana, No. 5 Tyra Turner/Rachel Wacholder, No. 7 Carrie Dodd/Tatiana Minello and No. 14 Angela Lewis/Priscilla Lima.
The women's final is scheduled to begin around 1:30 ET.

Gibb takes second again in AVP tourney
VOLLEYBALL: Costa Mesa resident and teammate Rosenthal can't stop top seed, while May-Treanor moves on.
ARLINGTON, Texas — Costa Mesa resident Jake Gibb and his teammate Sean Rosenthal had to settle for runner-up status once again going up against the red-hot team of Todd Rogers and Phil Dalhausser at the Assn. of Volleyball Professionals Cuervo Gold Crown Dallas Open Saturday.
Rogers and Dalhausser, the No. 2 seed, won the Miami Open last week and this week they collected the Dallas Open crown after a 21-14, 21-16 win Saturday over the third-seeded Gibb and Rosenthal.
Earlier in the day, Gibb and Rosenthal nearly defeated Rogers and Dalhausser, but lost, 24-26, 21-12, 15-13, in the fourth round of the winner's bracket.
Gibb and Rosenthal split $15,000 for finishing in second place. The winners took home $20,000.
Rogers and Dalhausser never trailed in the championship match. It was 10-10 in the first game when Rogers and Dalhausser scored three straight points to regain command.
Rogers and Dalhausser have four consecutive team events overall dating back to last year. They have a 17-match winning streak and they are 13-2 against Gibb and Rosenthal.
Estancia High product Matt Fuerbringer and his partner Sean Scott, the No. 4 seed, finished tied for third. The duo split $9,500
Gibb's team defeated Fuerbringer's in a tight semifinal, 14-21, 23-21, 15-12.
The Dallas Open's top seed, Costa Mesa resident Mike Lambert and teammate Stein Metzger, lost in their first winner's bracket match on Friday, 15-21, 21-10, 15-12.
On the women's side, Misty May-Treanor, a Newport Harbor High product, played just one match Saturday.
May-Treanor and Kerri Walsh, the top seed, defeated No. 4-seeded Dianne DeNecochea and Barbra Fontana, 21-16, 21-18.
May-Treanor and Walsh, the four-time defending AVP Team of the Year, will face Nicole Branagh and Elaine Youngs, the No. 2 seed in a semifinal today.
April Ross, also a Newport Harbor product, nearly got out of the contender's bracket with her teammate Jennifer Boss. The No. 8-seeded team, which finished second at the Miami Open last week, upset third-seeded Annett Davis and Jenny Johnson Jordan, 14-21, 34-22, 15-10 in the third round of the contender's bracket. But, Ross and Boss the lost to fifth-seeded Tyra Turner and Rachel Wacholder, 21-18, 21-19.
Ross and Boss finished tied for seventh and split $4,650.
Ross, along with the rest of the volleyball players from the Newport-Mesa area, will return close to home May 3-6, when the AVP Tour comes to Huntington Beach.

Lewis and Lima make Cinderella run
Duo's fifth place finish is one of weekend's surprises
By Monique Moyal / AVP.com
For many of the men's teams, the 2007 AVP Cuervo Gold Crown Dallas Open turned out to be a surreal run to the top.
One women's team, No. 14 Angela Lewis and Priscilla Lima, shared those same feelings as the lowest seeded pair to enter the quarterfinals.
The duo was one of the major surprises this weekend and a team to look out for in the future, and amazingly enough, did not practice together in the off-season.
"Believe it or not, we never practiced together," said Lima. "We wished we could, but actually I didn't play with her in the last five tournaments last year, so we haven't played together since maybe October - and I haven't seen her since the last AVP [tournament] last year."
Lima took a break from her partnership with Lewis after Birmingham last year and teamed up with Paula Roca. The best the new pair finished in 2006 was in ninth place - tying her best finish with Lewis.
This weekend however, something clicked, as Lewis and Lima put together their best tournament yet - a fifth-place finish that almost became a bid to the semifinals when they lost to No. 5 Tyra Turner and Rachel Wacholder.
The first set was fairly uneventful, as the two teams exchanged points until a tie at 15-15. From there, Turner/Wacholder maintained the small margin necessary to win 21-18.
The second set nearly resembled the first, complete with 10 knotted scores. Again, at 15-15, the teams locked scores two more times until Lewis and Lima pulled in front 21-19.
And to no surprise, the third set kept pace with the first two. Wacholder and Turner were at match point two times, 14-12 and 14-13, but Lima and Lewis were not ready to go home. Not until 15-13, did Turner and Wacholder secure their move into the semifinals, where they fell to No. 1 Misty May-Treanor and Kerri Walsh.
"Every time we get in, we just say we have nothing to lose," said Lima. "We have all those big players with big names and experience and I'm like, 'Angela, we just gotta keep having fun and let's play our little game and make everybody frustrated.'"
One key to Lima and Lewis's strength as a partnership is the long-lasting friendship the two have developed over the past two years. An integral part of their work-outs and preparation is staying loose and having a good time together.
Lima said that they have to dance in the parking lot before every match to pump themselves up.
"The best thing is Angela is one of my best friends, on and off the court. And we're so much alike, we love to dance, we love to talk, we love to laugh, and we love to play volleyball," said Lima. "So we actually have fun. Why (are) you gonna be all serious if you're doing something that you love? You don't have to be all stressed about it."
"We try to listen to some booty music and we start moving around and then we mix up our sports drinks and do a regular warm up, but we make sure we do a little shaky before that," she continued, with a chuckle.
But there is a serious side to Priscilla Lima, the player and the person. Not only is the 27-year-old trying to make it as an international player, but the Rio de Janeiro native is also taking a lot on her plate as a full-time college student.
After finishing her first undergraduate degree as general studies major and four year student athlete at Louisiana-Lafayette, she is back for a second bachelor's, taking 15 units while traveling on the AVP Crocs Tour.
"I like education, I really do, and I like learning; it's only helping my performance, my game and knowledge within the sport," said Lima. "That's why I wanna finish Kinesiology and maybe later on, then I'll take my time doing my master's but I just wanted to finish real quick."
As an international student, there are considerable tuition bills to pay for a second undergrad career.
But Lima has it all figured out.
"I actually play professional beach volleyball to pay for school; as an international student I pay $10,000 a year and my family doesn't have a lot of money to help," said Lima. "So my way of helping is by paying my own bills and not asking them for money, so my check is actually going to my tuition right now."
At least if the whole school thing doesn't work out, Lima has quite the promising career as a professional beach volleyball player. Others agree, as opponents and fans alike congratulated her on a phenomenal tournament this weekend.

Tran and Cox are Ultimate winners
Duo wins trip to Las Vegas
By Monique Moyal / AVP.com
ARLINGTON, Texas - If what happens in Vegas stays in Vegas, what happens in Dallas certainly is on display for all to see.
Following the success of last weekend's inaugural competition, AVP sponsor Jose Cuervo continued the second leg of its search for the Ultimate Beach Girl and Guy.
With eight candidates, three men and five women, neck-and-neck in the runnings, Dallas beach volleyball fans texted their vote for who will represent the city in Las Vegas when the AVP Crocs Tour travels to Sin City on Sept. 6-8.
Some of the more tasteful routines in the contest, winners Ricky Tran, 30, and Courtney Cox - yes like the actress - 21, both have two things in common. First of all, they have not been to Vegas as legal adults, and secondly, they both knew how to work their love of sports to win over the crowd.
When asked what his ideal date would consist of, Tran replied, "I'd pick her up on a bird and we'd fly off and we'd have reservations at some restaurant at a beach, drink a lot of Jose Cuervo and watch a lot of volleyball."
Cox separated herself from the pack when she revealed how a guy could win her over - and guys, pick up lines do not work.
Instead, she would prefer to watch her favorite baseball team, the Boston Red Sox.
"People used to say to me, 'How are your Friends?' and it took me a couple of years to figure it out," Cox said.
By the end of the season, 34 winners will head to the AVP Las Vegas Gods & Goddesses of the Beach at Caesar's Palace.
"I hope it's going to be a good time," said Tran. "I'm just gonna go with the flow and go with the punches, so whatever happens, happens."
The stakes are the same as last weekend, as each male and female representative from all of the tour stops will compete for a spread in Maxim and Cosmo, in addition to a one year modeling contract with Vision.
Stay tuned all season long to see who will represent each city. Prepare yourself Huntington Beach, you're up next.

 AVP Tour heads to Huntington Beach
Dalhausser and Rogers is the team to beat
By Colleen Murray / AVP.com
The AVP will make its first trip to a real beach in 2006 when the tour travels to Huntington Beach. The Southern California events are notoriously more intense with most of the players hailing from the area, meaning more fans rooting for a specific player, rather than the sport in general.
Maybe the biggest fan favorite of all will be the greatest player of all time, Karch Kiraly. This will be Kiraly's last stop in Huntington Beach. Kiraly, who is retiring at the end of the 2007 season, scored the last of his 144 Open wins in Huntington. He won the big check in 2005 with Mike Lambert, who will find himself in an unusual place next week.
After Lambert and partner Stein Metzger's two-and-done showing in Dallas, the Crocs Cup champions have lost their No. 1 seeding. The Hawaii natives haven't seen anything lower than a top seed in a regular season tournament since Atlanta last year. Since becoming partners in the beginning of 2006, Lambert and Metzger have never been lower than no. 2.
The top seeds will be Dallas Open champions Phil Dalhausser and Todd Rogers, looking to win their fifth tournament in a row and establish their longest winning streak as a team. Jake Gibb and Sean Rosenthal, who have taken two straight second places to Dalhausser and Rogers, are trying to stop the streak and score their first Open win of the year. Their rivalry should intensify in California with Rosie's Raiders around. Rosenthal's cheering section should be right behind him at the first California event of the year.
Another team with the crowd behind them should be Tyra Turner and Rachel Wacholder. Turner, a Florida native, pulled off a fifth-place finish in her home state in the first Open of the year. The two made it to the Final Four last week, but fell to Walsh and May-Treanor in the semifinals. It is now Wacholder's turn for a homecoming. Wacholder, an Orange County native, will try to continue her and Turner's steady improvement and put themselves in a final.
Angela Lewis and Priscilla Lewis should take a nice jump in seeding after this week's 14th seed finished in the final four. There were only seven upsets this weekend on the women's side and Lewis and Lima orchestrated two of them.
May-Treanor and Walsh won last year's Huntington Beach Open and will be the team to beat in this year's. After losses, the women play with a vengeance. In Dallas, they didn't drop a single game. On the heels of this momentum, the gold medalists will be important to watch in Huntington Beach.

Ross' beach efforts pay off
Rookie of Year has moved up in rankings
By Colleen Murray / AVP.com
Once she had her heels dug in, April Ross had an easy decision to make this offseason. Unlike in seasons past, Ross chose to dedicate all her energy to beach volleyball and forgo playing indoor volleyball.
"It is too hard on my mind and my body. I needed a break," Ross said.
That break and her offseason training bode well for the 2006 AVP Rookie of the Year. In her first event, the 24-year-old made it to the finals with Jennifer Boss. Ross is the third-youngest woman to make it to the last game of the weekend. Ross' quick rise is a tribute to her beach commitment in the offseason, her working out the kinks and her learning from the veterans.
Ross spent her offseason training with one of the best on the beach, Nancy Mason. Mason has been in five finals and taught Ross, a University of Southern California product, the nuances of the sport that only come with time. Practices, Ross said, were more about structure. Last year, Ross and partner Keao Burdine were both fairly new to the beach. Without a coach, they didn't know what to practice or how to practice it.
"Last year, it was like, let's hit a little bit and let's pass a little bit. It didn't really translate to us getting better. And this year, we had strategy," Ross said.
With Mason, Ross learned to hit the ball in the same spot every time, for example, and the reason to practice this technique. A year ago, Ross would practice like she would practice for indoor events, but her training with Mason has taught her the beach volleyball mentality.
"I learned why you approach this way instead of that way and what the ot her team is going to think you're doing by your approach," Ross said.
Although this practice prepared Ross for the season, little could prepare her for her shock a few weeks before the season started. Mason discovered that she had an injury that would require her to sit out for a few events. Ross, left without a partner, found Jennifer Boss. Last-minute partners or not, the two have thrived. Ross has been capitalizing on all her knowledge and making it work for her and Boss.
"Everything is so much more complex than I ever thought it was. Learning to use that complexity to your advantage, that's the biggest thing," Ross said.
Boss and Ross came in Miami as an 11th seed and pulled off a string of upsets to land themselves in the final, Ross's first. In Dallas, the two jumped to the eighth seed and came off with a seventh-place finish. Both are higher than Ross ever placed last year.
In her first season, Ross and Burdine took home two ninth-place finishes, and competitors saw their potential. At the end of the season, the players voted Ross 2006 Rookie of the Year.
"It was really surprising," Ross said of the award. "There's added pressure but you'll always have that award. It's a really cool honor.
Her youth has gotten her noticed, but Ross hopes her sharp playing and smart choices keep her in the limelight and the top 10 finishes. She realizes that she has limited time to capitalize on the learning opportunities around her.
"These older women that have played for so long aren't going to be around much longer, so if I'm going to play with someone and learn from someone I have to do it now," Ross said.

Top women back where they belong
May-Treanor, Walsh gain revenge in Big D
By Robert Falkoff / AVP.com
ARLINGTON, Texas -- Misty May-Treanor and Kerri Walsh are tough enough under normal circumstances. When they're using revenge to fuel their motivation, the rest of the AVP Tour on the women's side is advised to take cover.
Stung by last week's semifinal loss in Miami, May-Treanor and Walsh blew into Texas on a mission to show they are still the standard by which to be measured on the AVP Tour.
Mission accomplished. May-Treanor and Walsh had all the answers Sunday in charging past Nicole Branagh and Elaine Youngs, 21-14, 21-19, to win the Dallas Open. Whatever Branagh and Youngs did, May-Treanor and Walsh did better. The No. 1 seed was out to show that last week was an aberration, and the championship match crowd that watched May-Treanor and Walsh play ultra-sharp volleyball will vouch for the fact that they know how to rebound with a flourish.
"I think we were a lot more patient this weekend," Walsh said. "We passed well and did all the fundamentals. Even if we got down or the other team scored a run of points, we stayed steady."
That was certainly the case in Game 2 of the championship match. After controlling Game 1 throughout and jumping ahead 16-11 in Game 2, May-Treanor and Walsh saw Branagh and Youngs ring up five in a row to tie the score. But May-Treanor scored down the line to stop the run. Leading 20-19 moments later, May-Treanor delivered a kill to seal the title.
Walsh did not feel she was on top of her game in Miami when Branagh and Youngs stole the show. But the Dallas Open had a distinctly different script.
"They were serving me (in Miami) and I know that physically I'm capable," Walsh said. "But mentally, I was a little tentative and a little insecure. When it's mental, there's no excuse for that. This weekend was a whole new story. We learned."
May-Treanor and Walsh had six aces in the championship match, while Branagh and Young, who have the two highest per-game averages for aces, had only two.
"We were aggressive and kept them on their heels," May-Treanor said.
It was a pleasant weekend in the Metroplex for May-Treanor and Walsh all the way around. They threw out the first pitch at the Texas Rangers-Oakland A's game on Friday night and then took more bows while brushing aside the AVP field on Saturday and Sunday.
May-Treanor and Walsh haven't gone consecutive tournaments on the AVP tour without a victory since 2004 when they finished third in Manhattan Beach and then second in Hermosa Beach.
When the AVP Tour resumes in Huntington Beach the weekend of May 3-6, Youngs and Branagh will switch to revenge mode, and May-Treanor and Walsh will be looking to use the Dallas Open as a springboard.
"Our team rhythm both on offense and defense was on today," Walsh said. "This game is so much about rhythm and timing. Misty played unbelievable defense."
Branagh played with a heavily taped right ankle after suffering a sprain on Saturday.
"I wasn't jumping my highest, but I was doing the best I can," she said.
With each of Sunday's championship competitors now having one victory through the opening two weeks of the Tour, Youngs thinks a special rivalry might be brewing.
"It has only been two events, but I think it's in the making," Youngs said. "It's the future of beach volleyball on the women's side. You've got four big girls, because I consider Misty to be a big girl. She can hit the ball and, at 5-10, she jumps well."
Branagh figures her ankle will be 100 percent at Huntington Beach. But the question is whether May-Treanor and Walsh can be stopped by Youngs/Branagh or anybody else now that May-Treanor and Walsh have hit their stride on the 2007 Tour.
"Now, we're on another mission," May-Treanor said. "We need to win the next one."

Notebook: Raising competition
May-Treanor one step closer to McPeak's record
By Robert Falkoff and Monique Moyal / AVP.com
ARLINGTON, Texas -- Two weeks into the 2007 AVP Crocs Tour, Misty May-Treanor can feel the competition tightening up.
"We have to be playing at our best," May-Treanor said.
May-Treanor points to the unit of Angela Lewis/Priscilla Lima as an example of a team that could be poised to burst into prominence. Lewis/Lima finished the Dallas Open in a tie for fifth place after entering as the No. 14 seed.
"This is a great event for them," May-Treanor said. "There are new teams that are up-and-coming and making great strides."
Lewis and Lima split $6,000 for their strong showing. May-Treanor and Kerri Walsh earned $20,000 and runner-up Nicole Branagh and Elaine Youngs took home $15,000.
Dianne DeNecochea and Barbra Fontana and Tyra Turner and Rachel Wacholder tied for third to earn $9,500 per team. Carrie Dodd and Tatiana Minello tied Lewis/Lima for a $6,000 share.
Closing in: With Sunday's victory, May-Treanor is just two wins shy of tying current record holder Holly McPeak, who has 72 wins.
The earliest May-Treanor could set the record now would be the weekend of May 17-20 at Hermosa Beach.
May-Treanor and partner Kerri Walsh would have to score wins at Huntington Beach and Glendale, Ariz., over the next two tournaments to set up that possibility.
Just in case: Priscilla Lima used a knee brace in the Dallas Open, but it didn't seem to hinder her mobility.
"It's preventative," Lima said. "I sprained my ankle in January, and then coming back and training, I kind of started compensating on my left leg. So I got a little fluid on my knee and a little pressure. Sometimes it feels really weak and sometimes it feels really tight."
Odds and ends: Matt Fuerbringer continued to fill the emcee role on Sunday. Fuerbringer had performed those duties on Saturday at the men's Final, along with Albert Hannemann. Regular emcee Chris McGee and Holly McPeak were involved with play-by-play for the live broadcast on AVP.com. … The Dallas Stars' ice girls showed up for the women's Final. … After being knocked out of the Contender's Bracket with a 13th-place finish on Saturday, George Roumain had to be carried off his court due to extreme dehydration.

May-Treanor collects title
ARLINGTON, Texas — Newport Harbor High product Misty May-Treanor and partner Kerri Walsh defeated Nicole Branagh and Elaine Youngs, 21-14, 21-19, in the final Sunday to win the Assn. of Volleyball Professionals Cuervo Gold Crown Dallas Open at the Ballpark in Arlington.
The win avenged a 21-19, 21-19 loss to Branagh-Youngs in the semifinals of the season-opening Miami Open last week. Branagh and Youngs went on to win that event.
May-Treanor and Walsh, who won the final seven events of the 2006 AVP season, have not gone consecutive weeks without winning an AVP tour event since 2004.
The top-seeded duo, the AVP Team of the Year the last four seasons, split the $20,000 first prize.
The tour's next event is the Huntington Beach Open, May 3-6.

Cousins stay true to roots
Two AVPers' program impacts Carson, Calif.
By Walter Villa / AVP.com
Cousins Eric Fonoimoana and Albert Hannemann have earned gold medals, but nothing gives them the sense of satisfaction they get from helping inner-city kids in low-income Carson, Calif.
In 2000, Fonoimoana got the idea to start Dig For Kids Foundation, a non-profit organization that is free to kids and stresses academics along with beach volleyball.
"I am a huge sports fan," Fonoimoana said, "and I realized that other sports leagues such as the NFL and NBA all have foundations. The AVP didn't have one, so instead of waiting, I started it myself."
Fonoimoana said that more than 1,500 kids have participated in the program since 2000.
"These are kids who have nothing," said Hannemann, who was seeded 17th and yet finished fifth with teammate Ed Ratledge this past weekend in Dallas. "We give them shoes, volleyballs and T-shirts. But more than anything, we give them a positive influence and let them know that maybe someday they can be the next Olympians."
Fonoimoana, 37, has already accomplished that goal, winning Olympic gold in 2000 along with beach volleyball partner Dain Blanton.
"When Eric won the gold medal, it really opened up a lot of doors as far as getting sponsors to help our foundation," said Hannemann, 36. "The City of Carson has supported us, and we also have sponsors such as the AVP, Michael Wigley Galleries, the Amateur Athletic Foundation, Oakley Sunglasses, Wilson Sporting Goods and Paul Mitchell Hair Salons."
Kerri Walsh, who teams with Misty May-Treanor to form the No. 1 women's beach volleyball team in the world, has also sponsored Dig For Kids. She recently donated $4,000 to start the Excellence in Volleyball and Academics scholarship fund. Every year, the fund will help four Carson High seniors pay for college.
Fonoimoana said he has also dipped into his pocket to fund Dig For Kids. But more than money, he has given his time -- about 20 hours per week during the AVP offseason -- to secure sponsorships or work with the kids.
"Over 80 percent of the players on the AVP Tour are college educated," Fonoimoana said. "I think the kids in our program should look up to us, first and foremost, because we are educated, and secondly because we are athletes. That is why I tell the kids all the time."
Hannemann said Dig For Kids has already changed how a number of kids in Carson perceive their futures.
"When we first started our program, most of the kids we talked to did not think they would ever go to college," he said. "Now when we ask that question, every single kid knows he has to go to college to better their chance in life."
Dig For Kids is designed for fourth- and fifth-graders.
"That is the ideal age for us to reach the kids, motivate them academically and teach them volleyball at the same time," Hannemann said.
Every year, Fonoimoana and Hannemann visit six elementary schools in Carson and talk to teachers and principals, who then recommend children for inclusion in the 10-week program.
"We do the program twice a year -- right after our AVP season in the fall (September through November) and before our season in the spring (February through April)," Hannemann said. "We work for them once a week for three hours each time out. The first two hours are academics, and the last hour is volleyball."
Hannemann said that high school volleyball players participate in the program as tutors and mentors.
"There are so many kids who want to do this," Hannemann said. "It's the only after-school program in the area that has been sustained for more than two years. We're really proud of it.
"I grew up poor in Los Angeles, and I hung out a lot in Carson as a teenager. I wish there had been a program like this for me," Hannemann added.
Even so, both men have prospered in the game. Fonoimoana has earned close to $1 million playing beach volleyball. Hannemann won a gold medal at the U.S. Olympic Festival and a national championship at UCLA. He was an academic All-American and has been a professional model.
Both are committed to being two of the sport's goodwill ambassadors.
"It's really the only way the sport is going to grow," Hannemann said. "After every match, win or lose, you will see Eric and I talking to kids, signing autographs."
Fonoimoana, who is retiring as a player after this season, said that taking the foundation national is the next step. But that will depend on more help from the AVP.
"We've talked, and they have been receptive," Fonoimona said. "Now it's in their court. I hope they follow through."

Smith heads clinics at AVP stops
Sinjin teaches the finer points of beach
By Monique Moyal / AVP.com
Before the legend of Karch Kiraly began in 1978, there was Sinjin Smith in 1977.
And for many volleyball fans in attendance at the AVP Crocs Tour this year, they, too, can actively take part in that legend.
Every Saturday and Sunday at 17 of the 18 AVP stops, the Crocs Court will feature clinics for adults and kids alike taught by none other than Smith, who holds 139 beach volleyball titles, second only to Kiraly's 148.
"Collectively Crocs decided that we wanted to do something interactive for the fans on site, and we thought, 'What better way than to bring out one of the best players of all-time to do clinics for kids of all ages to come out and learn from the best?'" said Tim Gray of Crocs.
The Sinjin Smith clinics began as a side note to the Croc's Tent during the 2006 tour and were such a hit, that they're back on tour for a second run.
Smith said that, depending on the turnout, each clinic is tailored to suit the skills of the participants. The majority of the girls who showed up for the Cuervo Gold Crown Dallas Open last weekend were competing in a local indoor tournament, so Smith was able to demonstrate the transition of skills from indoor to beach play.
"It depends on the group -- these girls had a background in the game, so they knew how to pass and set. So I wanted to teach them the basics of playing a two-person game," said Smith. "In other words, where they line up, where they pass the ball, where they set the ball -- basic strategies for playing the two person game. It's the same stuff that I would tell any of the pros out there."
Two local participants, Hannah Ritchie, 15, and Maria Lira, 16, of the Colleyville Heritage High School freshman red team were among the indoor volleyball players who benefited from Smith's clinics and Queen of the Court contest.
"He actually taught us how to hit and how to relax our fingers. Yeah, you can tell the difference [from what we were doing before the clinic]," Ritchie said.
Not only does Smith have an impressive beach volleyball résumé for teaching skills, but he also has extensive clinic experience. Smith and his former partner, Randy Stoklos, host a website promoting their work off the tour, Beachvolleyballcamps.com.
From June to August, Smith and Stoklos teach kids from San Diego to Oxnard, Calif., everything they need to know about beach volleyball.
"I enjoy this kind of thing. I like to teach the kids because I know that if they learn the skills at a young age and if they enjoy the game, they'll be better players when they get older," said Smith. "As a kid, they learn things so quickly that, if they enjoy the game, once they physically develop, it's much easier for them."
The advantage of attending Smith's free clinics on the AVP Crocs Tour, however, is special because many professional beach volleyball players drop in on his instruction.
"We've had Ryan Mariano stop by from time to time and has helped out, and a few of the women have also been able to come by and just kind of give some pointers here and there," said Gray.
Added Smith, "They'll put in their two cents' worth. The players are very loose and open and they'll deal with the crowd when they see things going on."
For your next chance to practice on the beach and learn from the greats, stop by the Crocs Court on Saturday or Sunday when the AVP tour rolls into Huntington Beach, Calif., next weekend.
"[Smith is] one of the best players of all time -- he has a real passion for teaching and he's really good with the kids," said Gray. "He's absolutely a pleasure to work with."

AVP reality show breeds new stars
College players break into beach game on CSTV
By Monique Moyal / AVP.com
In 2006, the AVP brought beach volleyball to top college players with the CSTV/AVP Beach Volleyball Clinic Challenge. Two of the participants, Victoria Prince and Jessica Veris, from the 2006 Clinic played in the first two qualifiers of the AVP season.
The CSTV/AVP Challenge was a reality-TV type of elimination show, where 16 of the nation's best female collegiate athletes were given a chance to try their hands at the transition from indoor to beach volleyball for three days in Manhattan Beach, Calif.
"I think [the CSTV experience] got girls interested in the sport. Three or four of the girls from that event are out here playing in the qualifier and that's really what we want," AVP veteran Holly McPeak said. "We want it to be a feeder system, and I think through that CSTV/AVP Beach Volleyball Clinic Challenge, players were able to learn the sport, be introduced to some people so they weren't total strangers and I think that really helps."
McPeak and other AVP notables helped with the training, running different clinics and workshops for the girls. Her role now with the recent college grads in the qualifiers is more of a sideline mentorship.
When the group wound down to eight girls, the players had to choose partners among those left from the original 16. Three professional coaches watched and evaluated the final teams and flew who they thought was the best to Reno for competition. From there the winning team earned a wild card draw in the qualifiers at the 2006 Huntington Beach Open.
"I watch [Veris and Prince] from the sideline and I want to see what their progress is," McPeak said. "I'll definitely tell them areas where I think that they can improve so they can get out of the qualifier and that's important. And I like to help the young players get started and get going in the right direction."
Veris, who played for the University of Washington and grew up in Manhattan Beach, and Prince, who grew up in Washington and transferred to the University of Hawaii, were given the 26th seed in the qualifier at the Miami Open and fell in two sets to No. 7 qualifier seed Suzana Manole and Lauren Mills in the first professional match of their careers.
As the duo has already learned, physical size and talent alone are not enough to make the transition from indoor to beach volleyball. This is evidenced by the longevity of careers throughout the AVP. Of the top eight seeded women's main draw teams, none are under 25. With exception of Kerry Walsh who powered through in three months, the transition to beach volleyball typically takes about three years.
"I was definitely nervous a little bit in the beginning, but it's just a game," Veris said. "It's a total lifestyle experience and totally excited for the [next AVP events] to come. It's definitely different than indoors and I love it. There's a lot more strategy and switching it up so you have to think a lot more."
Against Manole and Mills in Miami, Veris and Price showed a great deal of promise in just their first tournament. It was a fight to move on to the second round of the qualifier bracket as Manole and Mills came out on top, 21-18, 21-18.
One week later, the pair found itself with the 25th qualifying seed in Dallas but still saw the same result as the previous weekend. Veris and Prince dropped two sets to eighth-ranked Dana Schilling and Alicia Zamparelli, 21-15, 21-11.
"I think there are better things to come after this, but I got my first [AVP tournament] under my belt," Veris said. "Vic and I, I think did really well for our first time and we can only get better."
Last weekend, CSTV again gave college players some exposure for continuing their volleyball careers with the Collegiate Championships held in San Diego. The event featured eight of the top programs in the country including Stanford, Nebraska, Texas, Penn State, Minnesota, Florida and USD.
Clips will be available online at CSTV.com, and the entire program will be released in late April with McPeak providing color commentary as she did in 2006.
Perhaps if it weren't for the opportunity CSTV and the AVP gave to college players across the country, future stars might never have had the chance to even compete at the professional level.
"It's really it's a very hard sport to get into. I'm from Washington and being in the sand is something that you do since you're 10 years old, if you're from California," Prince said. "In Hawaii people played, but really not as much as you would think and when my coach got the call from the AVP, I thought it must be a sign that this is what I'm supposed to do. If they wouldn't have called, I'm not so sure that I'd be doing this, so that's a really good thing that they're doing for the college athletes because you really don't know how to get involved, you're really not sure how to put your foot in the door."

Pro volleyball player returns home May 10
Association of Volleyball Professional player and Independence High School graduate Jennifer Snyder will be in town for the AVP Westgate Open May 10 to 13 at the Westgate City Center, 91st and Glendale avenues.
By George Witkowski
With apologies to Thomas Wolfe about not being able to go home, Glendale native and volleyball professional Jennifer Snyder can count the days before arriving here.
Snyder, a 1994 graduate of Independence High School, will be playing in the Association of Volleyball Professionals Westgate Open May 10 to 13 at Westgate City Center, just steps from Jobing.com Arena. She was a First Team All big west in 1996 and 1997 at Long Beach State and was a member of Long Beach State's Final Four team in 1997. After graduating with a communications degree from Long Beach, she played professional in Switzerland for one season.
The 6-foot-2 Snyder has amassed nearly eight thousand in winnings and her highest finish has been third place (five times).
Snyder, 30, played club and high school volleyball for Leaven Eubank at Independence and he has been a big influence to this day, she said.
“He saw me playing as a big gangly person and asked me to play club volleyball and kind of held my hand along the way,” she said. “He got me volleyballs to start with and he's been kind of my right hand guy.”
Snyder has been on the pro circuit for two years and played in Tempe last year with her teammate Janelle Ruen. Snyder and Ruen were 47th qualifier seed early last year and halfway through the season they were seeded 16th.
Getting interested in volleyball was never a problem, she said.
“I always loved it,” Snyder said. “I used to play basketball, but I blew out my knee, and while I was in rehab, the basketball coach wasn't very accommodating.”
Life on the road is always a new experience, especially when she was a rookie, but Snyder is a little more familiar with each city and crowd.
“Traveling is tough, but it is also fun getting to see new places,” she said. “Last year was a struggle most of the time. Chicago is fun and Louisville is also fun and the people make it what it is.”
Snyder said when people ask for advice about getting into volleyball, she is able to answer their questions in a newsletter question and answer column.
“Most people are pretty accommodating and I write a Q& A column for Quad City Volleyball,” she said.
Although Snyder is living in Costa Mesa, Calif., she is looking forward to seeing the family, friends and places while in Glendale, but finding quiet time is the key element.
“I try and relax while traveling and I like to go for walks and read a book,” she said. “We (are on the) go all the time and to be still is nice. My family is in Glendale and I'm excited.”
Whether it is volleyball or any other sport, most athletes are prone to avoid saying they have seen it or know it all, and Snyder is no exception.
“You never know enough and there's always something you can learn about it,” she said.
In her second year with the AVP tour, Snyder is hoping for a successful visit to Glendale, both professionally and personally.
For more information about the AVP Westgate Open, visit www.avp.com.

Cuervo laying out a hot promotion
Ultimate Beach Girl, Guy to appear in Maxim
By Mike Scarr / AVP.com
So you believe you're the ultimate?
Well, you've got your shot to prove it as Jose Cuervo is providing just that opportunity in the Ultimate Beach Girl & Guy contest.
"It is about the beach and the lifestyle and fun and sort of the whole Cuervo experience. It all goes so well with beach volleyball," said Jose Cuervo marketing director Scott Geisler. "Ultimate Beach Girl & Guy is a way to celebrate that."
Combining a bit of the runway with the nature of sport, the season-long promotion on the 2007 AVP Crocs Tour will culminate at the AVP Las Vegas Gods & Goddesses of the Beach at Caesar's Palace, Sept. 6-8. There, one woman and one man will be crowned as the Ultimate Beach Girl and Ultimate Beach Guy and awarded a one-year modeling contract and the opportunity to appear in Maxim and Cosmopolitan magazines.
"It connects the lifestyle with the sport," Geisler said, emphasizing the aspect of drinking responsibly. "It's celebrating summer, it's celebrating fun and sort of just taking it easy."
The contest is as simple to enter as it is to log on, provided you've got what it takes.
You can enter online at avp.com with a deadline set for July 22. One can also enter on-site until Sept. 2 at designated kiosks at the Cuervo Cabana at select AVP events. A current photo is required for online entries while an original essay of no more than 250 characters is required for all submissions.
Online entries will be narrowed to 60 semifinalists to be determined by submission date. There will be 20 semifinalists (10 male and 10 female) for entries received between April 12 and May 7. Another 20 will be selected from submissions between May 8 and June 13 and the remaining 20 will be chosen from those online entries received between June 14 and July 22.
Semifinalists will be awarded points determined by the originality of their photo, written expression and the overall adherence to the theme. Their entries will then be posted on avp.com for peer voting, Aug. 1-10, from which two finalists will be selected to compete for the grand prize.
On the road to Vegas, Cuervo will also conduct a total of 12 individual contests at AVP tour stops to help determine the 24 finalists that will join the two online finalists for the right to head to Sin City. Each finalist is awarded a three-day, two-night stay in Las Vegas, and four winners have already stamped their tickets.
For the event contests, six walk-off winners each for men and women will be determined in a catwalk competition selected by crowd applause. The event winners are then determined via text messaging with spectators able to use their own phones or those provided on-site by Cuervo.
Paul Christopher, 30, and 25-year-old Veronica Trollerud won at the season-opening event in Miami, while Ricky Tran, also 30, and the 21-year-old, I-have-friends-but-not-Friends, Courtney Cox took home the honors in Dallas.
The contest continues next weekend in Southern California, when the AVP Cuervo Gold Crown Huntington Beach Open takes to the sand from May 3-6. This one has a twist.
California residents are eligible to participate in the contest but are not allowed to win any prizes and will simply gain the honor for their local event. The other three California events will be Hermosa Beach, May 18-20; Long Beach, July 19-22; and Manhattan Beach, Aug. 9-12.
The next tournament with full eligibility will be the AVP Sanderson Ford Glendale Open, May 10-13, near Phoenix.
While the pros on tour have the physical assets required for such a contest, volleyball is not a prerequisite. In fact, even playing the sport is not a necessity and neither is a purchase of any Cuervo product to enter the Ultimate Beach Girl & Guy contest. The company sees it as a natural extension of its AVP sponsorship.
"There is a need for us as a business to spread the awareness as much as possible," Geisler said of his company, which also sponsors the Cuervo Gold triple crown series. "So being the Ultimate Beach Girl and Guy and being on the beach, drinking margaritas and watching volleyball, it all fits."
Mike Scarr is a senior reporter for AVP.com.

FIJI Water Hits the Sand as the 'Official Water of the AVP Pro Beach Volleyball Crocs Tour'
FIJI Water Announces Sponsorship Deal With the AVP and Offers Consumers a
Chance to Play Against Volleyball Stars in Fiji
LOS ANGELES, April 30 /PRNewswire/ -- FIJI(R) Water, a major premium
bottled water brand in the United States, today announced it will be the
"Official Water of the AVP Pro Beach Volleyball Crocs Tour" for the 2007
season. Featuring more than 150 of the top American male and female
competitors in the sport, the beach volleyball tour will hit 18 cities in
13 U.S. states, which kicked off April 12 in Miami, Florida and runs
through September 16 in San Francisco, Calif. Both FIJI Water and the AVP
promote and encourage a healthy lifestyle and together they will bring
summer excitement and pure hydration from a natural artesian source to
millions of volleyball fans and beachgoers across the country.
    FIJI Water will be providing the athletes with what they need most --
hydration. Drawn from an artesian aquifer deep below the Earth's surface on
the Fijian island of Viti Levu, FIJI Water contains naturally-occurring
minerals including electrolytes that are critical for hydration and muscle
health. In celebration of the athletes' strength and talent, FIJI Water has
taken their involvement with the AVP one step further by partnering with
two players, Suzanne Stonebarger and Michelle More. Only three years into
the AVP, Stonebarger and More, are the youngest team ranked in the top ten
and are expected to break into the top five this season.
    FIJI Water is sponsoring a national sweepstakes this summer that allows
individuals a chance to win a trip to the Islands of Fiji and play in, or
watch, a special AVP exhibition match with professional players, including
Stonebarger and More. Additional prizes include tickets to local AVP tour
events and/or AVP-FIJI Water branded merchandise. Consumers can enter at
retail locations or online at http://www.fijiwater.com from July to September.
    "FIJI Water is very excited to partner with the AVP," said John
Cochran, President, FIJI Water. "It's the perfect drink to be consumed by
healthy athletes, like the competing volleyball players, who want to be at
the top of their game. This year's AVP tour will bring huge crowds of
players and fans to the beach, providing an ideal environment for FIJI
Water to keep everyone hydrated during the intense matches while delivering
important health benefits from our unique and natural source."
    "We are thrilled to have FIJI Water on board as the official water of
the AVP," said Leonard Armato, CEO and commissioner of the AVP. "FIJI Water
will be a great addition to the tour and we are looking forward to reaching
out to volleyball fans from coast-to-coast through the company's
contributions and exciting marketing and retail campaigns."
    FIJI Water is a natural source of electrolytes, such as calcium,
magnesium and bicarbonate -- all of which are vital for good health.
Electrolytes help regulate important physiological functions and are
important for hydration, as well as muscle and nerve health. Electrolytes
can be lost when the body sweats or becomes dehydrated, especially during
exercise and warm seasons, and FIJI Water can help naturally replenish
these missing electrolytes.
    About FIJI Water
    FIJI(R) Water, a natural artesian water bottled at the source in Viti
Levu (Fiji islands), is the second largest imported bottled water brand in
the United States. A product of one of the last virgin ecosystems on the
planet, natural pressure forces FIJI Water out of its aquifer deep below
the earth's surface and into iconic square bottles through a sealed
delivery system free of human contact.
    FIJI Water is available in four convenient sizes to suit any lifestyle.
The 330 ml (11.16 oz) or Lil'FIJI, 500 ml (16.91 oz), 1 L (33.81 oz) and
1.5 L (50.72 oz) bottles are available in single serve and/or multi-packs
at leading retail locations, and are also served at premiere hotels,
restaurants and gourmet shops. FIJI Water is also available for home
delivery in the continental United States at http://www.fijiwater.com. FIJI
Water received the United States Secretary of State's 2004 Award for
Corporate Excellence. It is the fastest-growing super-premium bottled water
and has been top-rated in taste tests among bottled waters by Cook's
Illustrated Buying Guide, Men's Health and others.
    About the AVP, Inc.
    AVP Pro Beach Volleyball Tour, Inc. is a leading lifestyle sports
entertainment company focused on the production, marketing and distribution
of professional beach volleyball events worldwide. AVP operates the
industry's most prominent national touring series, the AVP Pro Beach
Volleyball Tour, which was organized in 1983. Featuring more than 150 of
the top American men and women competitors in the sport, AVP is set to
stage 18 events throughout the United States in 2007. In 2004, AVP athletes
successfully represented the United States during the Olympics in Athens,
Greece, winning gold and bronze medals, the first medals won by U.S. women
in professional beach volleyball. For more information, please visit
http://www.avp.com.

Photos:

AVP Tour Talk–Dallas pics

From: amjones

Friday
http://www.picasaweb.google.com/alanmjones/2007DallasAVPFriday

Saturday
http://www.picasaweb.google.com/alanmjones/2007DallasAVPSaturday


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 May 3rd-6th 2007 AVP Quervo Gold Crown SERIES HUNTINGTON OPEN
 HuntingtonBeach,C
A $200,000

 

 
ianclarkakaiman2.jpg Huntingtonsrfcty.jpg  

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Event Facts
Event Start Date:Thursday, May.3rd, 2007
Prize Money:$200,000.00

Webcams:

  WaveWatch


  Huntington Beach Webcam
HBwebcam1.jpg Sdavenport27.jpg

Event Links:                                                                        Scott Davenport
                                                                                             Photo By Lynn Chu 

- Ian Clark played the 2002 & 2004 Huntington Beach Open with Scott Davenport and the 2003 event with Chip McCaw.
- This year Ian Clark will not be playing the 2007 Huntington Beach Open due to prior commitments.

  AVP Tour Event Coverage AVPtourlogo6.gif

(Format: Double Elimination)


* Ian Clark's Year 2004 Results

13th - Ian Clark/Scott Davenport             $1050.00

Match Results:

Winner's Bracket
Round 1

Match 7: Jim Nichols / Matt Olson (13) def. Ian Clark / Scott Davenport (20) 22-20, 25-23 (0:45)

Contender's Bracket
Round 1

Match 34: Ian Clark / Scott Davenport (20) def. Nick Hannemann / Mark Paaluhi (29, Q14) 21-12, 21-15 (0:39)
Round 2
Match 42: Ian Clark / Scott Davenport (20) def. Chip McCaw / Alika Williams (19) 19-21, 21-15, 15-8 (0:54)
Round 3
Match 48: Casey Jennings / Matt Fuerbringer (6) def. Ian Clark / Scott Davenport (20) 14-21, 21-10, 15-9 (0:58)

-With a match record of (2) wins & (2) losses Ian Clark/Scott Davenport finish 13th at the 2004 Nissan Huntington Beach Open



AVP Quervo Gold Crown Huntington Beach Open

Huntington Beach Pier
May 3rd-6th 2007
One of the AVP Pro Beach Volleyball Tour's favorite hot spots is Huntington Beach, Calif. scheduled for a May 3rd-6th stop on the 2007 AVP Quervo Gold Crown Series. With Jim Menges and Greg Lee notching the first men's title in 1975, the site has seen an AVP event every year since 1999 and in 2003 hosted Misty May, who grew up in nearby Costa Mesa, Calif., and partner Kerri Walsh's sixth victory on the tour.

Where to play in the area:
AVPNext sanctioned California Beach Volleyball Ass